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first_imgLast night, Widespread Panic continued their run of shows in Florida by opening up a two-night stand in St. Augustine, FL. Playing at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre, Panic delivered a top-notch show with a very special surprise at the end, as the Florida-based husband and wife duo Derek Trucks and Susan Tedeschi emerged for the two song encore to close out the night.Panic’s show opened up with “Hope In A Hopeless World,” and featured hits like “Glory,” “Cotton Was King,” “Tail Dragger” and more in the first set. A fun highlight came in the second set, when Steve Lopez joined the band on shaker for a cover of War’s “Slippin’ Into Darkness.” After a “Chilly Water” jam that included a “Drums” breakdown, the band ended the second set and proceeded into the grand finale of the evening.When WSP returned for the encore, John Bell addressed the crowd and jokingly said, “we found this sweet little vagrant couple out there on the street, and we’re letting them play a few tunes. That’s how rock and roll does and is!.” From there, they launched into a jammy version of blues standard “Good Morning School Girl,” with the four-guitar attack of Tedeschi, Trucks, Bell and Jimmy Herring rolling in fine force. They finished up the show with a version of Joe Cocker’s “High Time We went,” which you can watch below courtesy of Fred Ramadan.Listen to the full audio from the show below, courtesy of Chris from Jam Buzz.The collaboration was reminiscent of Derek & Susan’s recent sit in with Panic, which came aback in April of this year. Watch the pro-shot video here. Panic will close out their fall run with one more show in St. Augustine, tonight.Check out last night’s full setlist below, courtesy of PanicStream.Setlist: Widespread Panic at St. Augustine Amphitheatre, St. Augustine, FL – 9/23/16Set 1 Hope In A Hopeless World, Glory, Worry, Cotton Was King, C Brown, 1×1, Christmas Katie > Radio Child, Tail Dragger (62 mins)Set 2 Postcard > Impossible > Slippin’ Into Darkness*, St Louis, Rock, Proving Ground > Jack > Chilly Water > Drums > Chilly Water (75 mins)Encore: Good Morning Little Schoolgirl**, High Time We Went** (24 mins)Notes * w/ Steve Lopez on shaker** w/ Derek Trucks on guitar; Susan Tedeschi on guitar and vocalslast_img read more

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first_imgThurgood Marshall is revered as a titan of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement, the architect of the landmark court case that ended legal segregation in America’s public schools, and the first African-American Supreme Court justice. Yet for five of his former law clerks gathered Wednesday at Harvard Law School (HLS), he was more than that.For Mark Tushnet, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law, Marshall was a messenger of hope and courage to African-Americans who endured the injustices of the Jim Crow South. As a criminal defense lawyer for the NAACP in the 1940s and ’50s, Marshall often traveled to the segregated South to defend black men who were falsely accused of rape and murder in hostile courts packed with all-white juries, in towns with influential Ku Klux Klan members.“When he came to town to do trials, it was as if Jesus Christ came to town,” said Tushnet, who clerked for Marshall in the ’70s and has written several books about the noted justice. “People would come out to see him. In Oklahoma, kids from an elementary school were taken to the courtroom to see him defending. And the very fact that it was a black man doing a criminal defense, standing up on the stage, it mattered to those kids.”For Randall Kennedy, Michael R. Klein Professor of Law, who clerked for Marshall in the ’80s, the associate justice was a source of pride, lifting the spirits and the consciousness of black Americans who were treated as second-class citizens.“I grew up with the name of Thurgood Marshall as part of the soundtrack of my life,” said Kennedy. “He was Mr. Civil Rights. I remember my father talking about watching Marshall argue a case in 1948. What he remembered was that the judges and the opposing lawyers called Marshall ‘Mr. Marshall.’ And that was a big deal given the etiquette of the Jim Crow South, when black men were not called Mister.”Leighton Watson ’20 asks the panel a question. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerFor Martha Minow, former dean of Harvard Law School, Carter Professor of General Jurisprudence, and University Distinguished Service Professor, who also clerked for Marshall, he was the embodiment of a deep commitment to social justice and faith in the power of the rule of law to bring equal rights to all eventually.