Tag: 杭州楼凤

first_imgBilly Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TAGSKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick Post Facebook Previous articleTipperary Education and Training Board launches Microsoft traineeshipNext articleLimerick delivers robust economic response to COVID-19 Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Email WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads LimerickNewsThe Late Tom O’Donnell – RIPBy Staff Reporter – October 9, 2020 3320 Printcenter_img WhatsApp THE death has taken place of former Fine Gael TD, Minister and MEP Tom O’Donnell (94). Mr O’Donnell is survived by his wife Helen, son Thomas, brothers Frank, PJ and sisters Bernadette Boner and Millie Boyle, nephews and nieces. He was predeceased by his sister Alicia and brothers Mark and Martin.The eldest of eight children of Patrick and Josephine O’Donnell and a native of Bulgaden, Kilmallock and later Cappamore and Dromin, Mr O’Donnell died suddenly and peacefully today at his residence at Ballysheedy West, Co. Limerick.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Born into a high-profile political family, his paternal grandfather was Chairman of the Kilmallock Board of Guardians for several year, was prominently involved in the Land League movement and was imprisoned for six months for his Land League Activities.His mother came from a strong republican family; her brother Dick was Commandant of the Mid-Limerick Flying Column in the war of Independence and was a Cumann na nGaedhael TD for Limerick from 1924-1932.A man of deep faith and a great love of family, Mr O’Donnell was educated at the Convent of Mercy and Boys National School in Cappamore and later at Crescent College Limerick, CBS Charleville and Copsewood College, Pallaskenry. His third level education took him to St. Patrick’s College Thurles and UCD, where he obtained a B.A. Degree.He taught at St. Fintan’s, Sutton and North Strand Vocational School before returning to Limerick to pursue a political career. He was elected to Dáil Éireann in 1961 and remained a full-time public representative until his retirement in 1989, having been elected in eight General Elections and two European Elections.He was promoted to the Fine Gael front bench as Transport, Power and Tourism Spokesman following the 1969 General Election, when he became the first Fine Gael candidate to head the poll since the establishment of the Limerick East constituency. He was appointed Minister for the Gaeltacht following the 1973 General Election by then Taoiseach Liam Cosgrave T.D.He was elected a Member of the European Parliament for Munster in 1979 and retained his seat in the 1984 election with a substantially increased vote. His surplus helped to elect Tom Raftery and win a second seat for the party for the first and only time in the Munster constituency.He served as spokesman on Regional Policy and Regional Planning in the Parliament by the Christian Democrat Group and served in that capacity during his ten years as M.E.P.Prior to that, under the dual mandate system, he had been recalled to the front bench in Dáil Éireann by Garret Fitzgerald in 1980 and was selected as a candidate for the 1981 General Election, heading the poll with a sufficient surplus to help elect Michael Noonan, thereby giving Fine Gael two seats for the first time ever in a General Election in the East Limerick Constituency.   He was re-elected in the two snap elections of 1982.He retired ahead of the 1989 European General Election, bringing an end to a sterling political career across three decades.He continued in ‘public service’ in a voluntary capacity, acting as Chairman and subsequently President of the Irish Peace Institute at the University of Limerick; Chairman of P.A.U.L., the Limerick City Area Partnership; Chairman of Limerick City and County Strategy Group; Chairman of the Limerick Employment Pact and was a member of the Board of the Limerick Enterprise Network and the Limerick Community Based Education Initiative.He also served on the Board of Management of the Limerick School for the Hearing Impaired and was a founding member of the L.E.D.P. (Limerick Enterprise Development Park).In 2001 he was honoured by Limerick County Council and in 2005 by Limerick City Council with civic receptions and special presentations to mark the completion of half a century of political and voluntary service to the people of Limerick City and County. He was awarded the Schuman Medal by the European People’s Party (Christian Democrat Group).The family tradition in politics is carried on by his nephew Deputy Kieran O’Donnell, son of the late Dr. Martin O’Donnell, who died on Monday.He was married to Helen O’Connor in 1984, a moment he described as the most important and happiest event in his life. Twitter Linkedin Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Advertisement Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Roisin Upton excited by “hockey talent coming through” in Limericklast_img read more

