Month: December 2019

first_imgJammu and Kashmir Liberation Front (JKLF) chief Yasin Malik was arrested by police here on Saturday.A spokesman of the JKLF said Malik was arrested from his residence in Maisuma area.Malik along with Hurriyat leaders Syed Ali Geelani and Mirwaiz Umer Farooq has been spearheading the separatist resistance in the Kashmir Valley for over one year.last_img

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first_imgUttar Pradesh Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath and four other BJP ministers will contest the by-poll elections to the Legislative Council to seal their membership in the government.Mr. Adityanath and four other ministers are required to get elected as MLA or MLC by September 19, as none is a member of any House. They took oath on March 19. The BJP central election committee on Wednesday announced five candidates for the upcoming MLC by-polls. Apart from the CM, the other four are deputy CMs Keshav Prasad Maurya and Dinesh Sharma, Transport Minister Swatantra Dev Singh and Waqf and Haj Minister Mohsin Raza.They are expected to have a smooth sailing even if a contest is necessitated given the unassailable majority the BJP has in the Assembly. Along with its two allies, Apna Dal and Suheldev Bharatiya Samaj Party, the ruling BJP has 324 out of 403 seats. The figure was reduced by one after BJP MLA Mathura Prasad Pal died in July after a prolonged illness.The schedule for the by-polls released by the Election Commission has also provided relief to the BJP clearing the way for the entry of all five of its candidates. State Chief Election Officer Amrita Soni had on August 24 announced by-polls for four MLC seats that were vacated after the sudden resignation of SP leaders Yashwant Singh, Bukkal Nawab, Sarojini Agarwal and Ashok Bajpai. The tenure of Mr. Nawab and Mr. Singh would have ended in 2022, while that of Ms. Agarwal and Mr. Bajpai in 2021. All four joined the BJP a few days later.The EC had issued vacancies for only four spots even as the total number of MLC posts needed to be filled was six. However, the EC had refused to hold elections for the remaining two seats, vacated by BSP MLC Thakur Jaiveer Singh and SP MLC (who joined the BSP) Ambika Chaudhary saying they had less than a year remaining in their tenure.If this situation had continued, only four out of the five BJP Ministers would get elected as MLCs and the speculation doing the rounds was that Mohsin Raza, the lone Muslim Minister in the Yogi Council, would be sacrificed. However, the EC on Tuesday issued another schedule announcing that a by-poll would also be held for the seat vacated by Thakur Jaiveer Singh, taking the number of by-poll seats to five. Mr. Jaiveer Singh had also joined the BJP. The EC has not announced a by-poll for the seat vacated by Ambika Chaudhary even as his tenure as that of Mr. Jaiveer Singh both end next May.last_img read more

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first_imgBarely two days after senior Kannada journalist Gauri Lankesh was murdered in Bengaluru, a journalist in Bihar’s Arwal district was shot at and robbed of ₹1 lakh on Thursday by two motorcycle-borne assailants. The incident took place 60 km from here.Police officials said Pankaj Mishra, who was working for the local edition of Hindi newspaper Rashtriya Sahara, was returning after withdrawing money from a bank when he was attacked.Mr. Mishra was later admitted to the Patna Medical College and Hospital (PMCH) and is said to be out of danger.Dilip Kumar, Arwal Superintendent of Police told The Hindu that the assailants fired twice at Mr. Mishra. When he collapsed on the road the assailants fled with the money.One of the two robbers, Kundan Mahto, was later arrested, Mr. Kumar said. Police are searching for the other assailant, Ambika Mahto.Asked if it was a case of robbery, the SP said, “it will be known only after the investigation.” However, local police officials said, “prima facie it’s a case of robbery or some personal enmity.”The injured journalist was first taken to a primary health centre from where he was shifted to the Arwal Sadar hospital. Later, he was referred to PMCH, said the SP.The journalist alleged that the attackers had links with a local ruling party JD(U) legislator.Speaking to a news channel, Mr. Mishra said that since he had written several stories against Kundan Mahto, son of a personal assistant to the JD(U) MLA, in his newspaper, he targeted him.Earlier in 2016, a senior journalist in Siwan district Rajdeo Ranjan who was working with the Hindi newspaper Hindustan, was gunned down, a few yards from his office, allegedly by henchmen of former Siwan RJD MP Mohd Shahabuddin.last_img read more

