Month: January 2021

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s College Student Government Association (SGA) passed legislation outlining the future structure of Senate and announced the dates of the upcoming College-wide elections in their meeting Tuesday. The student body election period will take place from Feb. 27 to March 1. Candidates for SGA, Residence Hall Association, Student Activities Board, Student Diversity Board, student body president and vice president may begin campaigning Feb. 26. The results of the elections on March 1 will be announced the following day. Senate and Class Board candidates may begin campaigning March 4 for the March 8 elections, with results announced March 9. Current juniors, sophomores and first years can campaign for Senate positions during this period. Incoming first years will round out the Senate with elections in September. SGA members will staff an informational table from Feb. 13-17 to introduce students to the future structure of SGA. Though the table’s location has yet to be determined, SGA members will inform them about the election process, executive secretary Emma Brink said. “We are committed to getting as many students as possible to participate in the elections, whether by running or voting,” Brink said. Brink said SGA hopes the presence of the informational table will increase voter participation in the upcoming election. Part of SGA’s new structure will involve incorporating creative ways to get more students to vote and promoting enthusiasm about running for Senate. In its meeting, SGA also approved legislation outlining the new structure of the Senate, which will now be comprised of fifteen students who represent diverse interests and student involvement at Saint Mary’s. The students will be divided by class year to guarantee fair representation of the student body, with positions allocated for four seniors, four juniors, four sophomores and three first years. “SGA is extremely excited to introduce the new structure to students and promote the new opportunities that students will have on the Senate,” Brink said.last_img read more

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first_imgSaint Mary’s students gained a glimpse into competing views of feminism last night during the lecture titled “Warrior Women vs. Ragpickers: Divergent Paths in Contemporary Feminism” last night in the Stapleton Lounge. Mary Caputi, political science professor at California State University Long Beach, explored two camps of contemporary feminism in her lecture and said critical thinking should play a more significant role in analyzing modern feminism. Caputi also taught at Saint Mary’s College in the early 1990s. “A lot in our culture equates feminism with consumerism, liberation and facile abuses of power. We need to use critical thinking skills to analyze what is really presented in feminism,” Caputi said. Caputi said the two schools of thought in contemporary feminism can best be described by the nicknames of the “New Girl Order” and “ragpicker feminism.” “New Girl Order can also be referred to as wake-up-and-smell-the-lip-gloss feminism or stiletto feminism,” Caputi said. “This type is very much centered on the motto ‘feminism is whatever I as an individual say it is.’” Caputi said this school of thought often lacks the skills of critical thinking. “This feminism celebrates the neoliberal of current capital and global capital,” Caputi said. “It often lacks the ability to step back and ask why money, power and sex are being offered.” Caputi said the New Girl Order is based on rugged American individualism. It aggressively uses power and risks buying into models of masculinity, she said. Caputi said she believes ragpicker feminism, the second school of thought, is the better path in the diverging road of contemporary feminism. This feminism focuses on more than the individual through an analytical lens, she said. “Feminists should be like ragpickers,” Caputi said. “They need to have their eyes open to focus on what got left out. They need to search for what is part of the mix, but didn’t get a voice.” Ragpicker feminism aims to help those who are oppressed and specifically looks at economic and sociopolitical political problems within the global community, she said. “This school of thought wants to use critical thinking to help anyone who identifies as a feminist, whether it be a man or women, ask the question of how power is being used,” Caputi said. Stacy Davis, associate professor of religious studies and coordinator for the Women’s Studies Program, said it is important to recognize feminism in its multiple contemporary forms. “On this campus specifically, I think a lot of people believe feminism is something that other people did,” Davis said. “It is often marginalized or diminished without truly knowing the different ways you can be a feminist and use feminist theory.” Caputi said society needs to practice ragpicker feminism more than New Girl Order feminism. “It is necessary that we adopt the mindset of the ragpicker because feminism is not an issue only about women, but also issues that concern the world,” she said.last_img read more

