first_imgPhoto Caption: New York City from PixabayDell EMC will “Let the Transformation Begin” next week during Strata+Hadoop World 2016 at the Javits Conference Center. The recent formation of Dell EMC has created an even more powerful company, driven to ensure your analytics capabilities are stronger than ever. As a Strategic Sponsor, we look forward to showcasing our newly combined, extensive portfolio.Swing by the Dell EMC booth (#501) to demo our latest products, speak with our onsite experts, and experience our booth theater presentations. Dell EMC will also be featured in the Cloudera Partner Pavilion, and will be holding a number of speaking sessions throughout the conference. Please include the following sessions on your calendar:Data science from idea to pilot to production: Challenges and lessons learnedAmihai Savir | Tuesday, Sept. 27 | 10:00-10:30 am | Location: 1B 01/02In the age of big data analytics, smart monitoring and predicting abnormal behavior of corporation mission-critical systems can save large amounts of time and money. Drawing on a real-world case study from EMC, Amihai Savir, a seasoned data scientist currently leading a team of data scientists in Dell EMC, offers an overview of the team’s remarkable journey, discussing the multiple phases and development stages as well as the many questions and doubts that arose along the way. Eventually, the project proved a great success and is now running in production monitoring the MS Exchange and Authentication (ITOA) environments. Amihai will share the team’s experience and insights, which will provide value and a solid knowledge foundation for managers, data scientists, analytics professionals, and IT operations to leverage in order to drive and build data-driven processes.Modern Analytics with Dell EMCPatricia Florissi | Wednesday, Sept. 28 | 10:05-10:10 am | Location: Javits NorthIt is clear that we’re at a critical inflection point in the industry – organizations are realizing that they must quickly adapt in order to keep pace in today’s ever-changing digital economy. With your most precious commodity, data, increasing at an alarming rate, it is essential that it be a component to your deepest insights and allowing you to focus on your business outcomes.Achieve Richer Insights and Business Outcomes with Dell EMC Big Data and AnalyticsCarey James | Wednesday, Sept. 28 | 11:20 am – 12:00 pm | Location: 1B 01/02Big Data and analytics is a team sport empowering companies of all kinds to achieve business outcomes faster and with greater levels of success. Dell EMC has integrated all the key components for modern digital transformation, taking you on a Big Data journey that focuses on analytics, integration and infrastructure. Our portfolio provides the flexibility to buy or build your analytics ecosystem, the choice is yours. Our offerings range from servers and data lakes to flexible analytics with a turn-key development platform. In this session we discuss how the formation of Dell Technologies and Dell EMC can help you on your data analytics journey and how you can turn actionable insights into new business opportunities.Getting it right exactly once: Principles for streaming architecturesDarryl Smith | Wednesday, Sept. 28 | 1:15-1:55 pm | Location: 1 C04 / 1 C05We are moving to real time, and data scientists need a framework to evaluate and architect the right technologies. Darryl Smith, chief data platform architect and distinguished engineer at Dell Technologies, shares tested principles for streaming architectures so you can navigate solution options quickly. The mission—reinforced by the rise of Apache Kafka and the importance of exactly once semantics—is clear: move from batch to real time.Enhancing the customer experience when driving Hadoop adoptionAnthony Dina | Wednesday, Sept. 28 | 2:55-3:35 pm | Location: 1B 01/02Defining the challenges, outlining the goals, identifying the use cases, and tracking ROI are always important considerations when building a big data strategy, but what about greater behind-the-scenes challenges like security, consumer privacy, fraud detection, governance, and financial investment? Each impacts the business and its brand. Mastercard’s Nick Curcuru hosts an interactive fireside chat with Anthony Dina from Dell EMC to explore how the flexibility, scalability, and agility of Hadoop big data solutions allow one of the world’s leading organizations to innovate, enable, and enhance the customer experience while still expanding emerging opportunities. You’ll also have the chance to discuss the most important considerations for driving big data strategies and implementations.But wait, that’s not all! Dell EMC is an official sponsor of Data After Dark on Wednesday evening from 8:00-11:00 p.m. aboard the City at Sea: Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum. While exploring life at sea, enjoy an XD theater simulator, a lounge, a DJ, and much more, as you wander through different areas with themed cocktails, appetizers, and entertainment.If you are unable to attend the event, be sure to follow along on Twitter. We’ll be providing live updates from our @DellEMCBigData and @DellAlliances handles, and via the #DellEMC and #StrataHadoop hashtags.We hope to see you there!last_img read more