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first_imgThe bodies of three men, who allegedly died of strangulation, were today found from a farm house in Gurgaon’s posh Sohna locality, police said. The police were alerted about the incident in the morning when some female workers reached the farm house for their daily routine work. The deceased hail from Uttar Pradesh and have been identified as Mohit, Dharmendra and Allahudin. Mohit and Dharmendra. They had visited the farm house last month also. While Mohit was found dead in the kitchen, Dharmendra’s body was recovered from the cricket ground and Allahudin’s from behind the bushes within the premises of the farm house, the police said. The police were suspecting that dacoity could be the reason of the triple murder. Some valuables were missing from the farm house, situated along the Gurgaon-Sohna road at Kherla village, which suggests a possible loot, the police said.“Prima facie it appears that the Bawaria gang could be involved in it as it has committed such crimes in the past in places including Mewat district. There are no CCTV cameras installed inside the premises. We have registered a case against unknown persons,” a senior police officer said.last_img read more

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first_imgIn what appears to be a case of poor choice of words, a Class 8 reference book described freedom fighter Bal Gangadhar Tilak as the “Father of Terrorism”. Printed by a Mathura-based publisher, the book is used by private English-medium schools affiliated to the Rajasthan Board of Secondary Education (RBSE). The Rajasthan State Textbook Board publishes books in Hindi, leaving students no other option but to use reference books. Tilak demonstrated a path towards national movement, therefore, he is called as the father of terrorism, reads page 267 of chapter 22 of the book. The description is part of sub-topic “Incidents of National Movement during 18th and 19th century”. “Tilak clearly believed that we cannot achieve anything just by pleading the British officers. Through Shivaji and Ganpati festivals, Tilak aroused unique awareness in the country. He instilled the mantra of freedom among the masses, due to which he became a thorn in the eyes of the British,” the book reads. Officials at the Student Advisor Publication Private Limited, which publishes the book, said the mistake had been rectified in the revised edition. The translators made the mistake. It had come to our notice and was corrected in the revised edition last month. The first edition was published last year, Rajpal Singh, a production official at the publisher’s office, said. Dr R.S Khangarot, professor of history in Agrawal PG College, Jaipur, said Tilak awakened the people of the country during the Home Rule movement in 1916. ‘Mistake unacceptable’ Such a mistake in books is unacceptable, even if it was an error in translation, he said. Retired professor of history, Rajasthan University, B.L. Gupta said British author Ignatius Valentine Chirol had described Tilak as “the father of Indian unrest”. “It is derogatory to call Tilak the father of terrorism,” he said.last_img read more

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first_imgA total of seven Maoists, including two women, have been killed in two separate encounters in Odisha’s Kandhamal and Balangir districts since Saturday night.Security forces found another body on Monday morning, after they had recovered four bodies following an exchange of fire with Communist Party of India-Maoist cadres in the Sudurukumpa forest of the Kandhamal district on Sunday afternoon.The gun battle comes a day after two left-wing extremists — divisional committee member Sanjeeb who was carrying a reward on ₹5 lakh on his head, and Rakesh, an area committee member carrying a reward of ₹4 lakh — were killed in an exchange of fire with the security forces on Saturday.Special Operations Group, an anti-Maoist force, and District Voluntary Force launched an operation following a tip-off about a possible meeting of Communist Party of India (Maoist) cadres at Godanki village in Sudurukumpa forest.Two women among deadKandhamal Superintendent of Police Prateek Singh said two woman Maoists were among the five killed in the exchange of fire. Five guns, including an AK-47 and two INSAS rifles, were recovered from the spot. The names of the deceased had not been revealed till Monday evening.In the wake of the two encounters, Union Home Minister Rajnath Singh spoke to Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik on Monday and reviewed the security situation in the State, an official said. During the telephonic conversation, the Chief Minister briefed the Home Minister on the steps taken by the State government to deal with the Maoists, the official said. Mr. Singh also spoke to Odisha Director General of Police Rajendra Prasad Sharma and appreciated the successful operations against the Maoists.(With PTI inputs)last_img read more