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first_imgThe Notre Dame Chinese Students & Scholars Association (NDCSSA) will host a celebration in honor of the Chinese New Year tonight from 7-9 p.m., in Washington Hall.According to its website, the NDCSSA was created in 1991 as a “non-profit and non-political organization of all Chinese students and scholars.” NDCSSA is the largest foreign students and scholars club at Notre Dame with over 400 members.NDCSSA president Bo Hong said the first Chinese New Year Gala on campus took place in 1992 and moved to its current venue, Washington Hall in 2009.“The content of the gala is different every year,” Hong said. “Generally, there will be Chinese traditional choreography, traditional instrument performance, history drama, pop song singing, Fashion shows — including modern style and Chinese traditional costumes of different dynasties in Chinese history — playing games with the audience, and so forth.”This year’s celebration marks the beginning of the Year of the Goat. Hong said the Chinese Spring Festival, or Lunar New Year, is based on the lunar calendar and can be traced back thousands of years.“Legend has it that the Emperor invented the calendar in 2637 B.C.,” Hong said. “It was recorded that Chinese started to celebrate Chinese New Year from about 2000 B.C. They started to celebrate on the first day of the lunar calendar based on Emperor Wu Di’s almanac of the Han Dynasty.”Hong said this celebration recognized and responded to a mythical beast called Nian.“The beast Nian could infiltrate houses silently to prey on humans,” Hong said. “To keep Nian away, red-paper couplets are pasted on doors, torches are lit, and firecrackers are set off throughout the night, because Nian is said to fear the color red, the light of fire, and loud noises.”Hong said the Koreans and Vietnamese also celebrate their New Years on the same day.“In Vietnam, the first three days [of the New Year] are public holidays,” Hong said. “A few countries around the world regularly issue postage stamps or numismatic coins to commemorate Chinese New Year.”These countries — including Australia, Canada, Christmas Island, El Salvador, France, the Phillipines and the U.S. — recognize the significant number of their citizens who are of Chinese origin in their tribute to the Chinese New Year. Hong said this recognition is similar to the NDCSSA’s objective in hosting the gala.The Chinese New Year Gala is open to all students, whether or not they are part of the NDCSSA, and attendees are welcome to leave early or stay as long as they want. Admission is free.Tags: Chinese, Chinese New Year, lunar new year, NDCSSA, Notre Dame Chinese Students & Scholars Associationlast_img read more

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first_imgEditor’s Note: A version of this story was published on March 27.The University announced Fr. Gregory J. Boyle, the founder and executive director of Homeboy Industries, as the 2017 recipient of Notre Dame’s Laetare Medal in a press release March 26.The Laetare medal is awarded annually by the University to an American Catholic figure “whose genius has ennobled the arts and sciences, illustrated the ideals of the Church and enriched the heritage of humanity.”According to the press release, Homeboy Industries — which Boyle founded in Los Angeles in 1988 — is “now the largest gang intervention, rehabilitation and re-entry program in the world.” Each year, the organization helps 10,000 men and women who are struggling with violence and being cycled through the prison system to “develop the strength and skills to transform their lives and become contributing members of society.”“At Homeboy, we try to hold up a mirror and say, ‘Here’s who you are; you’re exactly what God had in mind when he made you,’” Boyle said in the release. “Then you have this moment with people when they become that truth.”University President Fr. John Jenkins said in the release that Boyle’s decades of work made him an “inspiring” figure in the Catholic Church.“For nearly 30 years, Father Boyle has served men and women who have been incarcerated and involved with gangs, and, in doing so, has helped them to discover the strength and hope necessary to transform their lives,” he said in the release. “Father Boyle’s solidarity with our sisters and brothers at the margins of society offers an inspiring model of faith in action. We are grateful for the witness of his life and honored to bestow this award on him.”Boyle said in the press release that he is honored to receive the 2017 Laetare Medal.“You want a university to be in the world what you invite the world to become,” he said. “Notre Dame is like that. It’s an honor to be recognized as the Laetare Medal recipient and I’m very grateful.”Tags: Commencement 2017, Fr. Greg Boyle, Homeboy Industries, Laetare Medallast_img read more

