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first_imgSaint Mary’s Moreau Center for the Arts will host its annual theatre picnic on Tuesday, Sept. 10 from 5 – 6:30 p.m. on O’Laughlin Green. The department plans to emphasize collaboration, giving back and teaching the community about the importance of theatre at the event at the showcase for its new events, activities and opportunities this school year.Professor Michaela Duffy, technical director of the theatre department, explained the department’s goal for the picnic.“The main goal is to have anybody on campus interested in theater, come to the picnic, share food, introduce themselves, get to know the faculty a little bit and each other,” Duffy said. “This could be anybody who is interested in any aspect of performing arts, not just majors or minors, anyone who is interested in auditioning, working in the scene and costume shops, or even being part of the back-stage crew. It’ll be an old fashioned cookout with lots of desserts, all the fixings for brats, hamburgers and hot dogs, as well as lawn games, and of course, some theatre games.”There will also be a $5 early-bird special for the new Moreau Center t-shirts, Duffy said.The Moreau Center will also hold their second annual series of “Makers’ Meetings” where the scene shop, costume shop, music program and dance program coming together once a month to create opportunities to inspire creativity. Students are also invited to participate in master classes. The first two master classes include an Artistic Fencing Workshop on Sept. 20 and a trip to downtown South Bend for Octoberfest on Oct. 4.Sandie Schooler, who works in the theatre department at Saint Mary’s, shared some of the Moreau Center’s plans for giving back to the environment.“We’re trying to find a need and fill it,” Schooler said. “We’ll be making reusable washable feminine hygiene products for women that don’t have them readily available.”They will also be making clothing protectors for the sisters in the convent later in the year, Schooler said.Schooler said fun is a major goal of the theatre department this year.“We really, really, really try to have fun here,” Schooler said. “The goal this year is to promote the building and encourage more people to join and have fun with us.”The 2019-2020 performing arts season will open with the fall show, “A Party to Murder,” which will run Nov. 7-9 at 7:30 p.m. and concluding with a matinee on Nov. 10 at 2:30 p.m. Later performances include the Madrigal dinner in December, “A Family Affair: An Evening of Opera Scenes” in February, which will return after a few years on the shelf and “Alice in Wonderland” in March. The season will conclude with DanceArts 2020 in April.In addition to the on-stage and community engagement opportunities, there are also many behind-the-scenes jobs available to students as well.Sophomore Caroline Mages, who works in the scene shop, said she learned about different tools, how to build different things and developed skills she didn’t think she would need to learn but will use in the future.“It’s a nice escape between classes, but still a learning experience about all the different aspects of theatre,” Mages said.Tags: picnic, saint mary’s, Theatrelast_img read more

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first_imgSaint Mary’s Dean of Student Academic Services Karen Chambers announced new changes to the grading policies for the spring semester in an email to undergraduates Thursday.Earlier this month, the College adopted a more generous pass/fail grading policy for the Spring 2020 semester, Chambers said, which includes the option to declare Sophia and general elective courses for pass/fail credit until the last day of the semester.The updated policies include the option to withdraw from any course until the last day of the semester — April 30 — without penalty. All withdrawals that occur after mid-semester break will be treated as withdraw/pass. Chambers said this serves as a way to take no credit and no grade in any course. Additionally, students may withdraw from a class without permission from a faculty member up to April 30.There will be a notation on all student transcripts that acknowledges that a global pandemic during the spring 2020 semester led to unusual enrollment patterns and grades, the email said.Chambers clarified that the option for pass/fail grading will not be extended to major and minor courses.“Our goal was to think through the academic consequences of the current disruption to our teaching and learning environment,” Chambers said in the email. “Throughout the conversations, there was consideration and concern for questions around equity, access, engagement, and academic integrity.”According to the email, faculty were concerned students would be unprepared for courses in the future after the implementation of pass/fail. “One of the primary concerns of faculty about adopting pass/fail for courses in the major is that this would result in a lack of assurance of preparedness for subsequent courses. It might also result in an inability to potentially count P/F classes on applications for certain graduate programs, professional programs and licensure,” she said.Chambers said Thursday’s message comes in response to several messages — including a petition signed by many Saint Mary’s students — regarding grading as a result of the transition to remote courses.The email said the College also understands that students have very different learning environments across many different time zones and varied access to technologies.“In response, many faculty are delivering their curriculum asynchronously; this means that you are able to access the course materials at times that are favorable for your learning and individual situation,” Chambers said in the email.Tags: course withdrawl, Karen Chambers, pass-fail, smc academic affairslast_img read more