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first_imgPrime Minister Narendra Modi is likely to attend four rallies during BJP’s December “rath yatra” in West Bengal to give a thrust to the party’s campaign in the State ahead of the 2019 general elections, the party’s State unit said on Monday.BJP president Amit Shah will kick-start the three rath yatras in the State —Coochbehar district in the north on December 7, from Gangasagar in the south on December 9 and from Tarapith temple in Birbhum district on December 14.Target 22 The “rath yatra” would cover all the 42 Lok Sabha constituencies in West Bengal, where the BJP has set a target of winning over 22 seats. “Prime Minister Narendra Modi is likely to attend four rallies in Bengal during our rath yatra campaign in the State. We have informed the party central leadership and the PMO. The final dates are yet to be fixed. Let’s see what happens,” West Bengal BJP president Dilip Ghosh said. Mr. Modi is also scheduled to hold a public meeting at the historic Brigade Parade Ground in Kolkata early next year.last_img read more

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first_imgHolding the State government and municipal corporation of Sangli liable for the death of a five-year-old three years back, the Bombay High Court on Tuesday directed directed them to pay ₹50,000 as compensation with 8% interest since 2015.A division bench of Justices Abhay Oka and Sandeep Shinde was hearing a plea filed by Maruti Hale,30, and Dhanamma Hale, 28, a labourer who lost their only child, Tejas to five stray dogs on December 22, 2015.The petition filed on their behalf by advocate Padmanabh Pise says, “As per the provisions of The Animal Birth Control (Dogs) Rules 2001, the municipal corporation is duty bound to observe the rules and take steps accordingly. As per the rules, the local authority shall sterilised and immunised to the street dogs and the corporation is required to form a committee which shall be known as monitoring committee.”“The committee shall have a representative of the Public Health Department of local authority, a representative of the Animal Welfare Department if any of local authority, a veterinary doctor or representative of District Society for Prevention of Cruelty of Animals, and at least two representatives from animal welfare organisations operating within the local authority.”The plea also points out that the rules came into force in 2001 but till date no committee has been constituted for monitoring dog bite cases. The petitioners sought a compensation of ₹20 lakh from the court.The court said, “This incident is ‘shocking’ and noted that the State and the municipal corporation are liable to pay the compensation under Right to Life, Article 21 (no person shall be deprived of his life or personal liberty except according to procedure established by law) of the Indian Constitution.”The court then directed that the petitioners be paid ₹50,000 and 8% interest since from December 2015 within a week. It also directed the municipal corporation to set up a monitoring committee by January 31, 2019.last_img read more

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first_imgA life-altering harshest 40-day winter spell, known locally as Chillai Kalan, began in the Kashmir region on Friday, as the sub-zero temperature froze parts of many water bodies, including the famous Dal Lake, and water taps, as it set off a cold wave across the State.J&K’s summer capital Srinagar witnessed a minimum temperature of -4.4 degree Celsius on Thursday night. The sub zero temperature resulted in the formation of a sheath of ice on vehicles.In tourist hotspots of Pahalgam and Gulmarg, the minimum temperature hovered around -7.5 degree C and -6 degree C.“There will be no change in the cold wave in the next 24 hours,” said a meteorological official.In Kargil and Leh, the minimum temperature in many parts has dipped to -10 degree C, forcing a large population to shift to dry latrines.Due to the severe cold wave, people in the Valley prefer to start their day very late in the morning. Even shops and markets opened after 10 a.m.People are already resorting to modern as well as traditional modes of heating, which include wood and coal driven heaters and hamams, a facility in houses in the Valley where fire is put beneath the surface to keep rooms warm.The winter spell also results in lower electricity generation in J&K, as the glaciers in upper reaches turn into mountains of ice and the water discharge is negligible into rivers and streams.The reduced electricity supply exacerbates locals’ hardships and they find it hard to keep the houses warm. “Kashmir is also reeling under an unprecedented power crisis. Students and the elderly are facing immense hardships due to the unsteady supply of electricity,” said National Conference (NC) provincial spokesperson Imran Nabi Dar.last_img read more

