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first_imgLetterkenny athlete Ivan Toner showed why he is in superb form with an amazing run of 15.46 to win this evening’s Termon GAA’s 5K.Ivan Toner, winner of the Termon 5K.More than 350 walkers and runners took part in the event to raise much needed funds for the local GAA club.Earlier this week Toner won the Manor 5K and he has consistently turned in top three performances in recent months. The following is a list of the runners and their times. Well done to all who took part.Place Number Name Time Category Club1 49 Ivan Toner 00:15:46 SM Letterkenny A C2 114 Pauric Breslin 00:16:24 SM Letterkenny A C 3 73 Barry Meehan 00:16:47 SM Letterkenny A C4 43 Natasha Adams 00:16:50 SW Lifford A C5 81 Kevin Ferry 00:16:51 M40 Letterkenny A C6 104 Gareth Kerrigan 00:17:03 SM Milford AC7 82 Raymond Birch 00:17:08 SM Letterkenny A C 8 52 Noel Diver 00:17:25 SM Rosses A.C.9 83 Liam Murray 00:17:32 SM Individual10 84 Brian Ferry 00:17:33 SM Letterkenny A C11 57 Ciaran O’Donnell 00:17:38 M40 Letterkenny A C 12 1 Peter Murray 00:17:39 JM St Peters AC Lurgan13 69 Aidan McKenna 00:17:44 M40 Letterkenny A C14 181 Hugh Gallagher 00:17:46 Sm 24/7 Triathlon15 44 Darren Price 00:17:46 SM Letterkenny A C16 74 Mark Hunter 00:17:51 SM 24/7 Triathlon17 88 Pádraig Friel 00:18:05 SM Letterkenny A C18 38 Nial Barry 00:18:06 SM Letterkenny A C19 112 Gearoid McGeehan 00:18:14 SM Individual20 172 Dermot McElchar 00:18:15 SM Individual21 243 Barry Coyle 00:18:24 SM Individual22 67 Gerard Devine 00:18:25 SM Individual23 56 Ben George 00:18:28 SM Letterkenny A C24 53 Paddy Fox 00:18:29 SM Cranford A C25 241 Fionntán O’Flynn 00:18:38 SM Individual26 77 PJ Friel 00:18:42 JM Individual27 90 Paul Cosgrove 00:18:42 M40 Letterkenny A C28 76 PJ Hagan 00:18:43 SM Milford AC29 45 Michael Deveney 00:18:43 M40 United Health Group30 163 Michael Gallagher 00:18:46 M40 Finn Valley A C31 91 Paul Gallagher 00:18:49 SM Individual32 51 Paul Russell 00:18:51 SM Individual33 242 Mark O’Donnell 00:18:57 SM Termon34 126 Eoin Kelly 00:19:02 JM Cranford A C35 124 Shaun Boyce 00:19:04 M40 Individual36 208 Paul McGettigan 00:19:07 SM Milford AC37 39 Anthony McDaid 00:19:10 SM Individual38 2 Eoghan Murray 00:19:19 JM St Peters AC Lurgan39 133 Sean Crossan 00:19:21 M40 Finn Valley A C40 63 Catherine Dooher 00:19:22 SW Finn Valley A C41 65 Martin Anderson 00:19:25 M40 Finn Valley A C42 193 Cathal Morrison 00:19:26 M40 Individual43 166 Olly Duffy 00:19:35 SM Letterkenny A C44 109 Cathal Harvey 00:19:38 SM Individual45 50 Christopher Murray 00:19:39 SM Cranford A C46 220 Kevin McElwaine 00:19:40 SM Termon47 101 Colly O’Donnell 00:19:46 M40 Letterkenny A C48 174 Liam McHugh 00:19:47 M50 Finn Valley A C49 92 Manus Peoples 00:19:49 M50 Individual50 239 Helena Quinn 00:19:52 SW Individual51 40 Mark McFadden 00:19:52 M40 Individual52 68 Andy Scanlon 00:19:57 M40 Finn Valley A C53 34 Barry Gallagher 00:20:04 JM Individual54 209 Jim Toye 00:20:11 M40 Individual55 113 Paul Lee 00:20:12 SM Letterkenny A C56 46 Dermot Gallagher 00:20:14 M40 Individual57 62 Sean O’Leary 00:20:15 M50 Finn Valley A C58 7 Ben Harkin 00:20:17 JM Milford AC59 41 Chris Nee 00:20:19 M40 Individual60 80 Anthony Murray 00:20:20 M60 Individual61 48 Jane McGinley 00:20:21 SW Letterkenny A C62 92 Manus Peoples 00:20:25 M50 Individual63 93 Ciaran Doherty 00:20:30 SM United Health Group64 111 Shauna McGeehan 00:20:30 SW Letterkenny A C65 195 Davin Doherty 00:20:30 SM United Health Group66 61 PJ Friel 00:20:39 M50 Individual67 167 Naoise Enright 00:20:40 SM Letterkenny A C68 86 Martin Kerr 00:20:48 M60 Individual69 150 Cathal Gorman 00:20:49 M40 Individual70 149 Gerard McConnell 00:20:50 SM Individual71 #N/A 00:20:53 #N/A #N/A72 129 Serena McDaid 00:20:54 SW Letterkenny A C73 160 Shane Doherty 00:20:55 JM Individual74 205 Sabrina Mackey 00:21:00 W40 24/7 Triathlon75 108 Deirdre Diver 00:21:03 SW Letterkenny A C76 156 Caolán Gallagher 00:21:04 JM Individual77 155 Ryan McFadden 00:21:05 JM Individual78 240 Caolan Mellet 00:21:06 SM Termon79 64 Mary Hippsley 00:21:07 W40 Finn Valley A C80 59 Michael McNulty 00:21:09 M40 Individual81 200 Collette McElwaine 00:21:10 SW Milford AC82 224 Pat Brady 00:21:13 M50 Individual83 139 Amanda