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first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),Typical lockstep response. 44 confirmed cases?! It’s ridiculous for them to include us with Erie County. Other adjoining counties are already in phase 1. Grow a set. MGN ImageMAYVILLE – Chautauqua County Executive PJ Wendel extended the County’s State of Emergency for up to thirty additional days on Thursday due to the continuing COVID-19 pandemic.Wendel says the extension helps the county qualify for state and federal assistance related to the County’s response to the pandemic.“The Western New York region has not met the Governor’s metrics test for a Phase 1 re-opening,” said Wendel.  “Chautauqua County is still fully subject to the “New York State on PAUSE” executive orders issued by the Governor, and I ask all County citizens and visitors to still “DO THE FIVE” to help stop COVID-19:  (1) HANDS – wash them often; (2) ELBOW – cough into it; (3) FACE – don’t touch it; (4) FEET – stay more than six (6) feet apart; and (5) FEEL SICK? – stay home.”“The County’s COVID-19 Response Team containing the appropriate public health and emergency services officials and staff continues to meet and issue updates to the public daily,” said Chautauqua County Commissioner of Health and Human Services Christine Schuyler.  “We must remain vigilant in all of our efforts to combat the COVID-19 pandemic.  If we fail to do so, all of our hard won progress will be lost.” The county reported no new cases of the virus on Thursday. There remain a total of 44 confirmed cases, with seven active, 33 recovered and four deaths.Earlier in the afternoon, Absolut Care of Westfield reported an employee who worked in the senior living facility tested positive for COVID-19. Although, the company did not release when the positive test was identified.The company said since learning of the positive result everyone at the home was tested, and so far, every test has come back negative.last_img read more

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first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) PxHere File Image.WASHINGTON – Negotiations are underway to find a compromise to save a COVID-19 relief bill on Capitol Hill.The debate on Coronavirus relief comes as Congress must also pass a $1.4 Trillion spending bill to avoid a shutdown. That measure must be approved by Friday at midnight to fund the federal government until the end of September 2021.Federal lawmakers are hopeful they can also find common ground on a $908 billion compromise relief plan.But, to get to an agreement with Republicans, Democrats may be forced to scrap $160-billion in federal aid to cash-strapped cities and states. And, Republicans may have to give up on liability protections for businesses faced with potential lawsuits during the pandemic.The relief package is expected to include extended unemployment programs for 16 weeks.The proposal would increase federal supplemental unemployment insurance benefits by $300 a week during that time.last_img read more