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first_imgBeards are everywhere these days. From the urban lumberjacks of Brooklyn to the hirsute hackers of San Francisco, men’s faces have taken a turn for the hairy. But according to one theory of evolutionary population dynamics, the look is destined to die down because of its own popularity. And now an experiment involving 3 dozen bearded men lends credence to the prediction.For most biological traits—stronger wings for catching prey, longer legs for evading predators—it doesn’t matter how rare or common the trait is in a population of organisms. But sometimes it’s bad to have a trait that’s too popular. A classic example is the coloration of guppies, in which rare color variants are less likely to be noticed by predators. This gives the nonconformist fish a slight fitness advantage because predators focus on the most common hues, allowing the unorthodox coloration to be passed on and spread in the population. But once the odd coloration gets too common, the advantage disappears—predators start to chow down on the formerly cryptic fish and the cycle begins anew. This mechanism, called negative frequency-dependent selection, is one explanation for how diversity is maintained in populations despite natural selection constantly filtering for the fittest set of traits.Facial hair is a trickier trait to explain than wings or fins, because rather than being determined early in life by genes, it is determined by behavior. In the case of beards, it is the decision to shave or not to shave. But the same logic can apply if the behavior has an influence on the choice of potential mates.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)A team led by Zinnia Janif, an evolutionary biologist at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, realized that it wasn’t enough to just measure the attractiveness of faces with or without beards. As any biologist will tell you, beards are indeed sexy. The question is, does the sexiness of beards depend on the hairiness of the rest of the males in the population? Or is the allure of a beard the same no matter what?To find out, the researchers recruited 36 men who were willing to grow beards. Then they took photographs of the men’s faces under identical lighting conditions at intervals: clean-shaven, light stubble (5 days), heavy stubble (10 days), and full hipster beard (4 weeks). They showed these photographs to 1453 women and 213 men—all of the women self-identified as either bisexual or heterosexual, and all of the men self-identified as heterosexual. The subjects scored the faces on an attractiveness scale commonly used in psychology experiments.But there was a catch: The frequency of beardiness varied in each set of photographs, ranging from rare to common. Some subjects viewed sets of photos in which most of the men were clean-shaven, while others saw mostly the heavily stubbled or bearded versions, and others saw intermediate ranges of stubble and beardiness. If frequency-dependent selection plays no role in facial hair trends, the context shouldn’t matter.But the context did matter. When facial hair was rare among faces, beards and heavy stubble were rated about 20% more attractive. And when beards were common, clean-shaven faces enjoyed a similar bump, the team reports online today in Biology Letters. The effect on judgment was the same for men and women.“This study breaks new ground,” says Peter Frost, an anthropologist at the Interuniversity Centre for Aboriginal Studies and Research in Quebec City, Canada. Although previous studies have shown that people prefer novelty for certain traits, such as the color of clothing, this study shows “that the novelty effect applies not only to colors but also to other visible features [of the body],” he says. But hipsters shouldn’t let their beards get too gnarly. “There are certainly limits to this effect,” Frost says. “Something can be novel but also disgusting.”last_img read more

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first_imgThe National Aquarium is considering moving its eight Atlantic bottlenose dolphins to a marine sanctuary, The Baltimore Sun reports. The popular tourist site, located in Baltimore, Maryland, says that it is responding to concerns that keeping such cognitively advanced animals in captivity is inhumane. Scientists have recently sparred over whether dolphins, whales, and other cetaceans belong in aquariums, with some claiming that the confined spaces cause stress, depression, and disease, and other stating that removing these animals would kill important research. The public itself may be souring on such displays, spurred, in part, by the 2013 documentary, Blackfish, which explored the ethics of keeping killer whales in captivity. The National Aquarium has hired a team of consultants to advise on the fate of its dolphins and to help it reimagine the aquarium experience. “We know so much more today about the animals and about our evolving audience,” aquarium CEO John Racanelli told The Sun. “We have to evolve.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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first_imgThe Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), the top-priority ground-based instrument for U.S. astronomers, has gotten the green light to go ahead with construction, with a view to seeing its first light in 2019. On 1 August, the National Science Foundation moved to release the first major chunk of construction funding—$27.5 million—for the $473 million project. The Department of Energy will also chip in about $165 million for the scope’s camera and related instruments.LSST has a highly unusual design, with a very wide field of view so it can scan the entire sky every few nights. “This concept is the next stage in the technological revolution that is going on in astronomy,” says Gerry Gilmore of the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. Instead of looking at distant and faint objects for long periods to get enough light, LSST will look at things that change fast. “This next step will look at a big enough patch of sky and cover it repeatedly and rapidly. We’re all looking forward to it,” Gilmore says.The development of LSST has been going on for more than a decade. In the National Research Council’s 2010 decadal survey of astronomy and astrophysics, researchers put it at the top of their wish list for ground-based telescopes. LSST is expected to begin full science operations in 2022 and will survey the sky for 10 years from Cerro Pachón in northern Chile.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)“After a rigorous design and development phase, the project team is ready to get down and dirty and actually build this amazing facility,” said LSST Project Manager Victor Krabbendam in a statement. Gilmore says that the United Kingdom is now negotiating joining the project as an international partner.LSST will view a patch of sky 3.5° across; that’s seven times the diameter of the sun or moon. It will focus light onto a 3.2-gigapixel camera that takes an exposure every 20 seconds. This wide viewing angle is achieved by having three mirrors rather than the usual two: An 8.4-meter primary mirror reflects light onto a 3.4-meter secondary and from there onto a 5-meter tertiary mirror sitting in a large hole in the middle of the primary. So the primary is like a giant ring. “It’s a big telephoto lens,” Gilmore says.LSST will map out the faint variable stars that are used to measure distances in the local universe and the flashgunlike supernovae that help gauge longer distances. It will measure weak gravitational lensing deep in space as a way of detecting dark energy and dark matter. Researchers will use it to study the flashes of light given out when black holes, including the giant ones at the centers of galaxies, consume stars and other material. Closer to home, LSST will map near-Earth asteroids and Kuiper belt objects in the far solar system.One of the project’s biggest challenges will be coping with the volume of data the telescope will produce, far too much to be processed by human beings. “This is big data in extremis. It’ll be like a gigantic video stream pouring down from the sky,” Gilmore says. The telescope is expected to produce about 30 terabytes of data per night and advanced data-mining techniques will need to be developed to find objects of interest in the stream of images. Automated systems will also be needed to spot fast-changing objects in the sky and alert other telescopes to home in on them quickly for more detailed study, similar to the existing system for studying gamma ray bursts. “We’ll need to move another couple of steps up the complexity ladder,” Gilmore says.last_img read more