McFadden 00:21:15 SW Individual84 89 Richard Raymond 00:21:17 M50 Letterkenny A C85 72 Laura Lee Penrose 00:21:24 JW Finn Valley A C86 184 Brendan Sheridan 00:21:29 M40 Individual87 71 Bronagh O’Gara 00:21:30 SW 24/7 Triathlon88 119 Owen Coyle 00:21:31 M50 Rosses A.C.89 103 Brian Alcorn 00:21:32 JM Individual90 202 Niamh McEnhill 00:21:33 SW Individual91 165 Brian McBride 00:21:35 M60 Letterkenny A C92 168 Ciaran Liddy 00:21:36 SM Letterkenny A C93 162 Rory Reynolds 00:21:47 SM Individual94 147 Karol McGinley 00:21:49 JM Individual95 79 Noreen Bonner 00:22:01 W50 Finn Valley A C96 3 John Hughes 00:22:04 M50 Individual97 10 Donal McCaul 00:22:07 M40 Individual98 227 Grainne McDaid 00:22:08 SW Individual99 191 Lucy O’Flynn 00:22:09 SW Individual100 221 Jack Alcorn 00:22:13 JM Individual101 85 James McLaughlin 00:22:17 M50 Individual102 117 Chris Shields 00:22:19 JM Individual103 214 Aidan Kelly 00:22:21 SM Individual104 100 Eilís McClafferty 00:22:22 SW Individual105 151 Eugene McGinley 00:22:23 M40 Individual106 106 Paul Sweeney 00:22:25 M40 Individual107 99 Adrian McClafferty 00:22:55 SM Individual108 157 Shaun O’Donnell 00:22:26 M50 Lifford A C109 27 Gavin Gorman 00:22:29 SM Individual110 201 Martin McGettrick 00:22:30 SM Individual111 60 Caroline McNulty 00:22:37 SW Finn Valley A C112 8 Oisin Harkin 00:22:38 JM Milford AC113 4 Eimhear Bradley 00:22:45 SW Individual114 116 Mark Scott 00:22:46 SM Individual115 196 Rory McGrenra 00:22:50 JM Individual116 203 Mark Bonar 00:22:51 SM Individual117 236 Derek Brennan 00:23:05 SM Individual118 287 Cian McMenamin 00:23:16 family Individual119 54 Roisin Lynch 00:23:22 W60 N.W. Triathlon120 17 Meábh McDaid 00:23:25 JW Individual121 285 Rionach Giles 00:23:28 family Individual122 178 Amanda McNulty 00:23:30 SW 24/7 Triathlon123 171 Aine McElchar 00:23:31 SW Finn Valley A C124 66 Alison Stoddart 00:23:32 SW Individual125 141 Tara Callaghan 00:23:33 SW Individual126 78 Gloria Donaghey 00:23:34 W50 Finn Valley A C127 246 Liam McGinty 00:23:25 M40 Finn Valley A C128 96 Kieron Boyle 00:23:36 M40 Individual129 143 Paddy Toye 00:23:37 M40 Individual130 158 Noel McBride 00:23:49 M50 Individual131 95 Imelda Gallagher 00:23:50 W40 Individual132 94 Sean McDevitt 00:23:54 M40 Individual133 169 Denise McGahern 00:23:55 SW Finn Valley A C134 192 Mark Gildea 00:23:56 SM Individual135 21 Eoin Sheehy 00:23:57 SM Individual136 232 Tara Carron 00:23:59 SW Individual137 187 Noelle Duffy 00:24:00 SW 24/7 Triathlon138 20 John McBrearty 00:24:07 SM Individual139 175 Marie McColgan 00:24:08 W40 Finn Valley A C140 75 Gary Price 00:24:10 SM Individual141 194 Clare Molloy 00:24:10 SW Individual142 105 Margaret Shields 00:24:11 W40 Letterkenny A C143 125 Joe McDaid 00:24:14 M40 Individual144 219 Noelle Parker 00:24:31 SW 24/7 Triathlon145 199 Jane Murphy 00:24:38 W40 Individual146 286 Oran McMenamin 00:24:39 family Individual147 210 Gretta Toye 00:24:42 W40 Individual148 179 Eamonn O’Regan 00:24:45 M50 United Health Group149 55 Georgie Chan 00:24:48 M40 Individual150 136 Eileen Morning 00:24:49 W40 Individual151 146 Henry Gallagher 00:24:50 SM Individual152 134 Ann Marie Patton 00:24:51 SW Individual153 47 Lee Ponsonby 00:24:52 SM Individual154 131 Damian Patton 00:24:53 SM Individual155 25 Anne Sweeney 00:25:03 SW Individual156 135 Mary Martin 00:25:04 W60 Finn Valley A C157 132 Bernie Crossan 00:25:05 W40 Finn Valley A C158 197 Marcella McGrenra 00:25:06 SW Individual159 198 Martina McGrenra 00:25:10 SW Individual160 28 Brian McDaid 00:25:19 M40 Individual161 176 Diane Gallagher 00:25:30 SW Finn Valley A C162 249 Niall Dugera 00:25:32 SM Individual163 70 Mark Meehan 00:25:33 SM Letterkenny A C164 161 John Burke 00:25:34 M40 Individual165 18 Amanda Quinn 00:25:37 SW Individual166 102 Elieen Toye 00:25:39 SW Individual167 97 Tiernán Boyle 00:25:43 JM Individual168 31 Bridie Duffy 00:25:44 W40 Individual169 204 Angela Doran 00:25:51 W40 Individual170 159 Anne Doherty 00:25:33 W50 Individual171 140 Serena McCormick 00:25:53 SW Individual172 5 Gerry Burke 00:25:57 M50 Individual173 164 Maureen Doherty 00:26:02 W40 Individual174 222 Noeleen Doogan 00:26:08 W40 Individual175 128 Cathy Harvey 00:26:09 W40 Individual176 130 Mary Bonnar 00:26:10 W50 Individual177 37 