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first_imgSeptember is Hispanic Heritage Month, an opportunity to honor the generations of Hispanic and Latinx Americans who have enriched our society and culture. It is also an opportunity for me personally to take a moment to celebrate the wonderful achievements of our Hispanic and Latinx team members while recognizing the opportunity we have in front of us to bring more diverse perspectives to the table.I’ve been at Dell Technologies for more than 25 years starting my career here in HR after graduating from The University of Texas. Aside from growing professionally here, I’ve also had the opportunity to actively give back to the Latinx and Hispanic communities, something I feel truly passionate about and has made my time at Dell so meaningful.The power of partnershipsOne of the partnerships I’m most proud of that we have made here at Dell is the one we have with the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility (HACR) where I sit on the board. Founded in 1986, HACR’s mission is to advance the inclusion of Hispanics in corporate America. We’ve been a proud sponsor of the work HACR does to increase the Hispanic population in today’s working world, which priorities civic and community duties among other attributes when assessing potential talent. Our partnership with HACR creates opportunities for our Dell Technologies team members to participate in a skills-based development program while opening the door to networking opportunities with Hispanic executives across various industries. Our goal? Help our team members grow professionally.It’s programs like these – that prioritize professional development, mentoring, and networking – that will be critical as we help our diverse team members progress in their careers in a meaningful way. It’s a key reason why we introduced a targeted internal advocacy program aimed at paring our high performing talent from Black and Hispanic backgrounds with executive leaders who can help coach, train, and prepare them for continued acceleration. Additionally, in collaboration with The Partnership Leadership Development Program, we’re helping diverse talent at various points in their career build the leadership skills necessary to succeed at work. The learning and engagement gained during these programs and initiatives equip our diverse talent with the skills they need to be successful in their career and have the same opportunity for advancement as their peers.The importance of connection The work Latino Connection, one of our 13 Employee Resource Groups, is doing on this front is also driving change. With their purpose to champion access and opportunities for our Hispanic and Latinx team members they are fostering an inclusive community that promotes cultural awareness across the organization. And throughout the pandemic, they have really shown up for their members, prioritizing driving personal connections – even in today’s virtual environment – to help our team members connect and develop in a meaningful way. To celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month they are offering virtual cooking classes, Salsa lessons, a discussion on giving back to the Hispanic and Latinx communities, and a special panel where two of our senior leaders shared their journeys and insights as Hispanic and Latinx American women in the technology industry, to name a few. The impact we can have We’re also engaging with organizations outside our four walls to address issues facing Hispanic and Latinx communities. Just last week, in partnership with the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute, we hosted a special Policy Hack to uncover ways to address the digital divide and discuss how technology can be leveraged to narrow economic injustices, racial bias, health inequalities, and workforce readiness impacting the Hispanic and Latinx communities in the U.S. The winning team came up with a solution that included several recommendations to bring together public and private partnerships to provide the right technology to help provide more opportunities for underrepresented communities and groups. One of the ideas was to create a voucher program giving access to devices and internet access for children which could be automatically integrated into the economic support system for low-income families.Cultivating a culture of inclusion – one where everyone feels they belong and can succeed – is a critical part of who we are at Dell Technologies. We believe true innovation is possible when diverse perspectives, ideas, and backgrounds come together. And while we’re proud of the progress we’re making on this front, we know more focus is needed to achieve true equity and to be the employer of choice for all. It’s why we have committed to having 25% of our U.S. workforce and 15% of our U.S. people leaders identify as Black/African American and Hispanic/Latinx minorities by 2030.But as we continue to work towards these goals, we know real change can’t happen in a silo – it will require continued collaboration – with partnerships, other organizations, and our team members – to ensure we’re equipping everyone with the skills they need to succeed in our industry.last_img read more