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first_imgThe new Notre Dame women’s club basketball team has competed in four tournaments in their inaugural semester. The team is comprised of a fluctuating 15 to 20 members and coached by Rob Coloney, the director of Graduate Career Services. Two of the four tournaments were in Chicago, and one was for regionals at Dayton University, where the club received a free automatic bid to nationals in two weeks in Wichita, Kansas. Most recently, the club hosted a tournament on Notre Dame’s campus, sophomore Kate Mulshine, who serves as vice president of the club, said. The formation of the club team has been in the works since the fall of 2017, junior Caroline VanKirk said. VanKirk said she was connected with current senior Megan Kamm by Club Sports last spring. They now serve as co-presidents of the club. “I had talked to a couple people at club sports about [the prospect of a women’s club basketball team] in the spring of last year, and then they gave me Megan’s contact because Megan had been involved in trying to start it the previous fall with two girls who ended up walking onto the actual team,” VanKirk said. Freshman twins Cate and Maggie Murdock also said they both had interest in the formation of the club team during their senior year of high school.“When we were still deciding where to [attend college] basketball was important,” Cate Murdock said.Maggie Murdock added that they knew about the lack of a women’s club basketball team, so they emailed club sports and were connected with VanKirk.After the Murdock twins, along with other interested girls, were connected with VanKirk and Kamm, the team started scrimmaging a couple times a week in the fall. However, at the time, the team wasn’t allowed to reserve courts because of its pending status as an official club sport, VanKirk said.Recruitment was largely based on the formation of a group text which included girls who play interhall basketball, VanKirk said. As the team is in its first year, they chose to not enter a league, which is expensive and restricts teams to certain tournaments, and instead play at individual tournaments, Mulshine said. VanKirk said their team is having trouble with adequate funding due to their success, as there is a maximum allocation of funds that first-year clubs receive. The club is still on probationary status, she added.“It was weird because we won this free bid to nationals, but we have to pay for hotel rooms and plane tickets,” Mulshine said. Mulshine and VanKirk said the club made a Notre Dame Day video, and even reached out to Notre Dame Day organizers to be on the livestream. There is also a fundraiser for the club on Saturday at Chipotle. All four members interviewed said their hopes for next season include sustaining their winning streak, getting more funding and making it to nationals for a second time. Cate Murdock said she enjoyed the camaraderie of the team. “It’s been so fun to hangout with all the people on the team. We are all such close friends now,” she said. “We actually hangout outside of basketball,” VanKirk added. Mulshine added the community of the club is something she has really enjoyed. “I’ve been here for a year, but I’ve never really found something that is my ‘thing,’” Mulshine said. “It’s really cool to find a group of girls that you have so much in common with from different grades and dorms. I think we all missed that team aspect that we had in high school.”Tags: basketball, club basketball, Notre Dame Day, Women’s club basketballlast_img read more

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first_imgSaint Mary’s Moreau Center for the Arts will host its annual theatre picnic on Tuesday, Sept. 10 from 5 – 6:30 p.m. on O’Laughlin Green. The department plans to emphasize collaboration, giving back and teaching the community about the importance of theatre at the event at the showcase for its new events, activities and opportunities this school year.Professor Michaela Duffy, technical director of the theatre department, explained the department’s goal for the picnic.“The main goal is to have anybody on campus interested in theater, come to the picnic, share food, introduce themselves, get to know the faculty a little bit and each other,” Duffy said. “This could be anybody who is interested in any aspect of performing arts, not just majors or minors, anyone who is interested in auditioning, working in the scene and costume shops, or even being part of the back-stage crew. It’ll be an old fashioned cookout with lots of desserts, all the fixings for brats, hamburgers and hot dogs, as well as lawn games, and of course, some theatre games.”There will also be a $5 early-bird special for the new Moreau Center t-shirts, Duffy said.The Moreau Center will also hold their second annual series of “Makers’ Meetings” where the scene shop, costume shop, music program and dance program coming together once a month to create opportunities to inspire creativity. Students are also invited to participate in master classes. The first two master classes include an Artistic Fencing Workshop on Sept. 20 and a trip to downtown South Bend for Octoberfest on Oct. 4.Sandie Schooler, who works in the theatre department at Saint Mary’s, shared some of the Moreau Center’s plans for giving back to the environment.“We’re trying to find a need and fill it,” Schooler said. “We’ll be making reusable washable feminine hygiene products for women that don’t have them readily available.”They will also be making clothing protectors for the sisters in the convent later in the year, Schooler said.Schooler said fun is a major goal of the theatre department this year.“We really, really, really try to have fun here,” Schooler said. “The goal this year is to promote the building and encourage more people to join and have fun with us.”The 2019-2020 performing arts season will open with the fall show, “A Party to Murder,” which will run Nov. 7-9 at 7:30 p.m. and concluding with a matinee on Nov. 10 at 2:30 p.m. Later performances include the Madrigal dinner in December, “A Family Affair: An Evening of Opera Scenes” in February, which will return after a few years on the shelf and “Alice in Wonderland” in March. The season will conclude with DanceArts 2020 in April.In addition to the on-stage and community engagement opportunities, there are also many behind-the-scenes jobs available to students as well.Sophomore Caroline Mages, who works in the scene shop, said she learned about different tools, how to build different things and developed skills she didn’t think she would need to learn but will use in the future.“It’s a nice escape between classes, but still a learning experience about all the different aspects of theatre,” Mages said.Tags: picnic, saint mary’s, Theatrelast_img read more