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first_img View Comments This set is a character in itself, constantly rotating throughout the show. How did you even begin to learn to work with it? It was one of the most thrilling days of my career when we got presented the model box and told about the concept of the set. We’d already been three days into rehearsal and Lindsey had made it clear that we weren’t doing a big production, the point of doing this was to make the play heard. And then she showed us the box. I’ve never known anything like it. It was watching a whole company of people with their jaws on the floor. It’s beautiful and magical and surprising and has great showmanship, but it also genuinely supports what we’re trying to do with the play. The box is like the machine of the play, it’s the life machine and I step on that box at the beginning of the show and I don’t get off it until the end. I’m bracing myself every time it spins. [Laughs.] Helen isn’t just a depressed woman, she’s multifaceted—how did you create the layers of this character? As bizarre as it sounds, a lot of the play happens to her. It would have been wrong for me to say, “OK, she’s got depression, so I’m just gonna play somebody with extreme anxiety and depression, and that’s it.” I think Treadwell has written someone who’s delicate and someone who lacks the imagination of a hero at the center of a drama. She’s not necessarily someone who is always going to commit a murder. She’s an ordinary woman who gets affected by this situation that she’s in. So I keep myself as loose and empty as possible and then just let the rest of the company slowly pummel me with a meat tenderizer, as it were. [Laughs.] American audiences know Rebecca Hall from her rich performances on the big screen, from her Golden Globe-nominated performance in Vicky Cristina Barcelona to her action-packed turn in Iron Man 3. But the daughter of legendary director and Royal Shakespeare Company founder Sir Peter Hall has no shortage of stage cred across the pond, including starring roles in her father’s production of Mrs. Warren’s Profession and Sam Mendes’ mountings of The Winter’s Tale and The Cherry Orchard. Now, Hall makes her Broadway debut in Machinal, playing a deeply depressed housewife who finds herself dissatisfied with marriage and motherhood. Below, Hall tells Broadway.com why taking on the challenging new role is like getting pummeled “with a meat tenderizer,” recounts her chaotic opening night and more. Machinal Related Shows The set had some fits and starts on opening night and you had to begin the show all over again—what was that night like for you? When it happened, it was horrible for obvious reasons. While they were trying to fix it, Lindsey was very inspiring. She was like, “Well, we could stop, we could all go home, but I feel like this woman has been waiting since 1928 to have her play done again on Broadway.” We all agreed, it seemed that we had to go back. It’s got such a cumulative force, and certainly for me if I start in the middle of it it’s very odd. I’ve only been half pummeled with the meat tenderizer as it were. [Laughs.] I was nervous going on the second time ‘cause I thought, do I have the energy to get through this? But the thing that struck me when I was onstage was wow, I’m actually doing something for the same audience who had just seen me do it an hour ago. I don’t think, ever in my career, that’s happened before. See Hall in Machinal at the American Airlines Theatre.center_img Show Closed This production ended its run on March 2, 2014 Why did you pick Machinal to make your Broadway debut? It was a combination of things. I wasn’t looking to do a show on Broadway—that wasn’t the starting point. But this play arrived and I would’ve done it anywhere, and that it happened to be being produced on Broadway was a bonus. It’s such an extraordinary piece of writing and so unusual and still so radical and so polarizing now, which I find fascinating. And [director] Lindsey Turner is a really inspiring and shining presence in theater right now, and I’ve been an admirer of her productions in the past, so I was thrilled that she wanted to work with me. Rebecca Hall Star Files I’m excited to see your new movie Tumbledown—did you choose a light romantic comedy to be your next project on purpose? You hit it on the head, that’s exactly what I wanted to do. I read this script when I was in rehearsals. I was so Machinal, Machinal, Machinal, heavy into it. I said to my agent, “I don’t think I can read anything right now.” And then I found myself needing something to read to get my mind out of this dark and depressing place, and I couldn’t put it down. I thought, “Oh, here we go, this is the tonic at the end of Machinal to stop me from going into a deep crash.” [Laughs.] This’ll be it, this’ll be lovely, and it’s a nice head space to go to and it’s really witty and funny and smart. I haven’t done anything like that for while. Wow, that’s heavy! How do you release this tension you build up throughout the performance? A lot of times [in theater], you come off really excited and full of adrenaline, and that’s often the indicator that it’s gone well. But this one is completely the other way around. If I come offstage like that, I know I haven’t been doing my job properly. If I come offstage subdued and I want to go and sit quietly by myself and stare at a wall, then I know that it’s gone well. [Laughs.] So I usually sit quietly for a little bit and then go get a drink.last_img read more

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first_imgHere’s a quick roundup of stories from backstage at the Tony Awards tonight. Jessie Mueller Would ‘Hop Over the Pond’ for Beautiful in West End Tony winner Jessie Mueller told Broadway.com that the producers of Beautiful: The Carole King Musical have been looking at taking the musical to the West End and that she would “gladly hop over the Pond for a while” to reprise her role in the hit tuner. “Some Kind of Wonderful” news for London! View Comments A Gentleman’s Guide Will ‘Definitely Happen’ in the West End The Tony-winning team behind A Gentleman’s Guide said that they “intend to bring the show to London” and that “it will definitely happen.” Hedwig Creators Writing ‘Much Weirder’ Sequel A Hedwig and the Angry Inch sequel is in the works. The creators revealed that it will be “much weirder” than Hedwig and based around the concept: “I don’t have any time left.” It will also contain the joke: “Hedwig’s d**k is huge in Japan.” So there we are. Kenny Leon Wants to Direct Samuel L. Jackson & LaTanya Richardson in Woolf Kenny Leon, who won the Tony for A Raisin in the Sun and is helming the soon to open Holler If Ya Hear Me, wants to direct Samuel L. Jackson and his wife LaTanya Richardson in, wait for it, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf. Jackson was last seen on Broadway in 2012’s The Mountaintop. Richardson, of course, is currently appearing in Raisin. Bryan Cranston Reveals He May Appear in All The Way Sequel Robert Schenkkan, who won the Tony for his play All The Way, is writing a follow-up, The Great Society, which is set to premiere at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival later this year. Bryan Cranston, who won the Tony for his portrayal of LBJ in All The Way, revealed that he may reprise the role in the sequel: “Never say never.” Bryan Cranston Mark Rylance Eyeing Broadway’s Belasco Theatre for More Shakespeare Twelfth Night Tony winner Mark Rylance said that he didn’t do his usual poem when picking up his Tony award as “I thought you might be expecting it.” He also said that he’d “very much like to come back to the Belasco with more Shakespeare,” but that they’ve “not decided yet” which play. Star Files Jason Robert Brown Confirms Honeymoon Aiming to Bow on Broadway This Fall Jason Robert Brown, who picked up the Tonys for Best Orchestration and Best Score tonight for Bridges of Madison County, confirmed that his next project is Honeymoon in Vegas and that it is “unofficially coming in, in the fall.” Pending Great White Way theater availability and all those good things. Fingers crossed! Jessie Mueller Mark Rylancelast_img read more