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first_imgPARIS (AP) — Six nongovernmental organizations have opened the first class-action lawsuit against France for alleged systemic discrimination by police carrying out identity checks. The organizations, including Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International, contend that French police use racial profiling in checks, targeting people who are Black or of Arab descent. The NGOs aren’t demanding monetary damages, and instead seek deep reforms to ensure that racial profiling does not determine who gets stopped by police.  They say ‘systemic’ changes are needed in response to a ‘systemic’ problem. Letters officially notifying France’s prime minister and interior and justice ministers were being delivered Wednesday.last_img read more

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first_imgBEIJING (AP) — An official indicator of China’s manufacturing activity has weakened for a second consecutive month in January, following outbreaks of domestic COVID-19 cases that affected the operations of some industries. The purchasing managers’ index for China’s manufacturing sector fell to 51.3 in January, down 0.6 percentage points from December, according to data from the National Bureau of Statistics. Readings above 50 indicate expansion of the manufacturing industry, while a reading below it reflects a contraction. The indicators for China’s service industry also dipped in January amid the local coronavirus outbreaks. The PMI for China’s non-manufacturing sector came in at 52.4 in January, down from 55.7 in December.last_img read more

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first_imgThe Saint Mary’s College Student Government Association (SGA) passed legislation outlining the future structure of Senate and announced the dates of the upcoming College-wide elections in their meeting Tuesday. The student body election period will take place from Feb. 27 to March 1. Candidates for SGA, Residence Hall Association, Student Activities Board, Student Diversity Board, student body president and vice president may begin campaigning Feb. 26. The results of the elections on March 1 will be announced the following day. Senate and Class Board candidates may begin campaigning March 4 for the March 8 elections, with results announced March 9. Current juniors, sophomores and first years can campaign for Senate positions during this period. Incoming first years will round out the Senate with elections in September. SGA members will staff an informational table from Feb. 13-17 to introduce students to the future structure of SGA. Though the table’s location has yet to be determined, SGA members will inform them about the election process, executive secretary Emma Brink said. “We are committed to getting as many students as possible to participate in the elections, whether by running or voting,” Brink said. Brink said SGA hopes the presence of the informational table will increase voter participation in the upcoming election. Part of SGA’s new structure will involve incorporating creative ways to get more students to vote and promoting enthusiasm about running for Senate. In its meeting, SGA also approved legislation outlining the new structure of the Senate, which will now be comprised of fifteen students who represent diverse interests and student involvement at Saint Mary’s. The students will be divided by class year to guarantee fair representation of the student body, with positions allocated for four seniors, four juniors, four sophomores and three first years. “SGA is extremely excited to introduce the new structure to students and promote the new opportunities that students will have on the Senate,” Brink said.last_img read more

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first_imgSaint Mary’s students gained a glimpse into competing views of feminism last night during the lecture titled “Warrior Women vs. Ragpickers: Divergent Paths in Contemporary Feminism” last night in the Stapleton Lounge. Mary Caputi, political science professor at California State University Long Beach, explored two camps of contemporary feminism in her lecture and said critical thinking should play a more significant role in analyzing modern feminism. Caputi also taught at Saint Mary’s College in the early 1990s. “A lot in our culture equates feminism with consumerism, liberation and facile abuses of power. We need to use critical thinking skills to analyze what is really presented in feminism,” Caputi said. Caputi said the two schools of thought in contemporary feminism can best be described by the nicknames of the “New Girl Order” and “ragpicker feminism.” “New Girl Order can also be referred to as wake-up-and-smell-the-lip-gloss feminism or stiletto feminism,” Caputi said. “This type is very much centered on the motto ‘feminism is whatever I as an individual say it is.’” Caputi said this school of thought often lacks the skills of critical thinking. “This feminism celebrates the neoliberal of current capital and global capital,” Caputi said. “It often lacks the ability to step back and ask why money, power and sex are being offered.” Caputi said the New Girl Order is based on rugged American individualism. It aggressively uses power and risks buying into models of masculinity, she said. Caputi said she believes ragpicker feminism, the second school of thought, is the better path in the diverging road of contemporary feminism. This feminism focuses on more than the individual through an analytical lens, she said. “Feminists should be like ragpickers,” Caputi said. “They need to have their eyes open to focus on what got left out. They need to search for what is part of the mix, but didn’t get a voice.” Ragpicker feminism aims to help those who are oppressed and specifically looks at economic and sociopolitical political problems within the global community, she said. “This school of thought wants to use critical thinking to help anyone who identifies as a feminist, whether it be a man or women, ask the question of how power is being used,” Caputi said. Stacy Davis, associate professor of religious studies and coordinator for the Women’s Studies Program, said it is important to recognize feminism in its multiple contemporary forms. “On this campus specifically, I think a lot of people believe feminism is something that other people did,” Davis said. “It is often marginalized or diminished without truly knowing the different ways you can be a feminist and use feminist theory.” Caputi said society needs to practice ragpicker feminism more than New Girl Order feminism. “It is necessary that we adopt the mindset of the ragpicker because feminism is not an issue only about women, but also issues that concern the world,” she said.last_img read more