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first_imgSaint Mary’s Dean of Student Academic Services Karen Chambers announced new changes to the grading policies for the spring semester in an email to undergraduates Thursday.Earlier this month, the College adopted a more generous pass/fail grading policy for the Spring 2020 semester, Chambers said, which includes the option to declare Sophia and general elective courses for pass/fail credit until the last day of the semester.The updated policies include the option to withdraw from any course until the last day of the semester — April 30 — without penalty. All withdrawals that occur after mid-semester break will be treated as withdraw/pass. Chambers said this serves as a way to take no credit and no grade in any course. Additionally, students may withdraw from a class without permission from a faculty member up to April 30.There will be a notation on all student transcripts that acknowledges that a global pandemic during the spring 2020 semester led to unusual enrollment patterns and grades, the email said.Chambers clarified that the option for pass/fail grading will not be extended to major and minor courses.“Our goal was to think through the academic consequences of the current disruption to our teaching and learning environment,” Chambers said in the email. “Throughout the conversations, there was consideration and concern for questions around equity, access, engagement, and academic integrity.”According to the email, faculty were concerned students would be unprepared for courses in the future after the implementation of pass/fail. “One of the primary concerns of faculty about adopting pass/fail for courses in the major is that this would result in a lack of assurance of preparedness for subsequent courses. It might also result in an inability to potentially count P/F classes on applications for certain graduate programs, professional programs and licensure,” she said.Chambers said Thursday’s message comes in response to several messages — including a petition signed by many Saint Mary’s students — regarding grading as a result of the transition to remote courses.The email said the College also understands that students have very different learning environments across many different time zones and varied access to technologies.“In response, many faculty are delivering their curriculum asynchronously; this means that you are able to access the course materials at times that are favorable for your learning and individual situation,” Chambers said in the email.Tags: course withdrawl, Karen Chambers, pass-fail, smc academic affairslast_img read more

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first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),Typical lockstep response. 44 confirmed cases?! It’s ridiculous for them to include us with Erie County. Other adjoining counties are already in phase 1. Grow a set. MGN ImageMAYVILLE – Chautauqua County Executive PJ Wendel extended the County’s State of Emergency for up to thirty additional days on Thursday due to the continuing COVID-19 pandemic.Wendel says the extension helps the county qualify for state and federal assistance related to the County’s response to the pandemic.“The Western New York region has not met the Governor’s metrics test for a Phase 1 re-opening,” said Wendel.  “Chautauqua County is still fully subject to the “New York State on PAUSE” executive orders issued by the Governor, and I ask all County citizens and visitors to still “DO THE FIVE” to help stop COVID-19:  (1) HANDS – wash them often; (2) ELBOW – cough into it; (3) FACE – don’t touch it; (4) FEET – stay more than six (6) feet apart; and (5) FEEL SICK? – stay home.”“The County’s COVID-19 Response Team containing the appropriate public health and emergency services officials and staff continues to meet and issue updates to the public daily,” said Chautauqua County Commissioner of Health and Human Services Christine Schuyler.  “We must remain vigilant in all of our efforts to combat the COVID-19 pandemic.  If we fail to do so, all of our hard won progress will be lost.” The county reported no new cases of the virus on Thursday. There remain a total of 44 confirmed cases, with seven active, 33 recovered and four deaths.Earlier in the afternoon, Absolut Care of Westfield reported an employee who worked in the senior living facility tested positive for COVID-19. Although, the company did not release when the positive test was identified.The company said since learning of the positive result everyone at the home was tested, and so far, every test has come back negative.last_img read more

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first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) PxHere File Image.WASHINGTON – Negotiations are underway to find a compromise to save a COVID-19 relief bill on Capitol Hill.The debate on Coronavirus relief comes as Congress must also pass a $1.4 Trillion spending bill to avoid a shutdown. That measure must be approved by Friday at midnight to fund the federal government until the end of September 2021.Federal lawmakers are hopeful they can also find common ground on a $908 billion compromise relief plan.But, to get to an agreement with Republicans, Democrats may be forced to scrap $160-billion in federal aid to cash-strapped cities and states. And, Republicans may have to give up on liability protections for businesses faced with potential lawsuits during the pandemic.The relief package is expected to include extended unemployment programs for 16 weeks.The proposal would increase federal supplemental unemployment insurance benefits by $300 a week during that time.last_img read more