“His faith in the rule of law and the legal system was profound, even though he wrote the most searing critique of the bicentennial of the American Constitution I’ve read,” said Minow. “He was not at all naive, but he was someone who modeled for the world that it’s possible to use reason in courts to tear down oppression.”At the panel discussion held in conjunction with the upcoming release of the movie “Marshall,” which opens in theaters Oct. 13, HLS professors who served as Marshall’s law clerks recalled and explored his life and legacy. Directed by Reginald Hudlin ’83, the film features Marshall as a young attorney in a 1941 criminal case in which he defended a black chauffeur and butler falsely accused of sexual assault and kidnapping by his employer, a white socialite.The panel was moderated by Tomiko Brown-Nagin, Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law, director of the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race & Justice, and professor of history in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and Kenneth Mack, the Lawrence D. Biele Professor of Law.When the panelists were asked to talk about Marshall’s personality, they shared smiles of recognition, and went on to tell tales about his larger-than-life presence, his impish sense of humor, and his masterful storytelling abilities.Minow recalled that when she went for her job interview with Marshall, she was fighting a cold and feeling sick. Marshall recommended that she follow his father’s home remedy. “He said to me, ‘You take quinine and whiskey, and you leave out the quinine,’” said Minow, to laughter in the room.“He was a formidable person in all respects,” recalled another former clerk, William Fisher, WilmerHale Professor of Intellectual Property Law and faculty director of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society. “He was big, gruff, and impatient with pretense. If we ever got a little bit too forthright, he’d point to the wall and say, ‘I don’t see your name up there signed by the president of the United States?’ He kept us in check.”Marshall regularly regaled clerks with stories of his life growing up in Baltimore, of his dangerous journeys to the South working for the NAACP, and his tenure on the Supreme Court. Tushnet recalled a story Marshall told in which he said he narrowly escaped being lynched in Tennessee by breathing into a judge’s face to prove he was not drunk. “The judge released him, and he left town,” said Tushnet. “And Marshall, as he tells the story, says, ‘I wasn’t drunk then, but let me tell you, an hour later …’”As much as the clerks said they relished listening to his spellbinding stories, they treasured the lessons they learned while working in his chambers.Carol Steiker, Henry J. Friendly Professor of Law and Special Adviser for Public Service, said she developed a lifelong interest in death penalty law during her clerkship with Marshall.“The death penalty was a big deal in his chambers,” she recalled. “He would tell us stories about early in his career when he represented defendants at trial as well as on appeal in death penalty cases. Mostly they were black men accused of crimes against white victims in the South. And one thing he said often is that he always knew when he had an innocent client because that’s when the jury would sentence him to life imprisonment instead of death. And that really stuck in my head.”All of the panelists highlighted Marshall’s legacy of advancing the Civil Rights Movement through the law, most prominently in the historic school desegregation case Brown v. Board of Education, in his 1967–1991 term on the Supreme Court, and in his extraordinary and courageous earlier career as a lawyer fighting for racial and social justice in a violent era. Supreme Court Associate Justice Elena Kagan, who clerked for Marshall in 1987–1988, has called him the greatest lawyer of the 20th century.When HLS student Leighton Watson asked the former clerks whether they thought Marshall would still believe that the legal system, as opposed to activism or politics, was the most effective route to achieving social justice, it was Minow who replied.“I think that today, the courts are one tool, but they’re very limited for mass social change, for redistributing resources, for changing hearts and minds,” she said. “Thurgood Marshall was strategic, but he was very pragmatic. He would use the tools that would work. He’d use social science if that worked, he’d use experts if that worked, he’d use the media if that worked. That’s what I would recommend, along with his advice, ‘Choose your battles.’ That was his advice, and I think about that every day.”last_img read more

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first_imgBEIJING (AP) — An official indicator of China’s manufacturing activity has weakened for a second consecutive month in January, following outbreaks of domestic COVID-19 cases that affected the operations of some industries. The purchasing managers’ index for China’s manufacturing sector fell to 51.3 in January, down 0.6 percentage points from December, according to data from the National Bureau of Statistics. Readings above 50 indicate expansion of the manufacturing industry, while a reading below it reflects a contraction. The indicators for China’s service industry also dipped in January amid the local coronavirus outbreaks. The PMI for China’s non-manufacturing sector came in at 52.4 in January, down from 55.7 in December.last_img read more