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first_imgThe Music Department’s Louis C. Elson Lecture will be delivered this spring by cellist  Yo-Yo Ma. “A Conversation with Yo-Yo Ma: Culture, Connection, and Citizenship in a Time of Change,” features Ma and members of the Silk Road Ensemble in a lecture/presentation beginning at 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, March 22 in John Knowles Paine Concert Hall on the Harvard University campus. The lecture is free and open to the public; no tickets are required. Seating will be available on a first-come, first-seated basis.Ma draws inspiration from a wide circle of collaborators, creating programs with such wide-ranging artists as Daniel Barenboim and Mark Morris, Michael Tilson Thomas and Wu Tong. In 1998, Mr. Ma established Silkroad, a nonprofit organization that seeks to create meaningful change at the intersections of the arts, education and business. Under his artistic direction, Silkroad develops new music, cultural partnerships, education programs, and cross-disciplinary collaborations.His most recent release, “Sing Me Home,” recorded with the Silk Road Ensemble, was released in April 2016 as the companion album to documentary film “The Music of Strangers.” Both the film and the CD snared Grammy nominations this year, and the CD won for Best World Music Album at the Grammy ceremony in February.John Knowles Paine Concert Hall is located at 3 Oxford St. on the Harvard campus; it is a short walk from the Harvard Square Red Line T stop and is wheelchair-accessible. Info at music.fas.harvard | [email protected] | 617495-2791. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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first_img Paralegal regulation panel considers two-tier system Paralegal regulation panel considers two-tier system Mark D. Killian Managing Editor The Special Committee to Study Paralegal Regulation decided to take another crack at hammering out a regulatory scheme for the state’s paralegals when it met in Miami during the Bar’s Midyear Meeting.The committee — which has set aside an earlier recommendation that would have created a paralegal section within the Bar with voluntary membership and a charge to continue to study the thorny issues related to regulation — is now considering a two-tier system for paralegals.Tier one would include all those who meet the current definition of a paralegal found in Bar Rule 10-2.1. That essentially holds a paralegal is a person qualified by education, training, or work experience, who under the supervision of a lawyer performs delegated substantive work for which the lawyer is responsible.Tier two paralegals would have to meet more stringent experience, educational, and, perhaps, testing and continuing education criteria to be able to hold themselves out as a “Florida registered paralegal” or a similar term that has yet to be agreed upon.Chair Ross Goodman said the earlier voluntary section recommendation was an attempt to get a plan on the table before the start of the 2006 legislative session.That recommendation was not met with much enthusiasm, and prompted Rep. Juan Zapata, R-Miami, a member of the committee, and Sen. Nancy Argenziano, R-Crystal River, to refile paralegal regulation bills that would set up a regulatory system under the Department of Business and Professional Regulation. Those bills have the backing of the Florida Alliance of Paralegal Associations, an organization that brings together the statewide Paralegal Association of Florida, Inc., and six other regional paralegal groups in the state.The Florida Bar Board of Governors has voted to oppose HB 395 and SB 906 as originally filed because it believes that more meaningful recognition of the paralegal profession can be achieved by continuing the discussion with the legal profession and judicial branch.“As far as I’m concerned, we are basically back to square one,” Goodman told the committee as it kicked off two days of workshop meetings in Miami. “We need to start at the beginning and take the issues one-by-one. . . and see if we can get some kind of resolution.”Goodman said the panel is no longer working under any deadline. After the Miami workshops, he added, “I think we have come a long way in reaching consensus on the issues that we can reach consensus on and the more thorny issues are still out there.”To get the ball rolling, the committee sidestepped, for now, the ultimate question of whether paralegals should be regulated, in favor of building consensus on what a regulatory scheme should look like if, indeed, a regulatory system is put into place.“I think the committee as a whole will be pleased with what we came up with [the two- tier system] and I think it is going to be easier for us to reach resolution,” Goodman said.Committee member Karen McLead, a former president of the Paralegal Association of Florida, agreed.“I want to believe we are going to move forward and answer that final question — Is paralegal regulation necessary at all? — which seems to be the million dollar question,” McLead said. “I hope that they [lawyers] have seen that it is necessary and it will help to distinguish and identify the profession.”McLead said she supports the working concept of a two-tier system because lawyers would balk at any plan that does not allow them to make the decision that someone who meets the definition Rule 10-2.1 can still be called a paralegal.“I think they still want to be able to have the ability to hire persons and call them paralegals if they feel they meet the definition of 10-2.1,” McLead said, noting also that selling the idea of a two-tier system to the paralegal community may also prove challenging.“But I think when they understand the criteria that would be in place for tier two, and the identification that would come with the tier two status, it will make it more palatable,” McLead said.PAF President Johnna Philips said after the workshops she thinks the attorneys and paralegal members of the panel have a better understanding of each other’s perspectives.“I think the attorneys will find this two-tier system to be a more palatable system for them,” Philips said. “It is not everything we would hope to see, but I think both sides realize that there has to be an art of compromise here.”Committee member John Hume, however, said he believes a majority of the committee opposes regulation, but will offer the Board of Governors a plan for regulating the title paralegal, if the board chooses to pursue that route.He said the two-tier plan avoids most of the major problems he sees in the pending legislation, in that the committee’s draft does not deprive anyone of an existing right to call themselves a paralegal, but only adds a new optional classification of paralegal. He likened the plan to the Bar’s certification program.Yet, Hume sees no public benefit from a regulatory scheme, saying there is no great public harm that will be prevented by regulation of the term paralegal.