Paul Gallagher 00:26:11 M40 Individual178 211 Breda Canning 00:26:12 SW Individual179 213 Louise Roddy 00:26:23 SW 24/7 Triathlon180 138 Annette Coyle 00:26:36 W50 Finn Valley A C181 110 Miriam O’Donnell 00:26:48 W40 Finn Valley A C182 142 Denis Sheridan 00:26:49 M50 Milford AC183 269 Fintan Sheehy 00:26:56 family Individual184 270 Cormac Sheehy 00:26:56 family Individual185 121 Sinéad Boyce 00:27:00 SW Finn Valley A C186 152 Shona Maloney 00:27:08 W40 24/7 Triathlon187 127 Stephanie Dunleary 00:27:11 W40 Individual188 107 Sean Douglas 00:27:14 SM Individual189 170 Siobhan Houstan 00:27:17 SW Finn Valley A C190 177 Denise McBride 00:27:18 SW 24/7 Triathlon191 118 Bróna Tinney 00:27:33 JW Termon192 87 Conor Casey 00:27:47 JM Individual193 11 Sadie Toye 00:27:48 W40 Individual194 233 Eoghan McElwaine 00:27:51 JM Individual195 35 Mary Gallagher 00:27:52 W40 Individual196 212 Catherine Doherty 00:28:05 W40 Individual197 153 Andrea Doherty 00:28:05 SW Individual198 115 Anne Doherty 00:28:15 W60 Milford AC199 22 Claire Nelis 00:28:38 SW Individual200 6 Rosaleen Gallagher 00:28:40 W40 Individual201 228 Katriona McDaid 00:28:41 SW Individual202 234 Megan Baxter 00:28:42 SW Individual203 342 Mattie Trearty 00:28:56 family Individual204 120 Pauline Dowds 00:29:00 SW Finn Valley A C205 24 Edel Druce 00:29:48 W40 Individual206 30 Tara Moore 00:29:49 SW Creeslough207 185 Annette Olson 00:30:04 SW Individual208 186 Donna McGettigan 00:30:05 SW Individual209 145 Anne Marie Gallagher 00:30:30 SW Individual210 317 Megan McGettigan 00:30:44 family Individual211 183 Eva McCloskey 00:30:52 SW Individual212 182 Sharon Kelly 00:30:53 SW Individual213 148 Anne Marie Gallagher 00:30:55 SW Individual214 144 Christina Nelis 00:30:56 SW Individual215 303 Lorcan Doherty 00:31:00 family Individual216 58 Sinéad Devine 00:31:07 SW Individual217 26 Fiona McConnell 00:31:20 W40 Individual218 180 Kathleen McCourt 00:31:50 W40 Individual219 123 Paddy Gallagher 00:31:50 SM Creeslough220 33 Steven Sheridan 00:32:19 M40 Individual221 231 Karen McHugh 00:32:23 W40 Individual222 235 David Baxter 00:32:24 SM Individual223 12 Marian McCaul 00:32:32 W40 Individual224 190 Emily O’Flynn 00:32:36 JW Individual225 #N/A 00:32:37 #N/A #N/A226 254 Eileen Pinder 00:32:39 family Individual227 338 Lorcan Callaghan 00:32:43 family Individual228 335 Niamh Bonnar 00:32:45 family Individual229 291 Martina Kelly 00:32:48 family Individual230 9 Noreen Sheridan 00:32:53 SW Individual231 173 Eleanor McHugh 00:32:56 W40 Individual232 229 Anne Quinn 00:33:06 SW Individual233 299 Gareth Gallagher 00:33:07 family Individual234 42 Pauline Callan 00:33:08 SW Individual235 223 Anne Kelly 00:33:17 W40 Individual236 225 Aine McLaughlin 00:33:18 JW Individual237 98 Barry Ryan 00:33:30 JM Individual238 237 Kai McCafferty 00:33:33 JM Individual239 310 Amy McGettigam 00:33:35 family Individual240 137 Louise Doherty 00:35:15 SW Individual241 217 Maureen O’Donnell 00:35:30 SW Individual242 32 Helen Montgomery 00:35:30 SW Creeslough243 218 Terri McFadden 00:35:33 W40 Individual244 154 Frances McBride 00:36:05 W40 Individual245 245 Brodie O’Toole 00:36:06 JW Individual246 290 Eileen Kelly 00:37:08 family Individual247 244 Maoliosa O’Toole 00:37:26 JW Individual248 326 Caoimhe Thompson 00:38:21 family Individual249 318 Maria Sweeney 00:38:21 family Individual250 292 Conal McGettigan 00:38:31 family Individual251 316 Oran McGettigan 00:38:31 family Individual252 206 Maria O’Donnell 00:38:33 Sw Individual253 207 Rose Canning 00:38:33 W50 Individual254 311 Edel McGettigan 00:38:36 family Individual255 330 Orla Corry 00:38:40 family Individual256 336 Liam Bonnar 00:38:40 family Individual257 334 Cathy Bonnar 00:39:15 family Individual258 339 Chloe Callaghan 00:39:15 family Individual259 341 Michael Trearty 00:39:34 family Individual260 272 Conor McFadden 00:39:49 family Individual261 332 Adam Corry 00:39:50 family Individual262 247 Steven McDaid 00:39:51 JM Individual263 252 Noreen Pinder 00:39:52 family Individual264 251 Frank Pinder 00:39:57 family Individual265 253 Mairead Pinder 00:39:58 family Individual266 255 Frankie Pinder 00:39:59 family Individual267 238 Majella O’Connor 00:40:00 W40 IndividualTONER TURNS IN SUPERB RUN TO WIN TERMON 5K – WHERE DID YOU COME? was last modified: July 3rd, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:donegalTermon 5Klast_img read more