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first_imgThe Notre Dame Chinese Students & Scholars Association (NDCSSA) will host a celebration in honor of the Chinese New Year tonight from 7-9 p.m., in Washington Hall.According to its website, the NDCSSA was created in 1991 as a “non-profit and non-political organization of all Chinese students and scholars.” NDCSSA is the largest foreign students and scholars club at Notre Dame with over 400 members.NDCSSA president Bo Hong said the first Chinese New Year Gala on campus took place in 1992 and moved to its current venue, Washington Hall in 2009.“The content of the gala is different every year,” Hong said. “Generally, there will be Chinese traditional choreography, traditional instrument performance, history drama, pop song singing, Fashion shows — including modern style and Chinese traditional costumes of different dynasties in Chinese history — playing games with the audience, and so forth.”This year’s celebration marks the beginning of the Year of the Goat. Hong said the Chinese Spring Festival, or Lunar New Year, is based on the lunar calendar and can be traced back thousands of years.“Legend has it that the Emperor invented the calendar in 2637 B.C.,” Hong said. “It was recorded that Chinese started to celebrate Chinese New Year from about 2000 B.C. They started to celebrate on the first day of the lunar calendar based on Emperor Wu Di’s almanac of the Han Dynasty.”Hong said this celebration recognized and responded to a mythical beast called Nian.“The beast Nian could infiltrate houses silently to prey on humans,” Hong said. “To keep Nian away, red-paper couplets are pasted on doors, torches are lit, and firecrackers are set off throughout the night, because Nian is said to fear the color red, the light of fire, and loud noises.”Hong said the Koreans and Vietnamese also celebrate their New Years on the same day.“In Vietnam, the first three days [of the New Year] are public holidays,” Hong said. “A few countries around the world regularly issue postage stamps or numismatic coins to commemorate Chinese New Year.”These countries — including Australia, Canada, Christmas Island, El Salvador, France, the Phillipines and the U.S. — recognize the significant number of their citizens who are of Chinese origin in their tribute to the Chinese New Year. Hong said this recognition is similar to the NDCSSA’s objective in hosting the gala.The Chinese New Year Gala is open to all students, whether or not they are part of the NDCSSA, and attendees are welcome to leave early or stay as long as they want. Admission is free.Tags: Chinese, Chinese New Year, lunar new year, NDCSSA, Notre Dame Chinese Students & Scholars Associationlast_img read more