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first_imgSaint Mary’s students gained a glimpse into competing views of feminism last night during the lecture titled “Warrior Women vs. Ragpickers: Divergent Paths in Contemporary Feminism” last night in the Stapleton Lounge. Mary Caputi, political science professor at California State University Long Beach, explored two camps of contemporary feminism in her lecture and said critical thinking should play a more significant role in analyzing modern feminism. Caputi also taught at Saint Mary’s College in the early 1990s. “A lot in our culture equates feminism with consumerism, liberation and facile abuses of power. We need to use critical thinking skills to analyze what is really presented in feminism,” Caputi said. Caputi said the two schools of thought in contemporary feminism can best be described by the nicknames of the “New Girl Order” and “ragpicker feminism.” “New Girl Order can also be referred to as wake-up-and-smell-the-lip-gloss feminism or stiletto feminism,” Caputi said. “This type is very much centered on the motto ‘feminism is whatever I as an individual say it is.’” Caputi said this school of thought often lacks the skills of critical thinking. “This feminism celebrates the neoliberal of current capital and global capital,” Caputi said. “It often lacks the ability to step back and ask why money, power and sex are being offered.” Caputi said the New Girl Order is based on rugged American individualism. It aggressively uses power and risks buying into models of masculinity, she said. Caputi said she believes ragpicker feminism, the second school of thought, is the better path in the diverging road of contemporary feminism. This feminism focuses on more than the individual through an analytical lens, she said. “Feminists should be like ragpickers,” Caputi said. “They need to have their eyes open to focus on what got left out. They need to search for what is part of the mix, but didn’t get a voice.” Ragpicker feminism aims to help those who are oppressed and specifically looks at economic and sociopolitical political problems within the global community, she said. “This school of thought wants to use critical thinking to help anyone who identifies as a feminist, whether it be a man or women, ask the question of how power is being used,” Caputi said. Stacy Davis, associate professor of religious studies and coordinator for the Women’s Studies Program, said it is important to recognize feminism in its multiple contemporary forms. “On this campus specifically, I think a lot of people believe feminism is something that other people did,” Davis said. “It is often marginalized or diminished without truly knowing the different ways you can be a feminist and use feminist theory.” Caputi said society needs to practice ragpicker feminism more than New Girl Order feminism. “It is necessary that we adopt the mindset of the ragpicker because feminism is not an issue only about women, but also issues that concern the world,” she said.last_img read more

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first_imgVermont Auditor of Accounts Tom Salmon, who was rebuffed by the Democratic leadership last spring, announced today that he was switching parties and will join the Republican Party. Salmon won the position of state auditor as a Democrat in 2006 when he beat one-term incumbent Republican Randy Brock. That race saw Brock apparently win re-election in a very tight race, before a re-count gave the race to Salmon by 102 votes. Salmon cited the lack of fiscal responsibility among legislative leaders during the debate over the state budget. Salmon had offered to mediate discussions between Republican Governor James Douglas and the Democratically controlled Legislature, but was turned down by Speaker of the House Shap Smith. He said the Republicans are better able to manage the fiscal matters of the state, as represented by Governor Douglas.Salmon further said he will likely run for re-election for Auditor, but there is “a 10 percent chance,” he will run for governor or lieutenant governor instead. Several Republicans are deferring their decisions on 2010 until Lieutenant Governor Brian Dubie decides what, if any, position he will run for. Dubie has indicated he is considering a run for governor. Douglas has already stated he will not seek re-election and will not run for any office in 2010. Salmon made his announcement at the State House shortly after 11 am on Tuesday September 8, 2009.Salmon, 46, has served in Iraq for long tours of duty in the US Navy Reserve while also holding