Month: August 2019

first_img Photo by Greg DuBoisNowadays, it’s no secret that city living comes at a premium—and that’s especially true for urbanites with children in tow.A new report from real estate database company Zillow and childcare site Care.com calculated just how much more expensive it is to live in the city. On average, families in Boston pay $8,076 more per year to live in the city than in the suburbs. The report pegs the national average to be $9,073 more per year.“Deciding whether to live in the city or suburbs is a personal choice, but when you do the math, it’s easy to see why moving to the suburbs is about more than just a bigger yard–it can also save you a lot of money,” said Zillow’s chief economist, Svenja Gudell, in a statement. She explains that more than a third of families exceed their initial budget when buying a home, so it’s important to consider the cost of living beyond a home’s sticker price.To crunch the numbers, Zillow and Care.com pinpointed three common living expenses—property taxes, mortgage payments, and childcare costs—then calculated how much they cost around the country.The report notes that property taxes in Massachusetts’ suburbs ($28,408 per year) are about $7,600 lower than in Boston ($32,130 per year), and homes outside the city offer an extra 400 square feet of living space.However, there are two factors that don’t change much between the two: childcare costs and commuting times. The report says a commute from the suburbs averages at 30.6 minutes. In the city, it’s cut down only by a few minutes at 27.9 (hi, MBTA). Both cities have annual childcare costs that hover around $27,000.Questioning your distaste for the ‘burbs? See the full report here. Sign up for our weekly home and property newsletter, featuring homes for sale, neighborhood happenings, and more. Print 000 3/16/2017, 11:06 a.m. center_img Boston Families Pay $8,000 More to Live in the City Over the Suburbs A report from Zillow and Care.com laid out a few key differences between urbanites and suburban dwellers. By Madeline Bilis· Sign up for Home & Property newsletters. Design, real estate, and pretty things for living.*last_img read more

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first_imgHome Design This Is How You Live Small in Style Have you been dealt tight living quarters? Glean some inspiration from these pint-sized pads. 000 Sign up for Home & Property newsletters. Design, real estate, and pretty things for living.* Sign up for our weekly home and property newsletter, featuring homes for sale, neighborhood happenings, and more. By Casey Russell· center_img Print 8/9/2017, 8:00 a.m. Design: Wolf in Sheep Design / General Contractor: Kep Construction / Photo by Joyelle West for Boston Home Fall 2016It’s the inevitable truth: living in the city means compromising when it comes to space. In a historic town like Boston, apartments are unavoidably small, and poor choices in décor could have your space looking and feeling smaller than it actually is.If you’re planning on redecorating or just want to have room to breathe in your home, these impeccably designed small spaces will remind you that yes, it is possible to not feel like you’re living in a shoebox, and you can do it in style. Make the Most of It A kitchen also houses office space, ensuring that all 500 square feet in a South End apartment serve a purpose for the young family that inhabits it.Photo by Matthew Delphenich for Boston Home Fall 2014Photo by Matthew Delphenich for Boston Home Fall 2014last_img read more

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first_img By Julia Kacmarek· 000 7/2/2018, 12:06 p.m. Party Pics Photos: Faces of Family Businesses Panel Check out scenes from the May, 9, 2018, event at Top of the Hub’s Skywalk Observatory. On Wednesday, May 9, 2018, the Faces of Family Businesses – a special advertising section in Boston magazine’s May “Power” issue – came to life at a beautiful event hosted by Top of the Hub’s Skywalk Observatory. The evening featured a behind the scenes look at the leading family-owned businesses in and around Boston, and celebrated the passion and dedication of local business owners. An informative and entertaining panel discussion, moderated by Ted Clark, Director of the Northeastern University Center for Family Business, offered personal stories from Danny Paisner of ScrubaDub Auto Wash Centers, David Lipson of Boston magazine, David Lombardo of Lombardo’s, and Kara Dunlevy of New England Label. Guests enjoyed custom cocktails from Absolut Elyx, and wine from Barton & Guestier, along with a bountiful spread of delicious food from Top of the Hub. Entertainment Specialists provided a vibrant live violinist and DJ, and upon departure, all party-goers received a gift from Jarvis Appliance.Photography by Melissa Ostrow.Guests depart with gifts from Jarvis ApplianceTed Clark of Northeastern University Center for Family Business, Kara Dunlevy of New England Label, Danny Paisner of Scrubadub Auto Wash Center, David Lipson of Boston magazine and David Lombardo of Lombardo’sMagued Barsoum and Mariette Barsoum of Divine Design CenterLexi Lombara, Tracy Drislane and Lia Lombara of Colby Davis of BostonMiniature lobster rolls from Top of the HubAbsolut Elyx cocktailsBarton & Guestier Cotes de Provence RoséMike Amado and Emily Stewart from Entertainment SpecialistsMeaghan Ward and Kevin Ward of Tapestry restaurantFor more event highlights, check out the full event album here! Also, follow Boston magazine Events on Facebook and Instagram for future events and other happenings around the city at @bostonmagevents.center_img Get a compelling long read and must-have lifestyle tips in your inbox every Sunday morning — great with coffee! Print Sign up for Weekender. Arts, events, pop culture, and more.*last_img read more

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first_imgThe annual National Golf Foundation participation survey is out for 2018, and it revealed some encouraging trends regarding the game’s growth.For one, the number of people ages 6-and-up who played at least one round of golf last year increased modestly to 24.2 million from 23.8 million in 2017. That may seem like an inconsequential difference — and it is within the margin of error — but it’s the first measured increase in that category in 14 years.The 590-yard, par-5 seventh is new to Portrush’s reconfigured Dunluce course. The hole was nicked from the nearby Valley Links, Dunluce’s sister track.FeaturesThe Open Championship has (finally) returned to Royal Portrush, but its quest back was not so simplelast_img read more

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