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first_img View Comments This set is a character in itself, constantly rotating throughout the show. How did you even begin to learn to work with it? It was one of the most thrilling days of my career when we got presented the model box and told about the concept of the set. We’d already been three days into rehearsal and Lindsey had made it clear that we weren’t doing a big production, the point of doing this was to make the play heard. And then she showed us the box. I’ve never known anything like it. It was watching a whole company of people with their jaws on the floor. It’s beautiful and magical and surprising and has great showmanship, but it also genuinely supports what we’re trying to do with the play. The box is like the machine of the play, it’s the life machine and I step on that box at the beginning of the show and I don’t get off it until the end. I’m bracing myself every time it spins. [Laughs.] Helen isn’t just a depressed woman, she’s multifaceted—how did you create the layers of this character? As bizarre as it sounds, a lot of the play happens to her. It would have been wrong for me to say, “OK, she’s got depression, so I’m just gonna play somebody with extreme anxiety and depression, and that’s it.” I think Treadwell has written someone who’s delicate and someone who lacks the imagination of a hero at the center of a drama. She’s not necessarily someone who is always going to commit a murder. She’s an ordinary woman who gets affected by this situation that she’s in. So I keep myself as loose and empty as possible and then just let the rest of the company slowly pummel me with a meat tenderizer, as it were. [Laughs.] American audiences know Rebecca Hall from her rich performances on the big screen, from her Golden Globe-nominated performance in Vicky Cristina Barcelona to her action-packed turn in Iron Man 3. But the daughter of legendary director and Royal Shakespeare Company founder Sir Peter Hall has no shortage of stage cred across the pond, including starring roles in her father’s production of Mrs. Warren’s Profession and Sam Mendes’ mountings of The Winter’s Tale and The Cherry Orchard. Now, Hall makes her Broadway debut in Machinal, playing a deeply depressed housewife who finds herself dissatisfied with marriage and motherhood. Below, Hall tells Broadway.com why taking on the challenging new role is like getting pummeled “with a meat tenderizer,” recounts her chaotic opening night and more. Machinal Related Shows The set had some fits and starts on opening night and you had to begin the show all over again—what was that night like for you? When it happened, it was horrible for obvious reasons. While they were trying to fix it, Lindsey was very inspiring. She was like, “Well, we could stop, we could all go home, but I feel like this woman has been waiting since 1928 to have her play done again on Broadway.” We all agreed, it seemed that we had to go back. It’s got such a cumulative force, and certainly for me if I start in the middle of it it’s very odd. I’ve only been half pummeled with the meat tenderizer as it were. [Laughs.] I was nervous going on the second time ‘cause I thought, do I have the energy to get through this? But the thing that struck me when I was onstage was wow, I’m actually doing something for the same audience who had just seen me do it an hour ago. I don’t think, ever in my career, that’s happened before. See Hall in Machinal at the American Airlines Theatre.center_img Show Closed This production ended its run on March 2, 2014 Why did you pick Machinal to make your Broadway debut? It was a combination of things. I wasn’t looking to do a show on Broadway—that wasn’t the starting point. But this play arrived and I would’ve done it anywhere, and that it happened to be being produced on Broadway was a bonus. It’s such an extraordinary piece of writing and so unusual and still so radical and so polarizing now, which I find fascinating. And [director] Lindsey Turner is a really inspiring and shining presence in theater right now, and I’ve been an admirer of her productions in the past, so I was thrilled that she wanted to work with me. Rebecca Hall Star Files I’m excited to see your new movie Tumbledown—did you choose a light romantic comedy to be your next project on purpose? You hit it on the head, that’s exactly what I wanted to do. I read this script when I was in rehearsals. I was so Machinal, Machinal, Machinal, heavy into it. I said to my agent, “I don’t think I can read anything right now.” And then I found myself needing something to read to get my mind out of this dark and depressing place, and I couldn’t put it down. I thought, “Oh, here we go, this is the tonic at the end of Machinal to stop me from going into a deep crash.” [Laughs.] This’ll be it, this’ll be lovely, and it’s a nice head space to go to and it’s really witty and funny and smart. I haven’t done anything like that for while. Wow, that’s heavy! How do you release this tension you build up throughout the performance? A lot of times [in theater], you come off really excited and full of adrenaline, and that’s often the indicator that it’s gone well. But this one is completely the other way around. If I come offstage like that, I know I haven’t been doing my job properly. If I come offstage subdued and I want to go and sit quietly by myself and stare at a wall, then I know that it’s gone well. [Laughs.] So I usually sit quietly for a little bit and then go get a drink.last_img read more

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