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first_imgEditor’s Note: A version of this story was published on March 27.The University announced Fr. Gregory J. Boyle, the founder and executive director of Homeboy Industries, as the 2017 recipient of Notre Dame’s Laetare Medal in a press release March 26.The Laetare medal is awarded annually by the University to an American Catholic figure “whose genius has ennobled the arts and sciences, illustrated the ideals of the Church and enriched the heritage of humanity.”According to the press release, Homeboy Industries — which Boyle founded in Los Angeles in 1988 — is “now the largest gang intervention, rehabilitation and re-entry program in the world.” Each year, the organization helps 10,000 men and women who are struggling with violence and being cycled through the prison system to “develop the strength and skills to transform their lives and become contributing members of society.”“At Homeboy, we try to hold up a mirror and say, ‘Here’s who you are; you’re exactly what God had in mind when he made you,’” Boyle said in the release. “Then you have this moment with people when they become that truth.”University President Fr. John Jenkins said in the release that Boyle’s decades of work made him an “inspiring” figure in the Catholic Church.“For nearly 30 years, Father Boyle has served men and women who have been incarcerated and involved with gangs, and, in doing so, has helped them to discover the strength and hope necessary to transform their lives,” he said in the release. “Father Boyle’s solidarity with our sisters and brothers at the margins of society offers an inspiring model of faith in action. We are grateful for the witness of his life and honored to bestow this award on him.”Boyle said in the press release that he is honored to receive the 2017 Laetare Medal.“You want a university to be in the world what you invite the world to become,” he said. “Notre Dame is like that. It’s an honor to be recognized as the Laetare Medal recipient and I’m very grateful.”Tags: Commencement 2017, Fr. Greg Boyle, Homeboy Industries, Laetare Medallast_img read more

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first_imgThe new Notre Dame women’s club basketball team has competed in four tournaments in their inaugural semester. The team is comprised of a fluctuating 15 to 20 members and coached by Rob Coloney, the director of Graduate Career Services. Two of the four tournaments were in Chicago, and one was for regionals at Dayton University, where the club received a free automatic bid to nationals in two weeks in Wichita, Kansas. Most recently, the club hosted a tournament on Notre Dame’s campus, sophomore Kate Mulshine, who serves as vice president of the club, said. The formation of the club team has been in the works since the fall of 2017, junior Caroline VanKirk said. VanKirk said she was connected with current senior Megan Kamm by Club Sports last spring. They now serve as co-presidents of the club. “I had talked to a couple people at club sports about [the prospect of a women’s club basketball team] in the spring of last year, and then they gave me Megan’s contact because Megan had been involved in trying to start it the previous fall with two girls who ended up walking onto the actual team,” VanKirk said. Freshman twins Cate and Maggie Murdock also said they both had interest in the formation of the club team during their senior year of high school.“When we were still deciding where to [attend college] basketball was important,” Cate Murdock said.Maggie Murdock added that they knew about the lack of a women’s club basketball team, so they emailed club sports and were connected with VanKirk.After the Murdock twins, along with other interested girls, were connected with VanKirk and Kamm, the team started scrimmaging a couple times a week in the fall. However, at the time, the team wasn’t allowed to reserve courts because of its pending status as an official club sport, VanKirk said.Recruitment was largely based on the formation of a group text which included girls who play interhall basketball, VanKirk said. As the team is in its first year, they chose to not enter a league, which is expensive and restricts teams to certain tournaments, and instead play at individual tournaments, Mulshine said. VanKirk said their team is having trouble with adequate funding due to their success, as there is a maximum allocation of funds that first-year clubs receive. The club is still on probationary status, she added.“It was weird because we won this free bid to nationals, but we have to pay for hotel rooms and plane tickets,” Mulshine said. Mulshine and VanKirk said the club made a Notre Dame Day video, and even reached out to Notre Dame Day organizers to be on the livestream. There is also a fundraiser for the club on Saturday at Chipotle. All four members interviewed said their hopes for next season include sustaining their winning streak, getting more funding and making it to nationals for a second time. Cate Murdock said she enjoyed the camaraderie of the team. “It’s been so fun to hangout with all the people on the team. We are all such close friends now,” she said. “We actually hangout outside of basketball,” VanKirk added. Mulshine added the community of the club is something she has really enjoyed. “I’ve been here for a year, but I’ve never really found something that is my ‘thing,’” Mulshine said. “It’s really cool to find a group of girls that you have so much in common with from different grades and dorms. I think we all missed that team aspect that we had in high school.”Tags: basketball, club basketball, Notre Dame Day, Women’s club basketballlast_img read more

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