Tag: Makayla

first_imgA new pilot program will help up to 80 students get ready for careers in Nova Scotia’s growing technology sector.The province, IBM, and Nova Scotia Community College (NSCC) are partnering to offer the Technology Advantage Program inspired by IBM’s Pathways in Technology Early College High School, known as the P-TECH model. “Creating opportunities for young people to see a future for themselves in Nova Scotia is an important priority for government,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “This new and unique program will help address future labour market needs in our province’s growing technology sector. The six-year program is open to students who attend one of the junior high schools that feed into Cole Harbour District High School, J.L. Ilsley High School and Yarmouth Consolidated Memorial High School. Students will be in the program from grades 9 to 12, then move on to the Nova Scotia Community College, where they will work toward a two-year technology diploma. Government will cover tuition costs. “We are designing programs and opportunities to fit student needs and help them succeed,” said Zach Churchill, Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development. “This is a great example and I’m excited to partner with IBM and NSCC to help students get ready for careers in a sector where there is need and opportunity.” P-TECH was created in 2011, and it opens new pathways by creating a direct connection between high school, college and career. By the end of 2019, the model will be in more than 200 schools across 14 countries. Early results in the United States show increasing graduation rates and employment. Students in the Nova Scotia program will have access to a range of workplace experiences that include mentorship opportunities, internships and co-operative education placement, in addition to classroom learning. Upon graduation, students will be guaranteed interviews for available IBM jobs. “As business, government and education leaders, we all have a role to play to prepare our students for the new technology-driven opportunities of the future,” said Ayman Antoun, president, IBM Canada. “The skills gap is mounting as new technologies transform industries and jobs. “The IBM P-TECH education model is all about preparing the next generation of our workforce and providing new pathways for young people to be successful.” The pilot program will launch in September. Families of students eligible to take part in the pilot will receive more information in the coming weeks. Government will invest an initial $2 million this year to start the program.last_img read more

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Mr. Šešelj is being monitored in a Dutch prison hospital after he was transferred yesterday from the detention unit of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), which is based in The Hague, the Tribunal said in a press statement, citing concern for the accused’s well-being.Although he continues to drink water, Mr. Šešelj has declined food, medicine and medical care since 11 November, and the ICTY said a medical necessity requiring intervention could arise in the near future if he does not start eating again.Mr. Šešelj, 52, has refused to allow any doctor of Dutch nationality to assess his condition, but has said he will accept a doctor from France or Serbia. However, he refused to meet a French doctor who visited the Dutch prison hospital today.The Tribunal statement said the reasons provided by Mr Šešelj for his hunger strike keep changing, ranging from his defence counsel to the ability to receive unmonitored visits from his wife.Earlier this week, ICTY judges assigned defence counsel to the accused, saying he had persistently obstructed the proper conduct of the trial since resuming self-representation in late October.“But he has also made other less publicized demands, such as that the Tribunal approach a foreign State in order to unfreeze assets he holds in overseas bank accounts,” the statement noted.The president of the Serbian Radical Party, Mr. Šešelj faces charges of crimes against humanity and others relating to the persecutions of Croat, Muslim and other non-Serb people and their expulsions from area of Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and the Vojvodina region of Serbia, between August 1991 and September 1993.Prosecutors allege Mr. Šešelj participated in a joint criminal enterprise with former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, among others, that led to the extermination and expulsion of non-Serb people.In its statement the ICTY stressed that it is keeping officials from Serbia informed at all times, and has also invited the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) to visit its detention unit and the Dutch prison hospital. read more

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