the post of auditor. Thomas M Salmon is the son of the former Vermont Governor Thomas P Salmon, who served from 1973-1977 as a Democrat. The elder Salmon served as a surrogate during his son’s re-election campaign because serving military cannot also campaign for office. Salmon met little resistance in being re-elected last year.Vermont Business Magazine conducted a Q&A with Tom Salmon December 2007 with Robert Smith. In that interview he explained why he ran for auditor:”I ran for state auditor, because as a Rockingham Selectman, I had moved from a simmer to a boil about how fiscal management was occurring in the state. I really didn’t think that anyone was taking responsibility for the fiscal management of the parts of the state. Prior to being a selectman, I go back to December 2005. I’m a Navy Reservist, a Seabee, construction battalion, dirt sailors – we’re never on a ship, so when people see us in our greens they say, ‘Look mommy, it’s an Army man!’ I was in Gulfport, Mississippi, in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. That situation moved me to want to commit to public service. I decided when I came home that I was going to run for the select board in Rockingham. The finances were a mess, the morale was not good, the divisive situation over buying the dam – you were here so you know.”Salmon is a CPA who was born and raised in Bellows Falls. He earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Boston College and was trained in auditing at Coopers and Lybrand (now known at Price Waterhouse Coopers) in both Hartford, Conn., and Los Angeles, Calif. He attained CPA status in 1993 and worked with a small public accounting firm in Southern California and later in Southern Vermont. Tom also became a licensed teacher and taught in the inner city of Los Angeles while continuing his accounting work.In 2002, Salmon and family returned to Bellows Falls until moving to St. Johnsbury. He is a former member of the Rockingham Selectboard, and is a member of the Vermont Society of Certified Public Accountants, the Certified Fraud Examiners Association, AICPA, and a member of various boards including the Three River Valley Business and Educational Partnership.Here is a copy of the letter Salmon sent to his supporters:”September 5, 2009Dear Friend,   It is an honor to serve  as Auditor for the State of Vermont. In 2006, I was elected as a Democrat. In 2008, I was re-elected on the Democratic/Republican ticket. 2010 will be different.I am changing my political affiliation to align myself with the party closest to my core beliefs. It is my belief that the VT Republican party is closest to accepting the realities of our times; and is therefore the party best equipped to manage the very real and troubling economic and social conditions which confront us not only today, but in the coming decade.As many of you know, in the face of the enormous fiscal crisis, I have sounded the alarm for new thinking, responsible budgeting, meaningful long-term planning and painful prioritization.When I returned home from Iraq, I witnessed first-hand a budget process rife with deficiencies and dysfunction.  There was little balance in the debate.As a Certified Public Accountant, I recently completed my required Ethics course for re-licensing.  The Professional Code of Conduct demands that I act with integrity, objectivity and independence. As Auditor, I have preached that Vermont is on an unsustainable track we cannot tax ourselves out of. I believe the majority of Vermonters do not want to see tax increases as a consequence of poor planning.  However, without major restructuring of human services, corrections management and public education (which together account for some 75% of our expenditures) we are going to find that situation unavoidable. Removing even greater sums of capital out of our job-creating private sector and the budgets of Vermont families will only hasten the ill effects of the current crisis. We all watch a healthcare reform movement focused on increased access rather than A) addressing the root causes of the problem B) fixing Medicaid and Medicare or C) promoting incentives and personal responsibility.  The big losers are our young people, the vulnerable elderly population and the viability of Vermont’s 1778 motto of “Freedom and Unity.”I am a believer in the America of hard work and “get oneself upstream” with a combination of personal commitment and external support.  I’m not a believer that all of our future tax dollars should go to interest on debt or “education, medication and incarceration.”  In the current form of these primarily government-controlled expenditures, this is a path leading to a dangerous imbalance of our “Freedom and Unity.”  Economic freedom is an essential component in achieving and maintaining political freedom.  Over the more than 200 years of our nation’s founding, too many of our fine soldiers have died for the protection of these freedoms. Thank you for the opportunity to serve you with full commitment and transparency. I promise to do my best to perform the job Vermonters have elected me to do.Thomas M. Salmon CPAVermont State Auditor”last_img read more