“I would emphasize that we are not talking about anything other than title and the title we are talking about is Florida registered paralegal,” Hume said. “We are regulating only the use of the title.”Philips, however, contends that regulating paralegals will help protect the public.“Attorneys are charging their clients for paralegal time, and at least with some set of minimum standards the consuming public will have some measure of confidence that the person they are paying for is actually familiar with the legal system and some basic understanding of how different areas of the law interrelate to one another,” Philips said.She added that paralegals are regularly being asked to do more substantive work that requires a greater knowledge of the law, and establishing professional standards is a natural progression of a continuously evolving profession.Goodman said the standards for a tier two paralegal need to be high, but also obtainable.“It needs to be high enough to make that second tier something that is worth having, something the paralegal can be proud of and the attorney can tout,” Goodman said. “The attorney can turn to their clients and say, ‘Look, I’ve got 28 paralegals on staff and all of them are Florida Bar certified; they are the crème de la crème,’ and I think there is some value to the lawyers to be able to say that.”Goodman said he thinks the majority of the committee will be able to reach a consensus on a regulatory scheme, but what it will look like in its final form is still up in the air. Goodman said he also is not opposed to sending the Board of Governors a majority and minority report.“There was a lot of open discussion, a lot of issues raised, and when we reached consensus nobody’s arms were being twisted,” Goodman said. “If we can build on that momentum, I think we are going to have a successful product to put before the Board of Governors.”Goodman said one of the major hurdles the committee was able to clear was the question of billing.“The issue for lawyers was are we going to come up with regulation that is going to tell lawyers what they can or cannot bill for in terms of work that a paralegal does,” Goodman said. “And the consensus is that that is not an issue on the table.”Goodman said the committee supports maintaining the status quo for how lawyers bill for nonlawyer personnel time. Philips said the plan is to allow an attorney to bill based on the task and not on the person who is actually doing the work.The pending legislative bills specify that only service performed by duly licensed paralegals would be compensable.“removing the limitation of the award of attorneys’ fees, and by allowing people to continue to use the term paralegal, I think that that overcomes the two major objections,” Hume said.“I’m optimistic that when the committee’s work is said and done that we will come up with a plan that will be acceptable to both sides and will be a benefit to the legal profession and the consumers as a whole,” Philips said. “It was a very positive weekend.” What Others Are Saying “It is our belief that professional regulation in inevitable; therefore, we seek credence of the paralegal profession through The Florida Bar rather than allow the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation to monitor and control Florida paralegals.” — Lori M. Spangler, Chief Paralegal and Support Staff Office of the Public Defender, Ninth Circuit “We are concerned that the regulation is more of an attempt to limit competition within the field than to truly improve the standards and quality of legal services provided.” — Patrick Alexander, Director University of Miami Paralegal Studies Program “[W]e seek regulation in order to ensure that those entering the profession do so under similar educational standards and guidelines so the public, lawyers, and the courts can be assured of minimum competency levels for those that use the title ‘paralegal’ in the state.” — Debbie Cristello, President Suncoast Chapter of the Paralegal Association of Florida, Inc. “Ultimately, the responsibility for the quality of service and the competency of legal employees rests with their attorney employers. Training and supervision by the employer are key to ensuring the proper use of legal assistants. Regulations, which establish a cumbersome and expensive bureaucracy, increase the cost of legal services, restrict the attorney’s ability to manage his or her own staff, are counterproductive and anticompetitive.” — Julius J. Zschau, Chair Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section “I know too many secretaries that call themselves ‘paralegals’ because they work for an attorney. The have no paralegal training and do not perform the duties of a paralegal but still use the designation without the benefit of any paralegal education.” — Linda Witt Certified Legal Assistant, Sarasota “I oppose paralegal regulation and licensure and believe that such regulation or licensing lends a misleading appearance of proficiency and ability, and ultimately invites the unauthorized practice of law. A paralegal should have no responsibility separate from the attorney’s responsibility.” — U.S. Bankruptcy Judge A. Jay Cristol, Miami Tier two paralegals would have to meet stringent criteria to hold themselves out as Florida registered paralegals February 15, 2006 Regular Newslast_img read more