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first_imgDonegal’s food businesses will be hoping they can find the right combination of ingredients for success when judges from Ireland’s Foodie Destinations visit the county this weekend.Donegal Food Coast initiative has been short-listed as a finalist for the Foodie Destinations 2019 awards and those involved in the county-wide initiative will be hoping they can see off tough competition to take the prestigious title.As well as this week’s judging, members of the public can also play their part by voting online and Head of Enterprise in Donegal, Michael Tunney has urged the people of the county to get behind the project in the public vote. “The Food Coast – Donegal’s Good Food Initiative – was developed by Local Enterprise Office Donegal as a programme to support development, growth and quality in Donegal’s food sector. It is fantastic to see the initiative in the short-listed finalists and to see Donegal Town also in the running.In a short space of time, The Food Coast has become a central platform for establishing Donegal as a “Food County” – a place with a vibrant food culture and food economy and that’s something we are determined to expand upon,” he said.Public voting for the awards opened online on Wednesday 24th July and an appeal has gone out to the people of Donegal to log on to voting page http://www.foodiedestinations.ie and vote for The Food Coast Donegal before the closing deadline of Tuesday 20th of August. Earlier this year the county launched its 2019 list of the Food Coast Donegal’s Experiences and since then the county has been host to a hub of mouth-watering events to delight locals and visitors alike.“Food plays an intrinsic role in the visitor experience and the series of food events we have in Donegal this year, offer a wide range of extraordinary experiences celebrating Donegal food and its champions,” Mr. Tunney said.Add to that the county’s growing array of nationally and internationally recognised chefs, as well as national and international successes and the Head of Enterprise suggests the fruits of the work being done by Food Coast Donegal is really starting to pay off.“The vision of the Donegal Food Strategy has always been to collectively work together to make Donegal famous for food. To make the county recognised as a pioneering region for its approach to fostering and growing new start-up and existing food businesses.We have plans in place for more initiatives to keep this momentum going, but in the meantime, it is, without doubt, a great honour to have been short-listed as a finalist,” he added.The Head of Enterprise says everyone involved with the Food Coast is really looking forward to welcoming the judges and showcasing the best Donegal has to offer. “I am certain the judges will be impressed by our wonderful Donegal food but we will still need the support of the public and I would appeal to the people of Donegal to get behind the Food Coast Donegal in the online vote,” he concluded.Local Enterprise Office Donegal is supported through co-funding from the Irish Government and the European Regional Development Fund 2014 – 2020. To contact the Local Enterprise Office in Donegal, log on to http://www.localenterprise.ie/donegal or phone 0749160735.Public support could be vital ingredient for Donegal Food Coast was last modified: August 6th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:donegal food coastlast_img read more

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first_img Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebook Embed from Getty ImagesTottenham have sealed the capture of Juan Foyth from Estudiantes and are set to formally complete the signing of Serge Aurier from Paris St-Germain.Argentine centre-back Foyth, 19, has moved for an undisclosed fee and has signed a five-year contract.And Ivory Coast right-back, Aurier, 24, has been granted a work permit, paving the way for his move to be rubber-stamped.Aurier has already completed a medical and agreed personal terms with Spurs, who had an offer of around £23m accepted by PSG last week.Both players could make their Premier League debuts against Everton on 9 September and their first appearances for Spurs at Wembley in the Champions League clash with Borussia Dortmund four days later.See also:Tottenham complete signing of defender AurierTottenham complete signing of Swansea’s Llorentelast_img read more