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first_img Related Shows from $75.00 The Lion King Remember that time the Australian cast of The Lion King rocked an airplane and lifted everyone’s travel-weary spirits? Well, the Broadway cast just upped the ante—they gave ‘Life’ to NYC subway riders! The stars of the Broadway blockbuster offered A-train straphangers a gorgeous surprise when they showed off their considerate talents with the show’s opener “Circle of Life.” Watch them sing full-out while casually reading books and wearing headphones. Amazing! View Commentslast_img read more

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first_img View Comments Casting has been set for Dusty, a new multi-media show celebrating the music of 60’s pop icon Dusty Springfield. Written by Kim Weild and Duncan Sibbald with dramaturg Jack Bradley, the production is directed by Chris Cowey. Dusty will begin previews on May 25 and officially open June 3 at London’s Charing Cross Theatre. The world premiere will play a limited engagement through August 22.Ellie Ann-Lowe will play Mary O’Brien, with Francesca Jackson as Nancy, Stewart McCheyne as DJ Dave Dean, Ben Tolley as Johnny Franz, Leo Elso as Dion O’Brien/Tom Springfield, Joe Vetch as Douggie Reece, Joan Walker as Kay O’Brien, Graham Kent as Gerard ‘OB’ O’Brien, Tristan Pate as Vic Billings, Allyson Ava Brown as Martha Reeves, Danielle Kassarata as Maddie and Arabella Rodrigo as Norma. Rounding out the company will be Bex Leung, Cleo Jaeger and Marianna Neofitou.With original music by Dusty Springfield, audiences will see and hear Springfield on stage using 3-D technology and digital media. Dusty follows the highs and lows of Springfield’s rise from middle class suburban London to the recording of her seminal album Dusty in Memphis. Through the eyes of Nancy Jones, one of Dusty’s childhood friends, and other key figures who accompanied her on her journey, Dusty celebrates the life of one of Britain’s most influential recording artists.The production will feature set designs by Phil Lindley, lighting by Eugene O’Connor, choreography by Lyndon Lloyd and sound by Paul Gavin and James Nicholson. Musical direction is by Dean Austin.Another tuner based on the pop legend, Forever Dusty, closed off-Broadway in spring 2013.last_img read more

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first_imgThe Nanny Family Ties is heading from the boob tube to the stage, and the news has got us feeling major nostalgia vibes. Nothing warms the heart or tickles the funny bone quite like a classic family sitcom; who doesn’t absent-mindedly hum “Smelly Cat” or know the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air theme song by heart?  We asked you which classic television faves should get the theater treatment. Cue the laugh tracks, prepare to say “Awwwww” and take a look at your top 10 below! Friends That ’70s Show Bewitched Fresh Prince of Bel-Air Boy Meets Worldcenter_img The Brady Bunch Will & Grace Golden Girls Full House View Commentslast_img read more

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first_imgBen Platt & Rachel Bay Jones in the off-Broadway production of ‘Dear Evan Hansen'(Photo: Matthew Murphy) Related Shows View Comments Attention Dear Evan Hansen fans! Been listening to “Only Us” and “Waving Through a Window” on repeat? The Benj Pasek and Justin Paul musical will release a cast recording next year. The Atlantic Records album will be available digitally on February 3, 2017 and in stores on February 24.Starring Pitch Perfect fave and Broadway alum Ben Platt, the Broadway musical features a book by Steven Levenson. Directed by Michael Greif, Dear Evan Hansen is currently in previews at the Music Box Theatre. It is set to open officially on December 4.All his life Evan Hansen has felt invisible. To his peers, to the girl he loves, sometimes even to his own mother. But that was before he wrote the letter—that led to the incident—that started the lie—that ignited a movement—that inspired a community—and changed Evan’s status from the ultimate outsider into the somebody everyone wants to know. But how long can Evan keep his secret? And at what price?The cast of Dear Evan Hansen also includes Tony nominee Jennifer Laura Thompson, Rachel Bay Jones, Laura Dreyfuss, Mike Faist, Michael Park, Kristolyn Lloyd and Will Roland.center_img Dear Evan Hansen from $89.00last_img read more

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