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first_img Press Release,  Statement Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today vetoed Senate Bill 1. The governor released the following statement:“I understand the need for pension reform, but this legislation provides no immediate cost savings to taxpayers and does not maximize long-term savings for taxpayers. We need pension reform that works. There are provisions within this legislation, which as part of a comprehensive pension proposal I could support; however, Senate Bill 1 does not address the problems facing our pension system comprehensively and fairly.“The plan I delivered to the General Assembly would save at least $10 billion, while at the same time ensuring that the commonwealth will make all actuarially required contributions to fund our future pension obligations and reducing the burden placed on the commonwealth and school districts in the short term. Since my budget proposal I have found and shared an added $7 billion in savings, a total of $17 billion in savings to our retirement systems, which I have communicated to the General Assembly. Furthermore, the plan I proposed would reduce the over $700 million in fees paid annually to Wall Street firms to manage our investments, Senate Bill 1 does not address these excessive fees.“This legislation was pushed through without negotiation by Republicans along with an unbalanced budget, and this legislation produces no savings to our deficit in the next fiscal year. We need a comprehensive agreement on the issues facing Pennsylvania including education funding, the need for a commonsense severance tax on natural gas, balancing our budget for the long term, and pension reform.“Furthermore, during my consideration of this legislation, it became clear that this legislation violates federal tax law as it would be considered an impermissible cash or deferred arrangement (CODA). In addition, the bill forces newly-hired employees to pay down the unfunded liability of existing pension plans, caused by years of government failure to make necessary payments, while denying those new employees the full benefit of their contributions.“I urge the General Assembly to resume negotiations and work to enact a comprehensive plan that will balance our budget, invest in our schools, make oil and gas companies pay their fair share, and solve Pennsylvania’s pension problem.” July 09, 2015 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Governor Wolf Vetoes Senate Bill 1last_img read more

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first_imgAn iconic piece of Donegal landscape was highlighted in a special feature on Creedon’s Atlas of Ireland last night.The new RTE travel series, presented by John Creedon, took to the skies over Donegal to view the Celtic Cross tree formation in Killea.The 200m-long cross was planted by local forester Liam Emery, who sadly died before he could see the marvel that he had created. The cross is a visual treat for people flying over the land, as Liam had carefully planted larch trees among evergreen Sitka spruce over a two acre area. The larch turns yellow in autumn, revealing a perfect Celtic Cross shape.Creedon’s Atlas of Ireland. Image: RTESunday night’s premiere of Creedon’s Atlas of Ireland saw John travelling to Donegal to meet Liam’s son Declan and his former colleague Bernard.They shared some loving tributes to Liam’s dedication to his work. They also expressed their sadness over Liam’s passing, which was as a result of an injury sustained from a kayaking accident, and how did not live to see his plantation come to fruition.“It was tough to take, but it’s nice when you’re driving out this road getting to look at what he left behind,” Declan said. The Celtic Cross planted into the landscape between Killea and Manor. Picture by Darren Sheaffer.Creedon’s Atlas of Ireland is themed on the study of Irish placenames, and the feature on Donegal concluded with a look at the meaning of Killea.While the village name translates to Cill Fhéich (Fiach’s Church), John Creedon related the meaning of ‘Kill’ to the words for forest (coill) and for church (cill) to say that the name is a fitting tribute to the spirit of the forest and the spirit of the late Mr Emery.You can watch the episode on RTE Player now: https://www.rte.ie/player/series/creedon-s-atlas-of-ireland/SI0000005960?epguid=IH000379662Donegal’s famous forest cross features in new RTE series was last modified: August 13th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Creedon’s Atlas of IrelandKillealiam emerylast_img read more

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first_imgIn addition, India would be clearly the third-largest economy in the world by 2050, well ahead of Japan and not too far behind the US. The study points out, however, that Nigeria’s high growth rate is also subject to a “considerable degree of uncertainty due to its need to address issues relating to current over-dependence on oil and various institutional and governance issues that have held back its growth potential in some past periods”. The report finds that, even when looking at GDP growth at market exchange rate rankings, the overtaking process is slower, but still inexorable: the Chinese economy would still be likely to be larger than that of the US before 2035, and the E7 would overtake the G7 before 2040. Challenges, opportunities for business “These will be highly competitive, so this is not an easy option – it requires long-term investment – but without it Western companies will increasingly be playing in the slow lane of history if they continue to focus on markets in North America and Western Europe.” It ranks South Africa as the world’s twentieth largest economy in 2009, both in terms of purchasing power parity, with the economy worth US$508-billion, and at market exchange rate rankings, with the economy worth $286-billion. “In many ways this renewed dominance