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first_imgThe sharp decline of rupee against dollar observed in the last few weeks has impacted Indians and NRIs equally. However, as Indians cringe at their accounts, the NRIs have been gladly looking out for investment opportunities in the country owing to more rupees in their hand.The recent fall of the Indian currency went as low as 74.46 against the US dollar. But this has come with a silver lining as far as the Indian real estate sector is concerned. With so much more to spare, the NRI investment enquires and even transactions have spiked up remarkably.Read it at News18 Related Itemslast_img read more

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first_imgA five-member delegation from Punjab on Thursday met Meghalaya Home Minister James K. Sangma, urging him to ensure one-time resolution of the issues concerning the Sikh settlers in Shillong. The delegation, led by Punjab minister Sukhjinder Singh Randhawa, went to Meghalaya after reports emerged that members of the Sikh community were told to leave the State by the authorities. It requested that the High Powered Committee (HPC) set up by the Meghalaya government on the issue take into account all genuine concerns of the Sikh families before reaching any conclusion.Security a concernAn official statement said the delegation requested the Home Minister to ensure security of the hundreds of Sikh families who have been residing in the Punjabi Lane area of Shillong for decades now. The statement also said that Mr. Sangma assured the delegation that all efforts would be made to protect the Sikhs in Meghalaya.last_img read more

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first_imgBJP president Amit Shah on Wednesday appointed party vice-president Avinash Rai Khanna as in-charge of the party’s poll preparations in Jammu and Kashmir, a day after the core group from the State unit was told to begin preparations for the Assembly elections. Announcing the decision in New Delhi, general secretary Arun Singh said directions for ramping up booth level preparations, specifically in the Kashmir Valley, had also been given to the leaders. This, even as the Lok Sabha had, in this Parliament session itself, voted to extend the President’s Rule by six months. The core group on Tuesday evening was also told by BJP working president J P Nadda that the campaign should revolve around the development work done under the Central rule in the State, the successful conclusion of panchayat polls and the strong action taken against the Jammu and Kashmir Bank on allegations of corruption and questionable transactions.last_img read more