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first_imgClick here if you’re unable to view the video or photo gallery on your mobile device.Sunday’s 49ers-Ravens game was billed all week as a Super Bowl preview.We should be so lucky to see these two teams play again in South Florida in February. Because this regular-season contest did something extremely rare in this day and age: it actually lived up to the hype.Sunday’s contest in the rain and mud of Maryland was a true heavyweight bout, a line-of-scrimmage battle predicated on …last_img read more

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first_imgWindow dressing on the rock wall of a medieval church stirs unbelief, anger among anti-creationists.At the outset, we are not going to claim with absolute certainty that these carvings are dinosaurs. But look at the photo included in an article for CMI by David Lewis. If you didn’t know where it came from, or when it was made, what would you think?Gemma Tarlach sure thought they were dinosaurs. In her June 1 blog entry for Discover Magazine (written independently of the CMI article and apparently without knowledge of it), she startled her mostly-secular readers with a shocking headline: “FOUND: Medieval Dinosaurs!” (exclamation point hers).But she knows that they can’t be dinosaurs. The builders of this remote 15th-century chapel in the Caucasus mountains of Georgia could not have known about dinosaurs, which were only identified by English scientist Richard Owen four centuries later. Everybody knows that dinosaurs had gone extinct 65 million years ago—according to the materialist consensus.Like Lewis, Tarlach hiked to the remote site herself and took her own pictures.After hiking up to the famous Church of Tsminda Sameba, sitting pretty at an altitude of nearly 2200m in the Great Caucasus, I couldn’t help but notice something a little odd about one of the carvings on the 15th century belfry.The two critters scampering across the stonework bear an uncanny resemblance, in my opinion, to prosauropods, semi-quadrupedal herbivores that preceded the fully quadrupedal, longer-necked behemoths of the sauropod tribe. Or maybe they’re a rendering of Pulanesaura, one of the first sauropods.The artist may have intended to represent one of the salamander species endemic to the region (I don’t know; no one seems to have the answer), but I prefer to believe they’re dinosaurs. What do you think?She didn’t have long to wait. The comments came in hard and fast, “explaining away” the evidence with various speculations, often vitriolic against creationists who might be tempted to use the figures to support their views. It’s stylized otters. It’s salamanders. It’s dragons. Anything but dinosaurs. When the responses got out of hand, she called for a time out. “It’s a curious carving that, as I said, probably depicts some endemic salamander but looks like dinosaurs. That’s all. Just a quirky, funny thing I saw on vacation. Oh wait…I’m on vacation. That’s right. Peace out.”This is more a story about sociology than science. The responses reveal something about human nature: observations that don’t conform to a worldview must be discarded! That’s Maier’s Law in action: “If the facts do not conform to the theory, they must be disposed of.”The carving is a “brute fact,” but brute facts don’t exist in a vacuum. Many questions must be asked and answered. Who carved it? When was it carved? Was it a later addition after the 19th century? Was it modeled after a mythical creature from local folklore, or from something the artist actually witnessed? Is there any way that fossils could have caused medieval artists to reconstruct what they thought the creatures looked like? Those are fair questions, but Tarlach and some others clearly saw dinosaurs as a first impression. It posed a Groucho Marx dilemma: who would they believe, the materialist consensus or their lyin’ eyes?This is not the only anomalous evidence of recent dinosaurs. Creation ministries have long pointed out indications that ancient people witnessed the extinct beasts from their writings and depictions (e.g., dragon legends, the book of Job, various carvings). Some of the artifacts and manuscripts are more credible than others. Given the multiplicity of indications, from so many different continents (e.g., China, North America, Europe), the overall impression seems strong enough to persuade an unbiased observer that at least some of them are clearly dinosaurs. And then there’s all that soft-tissue evidence (e.g., 6/09/15).Exercise: Read the comments after Tarlach’s article and evaluate the effectiveness of creationist responses. Would they influence a materialist positively or negatively? How could they be improved? (Visited 124 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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first_img29 May 2003Wines of South Africa (WOSA) presented diplomas earlier this month to the first group of students to complete a new custom-made wine course for black hospitality industry operators in Cape Town. The two-month course was created by the Cape Wine Academy (CWA), and the 15 students were sponsored by WOSA.According to Su Birch, CEO of WOSA, the course will help bridge the divide between the traditional wine community and emerging tourism operators.It is intended as a vehicle to promote Cape wine tourism while providing operators with the necessary skills to offer tourists an informative and entertaining experience.To meet the differing needs of both restaurant owners and tour guides, the group was divided in two. After the preliminary classes those in the restaurant trade focused on wine service, storage and wine and food combinations, while the course for tour guides concentrated on the different wine regions and varietals.Both groups did several tastings and tours to gain practical experience, and at the end of the course of about two months sat for a formal CWA examination.Birch sees the course as a big step towards creating new wine ambassadors for South Africa and contributing to the Cape wine experience of international tourists.“We also like the idea of working with established operators who have a vested interest in learning about wine to enhance their service levels and the profitability of their businesses”, Birch added.WOSA will present the course on a regular basis, with the second starting later this year.Western Cape Tourism CEO Mike Fabricius commented: “The days of two separate tourism industries – township and mainstream – are over. We are entering a new phase, where visitors will be offered a seamless tourism experience, and the wine industry has a vital role to play in building bridges in this regard.”Senzeni Ndebele, marketing manager at WOSA and course co-ordinator, said that various new business ideas came out the course.“Paula Gumede of One City Tours is going to use expand her beer garden in Mandalay into a fully-fledged wine shop, and Jeannie Fletcher has formed Yamme Investments (‘yamme’ is Sotho for ‘my mother’s’), a women’s investment group that will start marketing wine under their own label towards the end of the year.”Source: Wines of South Africalast_img read more

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first_img10 July 2006Public-private partnerships are playing a major role in turning South Africa’s crime situation around, according to a special survey of the country in the 8 April 2006 issue of The Economist.Singled out for special mention by The Economist is Business Against Crime South Africa, the organisation that pioneered a successful model, combining private sector know-how with a mixture of private and public money, of combating crime in the country. Formed in 1996 at the behest of former president Nelson Mandela, Business Against Crime (BAC) supports the government’s crime-fighting initiatives by harnessing the skills and resources of the country’s business community.The organisation, a not-for-profit body funded primarily by the business sector, is still best known for its role in dramatically cutting street crime in Johannesburg’s central business district – by setting up closed-circuit TV surveillance cameras following the success of a similar scheme in Cape Town.Oiling the wheels of justiceMission accomplished, Business Against Crime left others to run this project, and applied its model to other parts of South Africa’s criminal justice system, such as the slow processing of criminal cases.According to The Economist, the BAC “spent R31-million over several years on getting outside experts to analyse the flow of cases, from the initial reporting of an incident in a police station to the arrival (or not) of the case in court.