of China and India, with their much larger populations, is a return to the historical norm prior to the Industrial Revolution of the late 18th and 19th centuries that caused a shift in global economic power to Western Europe and the US – this temporary shift in power is now going into reverse,” said one of the report’s authors, PriceWaterhouseCoopers economist John Hawksworth. By 2020, China is expected to pass the US as the largest economy in the world, while India could also overtake the US economy, in purchasing power parity terms, by 2050. At the same time, the report predicts, rapid growth in consumer markets in the major emerging economies, associated with a fast-growing middle class, will provide new opportunities for Western companies that can establish themselves in these markets. Return to the ‘historical norm’ According to “The World in 2050”, this changing world order poses both challenges and opportunities for businesses in the current advanced economies.center_img However, by 2050, South Africa is projected to drop out of the top-20 ranking, where it could be replaced by Nigeria, which has a higher average annual growth rate till 2050 (at 7.9%), a higher average annual growth rate per capita of five percent, and higher average annual population growth rate of 1.5%. Released last week, the revised version of “The World in 2050” also predicts that in purchasing power parity terms, the E7 group of emerging countries (China, India, Brazil, Russia, Mexico, Indonesia and Turkey) will overtake the G7 economies (US, Japan, Germany, UK, France, Italy and Canada) by 2020. Nigeria has the largest expected contribution from population growth over the next 40 years, which will significantly increase its working age population contributing to GDP growth. An updated study by consultancy firm PriceWaterhouseCoopers, “The World in 2050”, projects that South Africa will be the seventh fastest-growing economy between now and 2050, with an average annual real growth rate of five percent. “Our key conclusion is that the global financial crisis has further accelerated the shift in global economic power to the emerging economies,” the report says. The original version was published in 2006, before the 2008-09 crisis. 10 January 2011 With reference to South Africa, the report projects an average annual population growth rate of 0.3%, and an average annual GDP (gross domestic product) per capita growth of 3.6%, from now until 2050. “On the one hand, competition from emerging market multinationals will increase steadily over time and the latter will move up the value chain in manufacturing and some services, including financial services given the weakness of the Western banking system after the crisis.” SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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first_imgLearn how to protect your video production gear and safeguard your set with this video tutorial.Professional audio and video technicians have been using this tried-and-true coiling method for years. When you have to move fast, a tangled cable can be costly, embarrassing, and (frankly) inexcusable. This video cites two true stories that relate directly to tangled cable and rope. Spend a little time perfecting the “Over and Under” method, and you can respond to any urgent cable request with confidence!Have a tangled mess of cords, cables, and rope? Avoid potentially dangerous situations by properly wrapping your cables.If you need to retrain your cables to properly wrap them, try setting them out in the sun for a few hours. You can also soak rope then lay it in the sun. Now your cables and rope are ready to coil.Wrapping Cables (XLR, BNC, etc) and Extension CordsThis technique works both clockwise and counterclockwise — perfect for both right-handed or left-handed crew members.Step 1: Grab your cable and start with an overhand loop.Step 2: Flip the cable, and roll it underhand to create the second loop.Step 3: Repeat overhand and underhand until the cable coils entirely in a circle.Step 4: Use a velcro tie or string to tie the cable in place. It’s best to keep the tie attached to the male end of the cable so it doesn’t interfere with any microphones or equipment you may plug into.Do not wrap the cable around itself and connect the ends. That is an improper technique that can shorten the lifespan of you audio and video cables.Have tips for protecting your video gear? Let us know in the comments.last_img read more

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first_imgChina’s Yi Siling won the first gold medal of the London Olympics after shooting her way to glory in the women’s 10-meter air rifle event in London on Saturday.Yi shot consistently well on her way to a score of 502.9 to take gold at the Royal Artillery Barracks by 0.7 points from Polish athlete Sylwia Bogacka on 502.2.”Very exciting. Very happy. I’m very grateful to China. And to my mother and father who I love very much,” Yi said.Bogacka had entered with an advantage after setting the highest score in qualifying and held the lead with three shots remaining in the final.Two comparatively low scores from Bogacka dropped her to third before she re-took second place from China’s Yu Dan on a dramatic final shot.Bogacka said that the atmosphere was better than in Beijing four years ago.”Here the competition was much friendlier. People were smiling. It was much better than Beijing,” she said.Yu Dan scored 501.5 to take bronze.Russia’s Daria Vdovina had entered the final in a strong third position, but poor shooting early on destroyed her hopes of a medal, and she finished eighth and last.Heavily pregnant Malaysian shooter Nur Suryani Mohd Taibi earlier failed to make the final, finishing 34th in qualifying.last_img read more

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