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first_imgCentral Vermont Public Service reported this monrinng that an army of CVPS line crews, assisted by 17 other Vermont crews and 23 crews from Connecticut, New Hampshire and New York, are in full force in Windsor and Bennington counties today. About 1,545 customer outages of the more than 12,000 affected after Monday’s snow and ice storm are left to restore.Most customers should have their power back on by late tonight, but complete restoration could carry into Wednesday, especially in the hard-hit areas around Springfield.‘We’re flooding Bennington and Windsor counties with crews today,’ said CVPS spokeswoman Christine Rivers. ‘There are still hundreds of tree limbs, lines and damaged equipment to repair in those areas, so the going will be slow today, but we expect to make great progress.’CVPS crews and contractors battled the elements yesterday, cutting their way through ice-laden tree and tree limbs in southern Vermont, and whiteout road conditions, and in some cases impassable roads, in central and northern Vermont. Field crews reported a quarter to a half an inch of ice in southern Vermont, and close to an inch on Mt. Ascutney.‘Ice damage is among the most troublesome a utility can experience, and since temperatures haven’t risen to allow the ice to melt yet, crews and contractors will continue to battle the remaining ice today,’ Rivers said. ‘Crews and support staff will continue to work as quickly as is safely possible until all of our customers have their power restored.’CVPS has moved its own crews to the areas hardest hit, and are being assisted by crews from Ludlow Electric, Vermont Electric Co-op, Green Mountain Power, Bemis Line Construction and Northline Utilities. Crews from Connecticut and New Hampshire joined us last night.Up-to-date outage numbers (by town) can be found at: http://www.cvps.com/CustomerService/outages/default.aspx(link is external) and http://vtoutages.com/(link is external) CVPS offered several safety tips for coping with the outages:* STAY AWAY FROM DOWNED POWER LINES. Don’t touch or even go near downed wires! These wires can be energized and can cause serious injuries or death. If the line is blocking the road or in contact with a vehicle with people inside, call you local police or fire emergency number first. Then call CVPS. Instruct others to keep at least 50 feet away, and keep pets and livestock away as well.* Assume all objects touching the power line are also energized. Never attempt to remove trees or limbs from any utility lines! Notify CVPS of the situation.* If using a generator, read and follow the owner’s manual before starting the generator. Never operate a generator inside any structure or near a structure. Use a transfer switch to ensure electricity is not accidentally fed onto a line where line crews must work.* Keep freezers and refrigerators closed as much as possible to prevent food spoilage.* If power goes out, turn off all electrical appliances except one light so you’ll know when service returns. Then, turn equipment back on slowly.Additional safety tips can be found at: http://www.cvps.com/Safety/StormSafety.aspx(link is external)last_img read more

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first_img Three alleged members of the Mexican Los Zetas cartel were arrested with banners claiming responsibility for the massacre of twenty-seven peasants in Guatemala a week ago, and with a warning to the press to stop publishing news unfavorable to that organization. According to the authorities, Los Zetas entered the rural property Los Cocos last Saturday, in La Libertad, in the department of Petén, around 600 km north of the Guatemalan capital, in search of alleged drug trafficker Otto Salguero, in order to execute him. When they did not find him, they murdered twenty-seven laborers. Since then, the authorities have linked Los Zetas with around five hundred violent incidents, according to a report by the daily Prensa Libre [Free Press], which had access to intelligence reports from the country’s anti-narcotics units. Up to the present, the authorities have seized dozens of vehicles and weapons and have arrested three other suspects, including former member of the military and alleged drug trafficker Álvaro Gómez (Comandante Bruja [Commander Witch]), to whom they attribute the kidnapping and murder of three of Salguero’s family members a day before the massacre. President Álvaro Colom decreed a state of emergency in Petén on Monday and sent hundreds of military and police personnel to try to retake control of the area. By Dialogo May 24, 2011 The texts were signed “Z 200,” the same signature that was left at