“On the basis of this research, the government spent about R2-billion on reforming the whole system. Perhaps partly as a result, conviction rates – a dismal 8% in 2000 – are beginning to creep up.”Management training for policeAnother major BAC project involves management training in South Africa’s police stations. In pilot projects in the provinces of Mpumalanga and Gauteng, over 200 policemen and women from 28 police stations received training in 2005.And according to the BAC, the country’s business sector has donated an effective R88-million for developing a leadership development programme for senior station managers and implementing the programme between 2006 and 2008.Commercial courtsBusiness Against Crime, together with the South African Banks Risk Information Centre, has also tackled commercial crime, establishing four specialised commercial courts in Durban, Johannesburg, Port Elizabeth and Pretoria – with two more to come, in Bloemfontein and Cape Town, in 2006.Staffed by specialists to convict the guilty quickly and efficiently and secure appropriate sentences, the commercial courts boast an average 97% to 98% conviction rate, and have cut the case processing time for commercial crimes in the country by half, from 30 months in 1999 to 14 months in 2005.Tackling trade in stolen goodsWhen it came to tackling organised crime involving large syndicates, the BAC shifted its approach, taking steps to help remove the commercial benefit in the trade of stolen goods – in the first place, vehicles, cellphones and copper cable.Improved business processes within the government’s vehicle management system have helped to root out fraud and corruption and, according to the BAC, contributed to a 30% reduction in hijackings in Gauteng province in 2005/06.Business Against Crime is also helping to facilitate:the introduction of improved vehicle identity measures such as microdotting;a better co-ordinated approach to “chop shop” disruption operations, supported by new legislation in the form of the Second-Hand Goods Act; andgreater control over the movement of “vehicles in transit” to help curb the illegal registration of second-hand vehicles locally.In February 2006, SA’s Retail Motor Industry Organisation became the 14th business organistion to join the Industry Alignment Forum, a body set up by the BAC to co-ordinate business efforts to combat crime.In April 2005, Business Against Crime also brokered a cellphone blacklisting agreement between the police and the country’s three cellular operators – Cell C, MTN and Vodacom.According to the BAC, the reporting of stolen, lost and damaged cellphones “increased by approximately 500% during the first 10 months of 2005, compared to the same period in both 2003 and 2004.”Reaching out to schoolsBusiness Against Crime has also reached out to South Africa’s schools, with a special programme that teaches positive morality and non-violent methods of conflict resolution.The Tiisa Thuto project was run in 121 schools in Gauteng province in 2004/05, reaching over 1.2-million scholars, teachers and parents, and is now being rolled out in the Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, Mpumalanga and Western Cape provinces.SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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first_img Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details. Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in All through the 1980s and 1990s, a small band of North American believers worked to maintain and expand our understanding of residential energy efficiency. These were the pioneers of the home performance field: blower-door experts, weatherization contractors, and “house as a system” trainers. At conferences like Affordable Comfort, they gathered to share their knowledge and lick their wounds.These pioneers understood what was wrong with American houses: They leaked air; they were inadequately insulated; they had bad windows; and their duct systems were a disaster.Occasionally, these energy nerds would scoff at millionaire clients who were more interested in “green bling” — a phrase that usually described photovoltaic panels — than they were in reducing air leaks in their home’s thermal envelope.What I’ve just described is (in anthropological terms) a set of beliefs associated with a distinct subculture. Our tribe had a shared belief: that improving a home’s thermal envelope is preferable to installing renewable energy equipment.Occasionally, a few facts would appear to undermine our belief system. For example, if a disinterested observer noted that a proposed envelope measure had a very long payback period, most members of our tribe would answer that the measure was a wise investment, because energy prices are likely to skyrocket in the future.During the waning years of the last millennium, these North American beliefs crossed the Atlantic and were adopted by a group of academics in Darmstadt, Germany.The beliefs became petrified in a set of rules called the Passivhaus standard.Several factors have changed since these beliefs were first formulated. For one thing, fossil fuel prices have stayed low; for another, photovoltaic equipment has gotten dirt cheap.The (sometimes painful) fact is that it is now hard to justify many energy-retrofit measures that energy experts still eagerly recommend. Moreover,… center_img This article is only available to GBA Prime Memberslast_img read more

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first_imgMembers of Colorado’s Intermountain Rural Electric Association who have installed photovoltaic (PV) systems won’t find much to like in a plan under consideration by the association’s board of directors. A report from UtilityDive.com says that the proposal would reduce the reimbursement that owners of PV systems get for the electricity they sell from the retail rate of 12.3 cents per kilowatt hour to 6.5 cents per kWh, which is just above the co-op’s avoided cost of about 5 cents per kWh.At the same time, the plan would see the introduction of an unusual demand charge for residential solar customers. On top of the standard $10 monthly service charge that all residential customers pay, customers with PV systems would pay another $7 per kW in the 15-minute period of highest electric use during the month. Demand charges are common for commercial and industrial customers, but not in residential rate plans.The proposal, however, would reduce off-peak nighttime rates for customers with solar panels to 6.5 cents per kWh. Number of solar customers is growingThe number of residential customers with PV systems is very small, but it’s increasing rapidly. There are some 600 solar customers today, and that is expected to grow to about 1,000 by the end of the year. At the end of 2014, there were 270.The co-op’s concern, the web site reported, is that if more of its 145,000 customers begin producing more of their own power, the fixed costs of running and maintaining the grid will be shifted to customers who don’t have solar panels. This is the same argument that has pitted utilities against solar advocates around the country.Advocates, however, say the co-op is undervaluing the benefits of solar power.The board of directors had been scheduled to vote on the plan on June 1, but after a three-hour meeting attended by dozens of solar customers, the board instead tabled the plan to give members more time to study the issue, according to an article in the Denver Business Journal.Rebecca Cantwell, executive director of the Colorado Solar Energy Industries Association, said that the customers who showed up were adamantly opposed to the plan.“The people who talked were absolutely passionate about how unfair this is and how they’re trying to make the world a better place and IREA is going against them,” she said.last_img read more

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