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first_imgHiralal Solanki is waiting for the backwaters in the swelling Narmada to recede so that he could return home. Cooped up in a 10 feet-by-10 tin shelter at a relief camp with two younger brothers, a sister-in-law, and an assortment of recovered household items stacked around, he refuses to leave for Gujarat, where his parents were resettled more than two decades ago. Just eight, and a minor, in 1994, when his parents were given a five-acre plot in Panchmahal district, 192 km away, he and his siblings were left behind in the care of relatives. Today, leaving behind two shops and a ramshackle hut at Kotda village in Madhya Pradesh’s Dhar district that faces submersion, the families of Mr. Solanki and 130 others have shifted to the camp set up by the Narmada Valley Development Authority (NVDA) in the neighbouring Nisarpur, which too is facing submergence. Uncertainty remains As Gujarat continues to raise storage at the Sardar Sarovar Dam at a menacing pace, those residing in 178 affected upstream villages of Madhya Pradesh stare at uncertainty. On Saturday, the level in the dam had risen to 135.9 metres, well above the 135 metres that was to be filled by the end of this month as per the schedule prescribed by the Narmada Control Authority (NCA).Now, Mr. Solanki sits on the street selling pans, made possible with the help of some capital from a camp neighbour, who lent ₹20,000 at 5% interest. “I make just ₹50-60 a day now. Previously, it was ₹1,500,” he said. “Back at the village, the same friend lent us money at no interest.”“The allotted land is arid and we’re treated like outsiders in Gujarat,” said Mr. Solanki’s mother Durga Bai, who has come on a visit to care for her youngest son, who is suffering from typhoid. “We don’t know their language, and are often not allowed to pass through their fields.”Nowhere to go Rajesh Bhagole, 29, an agricultural labourer who shifted with his wife to the camp on July 12 from Nisarpur, said, “Why should we shift elsewhere when we were born here, studied here and vote here? I received no land when my father did. We have nowhere else to go. So, we’ll return to our houses when the water recedes.”As they had limited space to themselves, Mr. Bhagole explained that they had rented a room separately for ₹1,000 a month to store household goods.“Rehabilitated people continue to live in acquired houses [that the project authorities had acquired],” said Pawan Kumar Sharma, Commissioner, Narmada Valley Development Authority (NVDA). “We can’t force them to shift. Therefore, they usually return once the water recedes.”According to the NVDA, of the 37,729 project affected families in Madhya Pradesh, while 32,174 had been rehabilitated in Madhya Pradesh, 5,555 had been resettled in Gujarat. Recently, the Madhya Pradesh government admitted that more villages in the State were facing submergence than estimated earlier. At a makeshift school in the camp, 150 students shift to a neighbouring gaushala whenever the heat makes the tin classrooms with no fans, impossible to sit in. “I am waiting to return to my village school where we had fans,” said Payal Verma, who is staying at the camp alwith her parents, who are agricultural labourers, and a brother and grandparents.last_img read more

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first_imgBattered by heavy rainfall for the third consecutive day, Bihar recorded at least 18 deaths on Sunday due to inundated streets, water-logged railway tracks and marooned business establishments.The State capital continued to be among the worst affected, with some parts submerged in water levels rising up to the chest and its residents being rescued with the help of municipal cranes normally used for moving earth.“It is nature’s fury before which man is often helpless. We are, however, trying our best. The problem is we have no idea how long the downpour which caps a prolonged dry spell causing a drought-like situation is going to last.“Even the weather department seems clueless, making different predictions at different points of time,” Chief Minister Nitish Kumar told reporters.He was speaking after holding a meeting with officials including those of the disaster management department where he also interacted with officials in the other districts through video conferencing.He later drove through the water-logged streets and the worst-affected localities issuing instructions to officials.The cranes turned saviours as these were used to pick up people — many of them girls and boys from far-off districts who came here for studies and put up at hostels — stranded in places rendered inaccessible through normal modes of transport. Business has been hit badly as even drug stores were forced to keep the shutters down for fear of the stocks getting damaged and even swept away by the gushing water.The East Central Railway, head-quartered in Hajipur and covering most parts of the State, said many trains had been cancelled, short-terminated or diverted on account of water-logging and damage caused to bridges.ECR Chief Public Relations Officer also said, “All trains passing through Patna junction have been mandated to stop at Danapur as well. The move has been taken to bring some relief to the people who are greatly inconvenienced by the water-logging inside and around the junction.Air traffic has also been affected as GoAir announced on Twitter that it had diverted its flights from Mumbai to Lucknow and those from Delhi to Varanasi.The air carrier, along with IndiGo, issued advisories to passengers from the city to leave for the airport well in advance, apprehending traffic snarls.SpiceJet also urged passengers to “keep a check on flight status” since movement of flights could get affected “due to bad weather in Patna”.last_img read more

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