Tag: Starr

first_img Clemson OL John Simpson, who is cosplaying as Trevor Lawrence at ACC Media Day, says that Notre Dame was a tougher test than Alabama.Clemson crushed both teams in the College Football Playoff. After casting aside the Fighting Irish 30-3, the Tigers stunned ‘Bama 44-16.LOTS of questions here at Media Day about the Alabama remarks about Clemson/Clemson not getting its credit. John Simpson says Notre Dame -not Bama- was the best team Clemson played.— Grace Raynor (@gmraynor) July 17, 2019I assume Simpson was taking a shot back at Moses with this quote, though by score, he’s not wrong. The Tigers beat Notre Dame by 27 and Alabama by 28.Of course, by that metric, Syracuse was the toughest test that Clemson faced. The Orange nearly stunned Clemson for a second straight season during the regular season, giving up the lead late to fall 27-23.Either way, the Tigers went 15-0, capping one of the most impressive seasons in modern college football. If Alabama players truly think that was a fluky result, they may very well get their shot at a rematch yet again this winter. Notre Dame RB Dexter Williams rushes against Clemson.ARLINGTON, TEXAS – DECEMBER 29: A.J. Terrell #8 of the Clemson Tigers tackles Dexter Williams #2 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish in the second half during the College Football Playoff Semifinal Goodyear Cotton Bowl Classic at AT&T Stadium on December 29, 2018 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)Alabama and Clemson don’t share a conference, and if they face each other yet again, it will be in the post-season. That didn’t stop the two teams from firing some barbs today.ACC and SEC Media Days featured Clemson and Alabama respectively today. Naturally, players from those teams were asked about their national title game counterparts.Crimson Tide linebacker Dylan Moses opened things up with a controversial take. While ‘Bama beat Georgia and was blown out by Clemson, he said that the Dawgs were the tougher team to face.Clemson has responded in kind from Charlotte.last_img read more

Read more

first_imgWomen who are hoping to conceive should go on a diet years before, new research suggests.Writing in The Lancet, medics said the vast majority of women of reproductive age were not nutritionally prepared for pregnancy – putting the long-term health of their children at risk.Those thinking about starting a family are often advised to make lifestyle changes, such as cutting out alcohol, and taking dietary supplements, around three months before attempting to conceive.But the experts said one of the most crucial factors was for women to be a healthy weight before conception – often meaning diet and lifestyle overhauls need to start years earlier.And they said school children should be taught about the importance of the right diet to prepare for parenthood.Researchers calculated the proportion of women of reproductive age in Britain who are nutritionally prepared for pregnancy, using data from 509 women of reproductive age in the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey.In total, 96 per cent were found to have iron and folate dietary intakes below the recommendation for pregnancy. Such shortfalls can be tackled in less than a month. Show more Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. But lead authors from University College London said more longer-term efforts were needed to tackle soaring levels of obesity among parents-to-be.center_img Research suggests more than one quarter of pregnant women are overweight or obese.Excess weight in pregnancy increases the lifelong risk of cardiovascular, metabolic, immune and neurological diseases in subsequent children.Links have also been made between male obesity and poor sperm quality, which may also increase the risk to future children, though the evidence is less clear. Lead author Professor Judith Stephenson, of University College London, said: “The preconception period is a critical time when parental health – including weight, metabolism, and diet – can influence the risk of future chronic disease in children, and we must now re-examine public health policy to help reduce this risk.”While the current focus on risk factors, such as smoking and excess alcohol intake, is important, we also need new drives to prepare nutritionally for pregnancy for both parents.”Professor Janice Rymer, Vice President of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG), said she was “extremely concerned” by the findings.“This highly significant research presents stark evidence of the importance of nutrition and lifestyle in the preconception period,” she said.  last_img read more

Read more