the scene of the crime using the blood of the victims of the massacre. The detentions – which are in addition to those of three other suspects – reinforce the official hypothesis about the responsibility of Los Zetas, to whom the authorities also attribute massacres of hundreds of people in Mexico. A spokesperson for the National Civil Police explained that the three individuals were detained in the city of Quetzaltenango. The detainees, of Guatemalan origin, were identified as José Arturo Godoy Artola, thirty-two years old, Cristofer José Cardona Chen, twenty years old, and a juvenile. The banners contained a warning to the press, indicating that they should stop publishing news unfavorable to that organization, “before the war is against you; the one who warns is not a traitor.” Los Zetas, made up of former Mexican military personnel, began to extend their tentacles in Guatemala in 2007, and their violent presence became evident on 25 March 2008, when they executed drug trafficker Juan José León, alias Juancho, together with ten other individuals, at a waterfront resort location in Zacapa (in eastern Guatemala). last_img read more

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first_imgBut credit unions also have some advantages over banks.Credit unions have their work cut out for them to catch up with offering the same basic business banking products as banks, Larry Middleman told an audience of 50 credit unions during a webinar on industry trends. On the other hand, credit unions also have some clear advantages over banks, the president/CEO of CU Business Group pointed out.In particular, Middleman, who founded the business services CUSO in 2002, believes credit unions are behind in offering cash management solutions for small businesses. The top products used by small businesses today, he shared, are electronic or automated, including such products as merchant card services, payroll, remote deposit capture, ACH and positive pay. Credit unions are behind in applying automation and technology to their services, an area where banks excel, he said.The cost of offering these electronic services is going down, while system and vendor options rise, according to Middleman, who says there are many avenues for credit unions to advance in this area by outsourcing and forming strategic partnerships with vendors.During the webcast Middleman also discussed financial services needs from the small business perspective. Small businesses cite the lack of credit availability and uneven cash flow as two of their top challenges. Many banks now offer consultative advice in structuring a financial management system to businesses as an added value. Bankers are not only telling business customers about their products, but also helping them design systems to make life easier and benefit their businesses. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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first_imgThe department says the walking trail at Keith Clark Park will remain open as long as people observe social distancing guidelines. SIDNEY, N.Y. (WBNG) — The Village of Sidney Police Department has closed public playgrounds and basketball parks courts due to concerns over the coronavirus. It says the parks will be closed until further notice.last_img

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first_imgThe investors said the deal followed on from their Regent Street partnership, under which the Crown Estate owns 75% of the £3.25bn Regent Street portfolio – consisting of assets adjoining the Pollen Estate holdings – and the GPFG owns 25%.David Shaw, head of the Regent Street Portfolio, said: “With the benefit of our partnership holdings in Regent Street, we recognised the long-term investment opportunity of the Pollen Estate holdings, particularly in their core streets of Savile Row and Cork Street.”Shaw said the two streets had international reputations for tailoring and art galleries, respectively.“The success of these two streets is crucial to the ongoing success of London’s West End as an international destination,” he said.The deal is the largest single property sale undertaken by the Church Commissioners, the Crown Estate said.NBIM said the price it paid was net of the GPFG’s £36.1m share of total existing debt.Property in the Pollen Estate, established in 1812, is situated mainly between Regent Street and Bond Street, and consists of 43 assets.Half of the space is office, and half is retail.The board of the Pollen Estate trustee company will continue to oversee asset management of the portfolio. Norway’s Norges Bank Investment Management (NBIM) and the UK’s Crown Estate have joined forces to buy a majority stake in the Pollen Estate, 730,000 sq ft of property in London’s West End.NBIM, which manages Norway’s former oil fund, the Government Pension Fund Global (GPFG), has paid £343m (€431m) for a 57.8% stake in the estate, and the Crown Estate has acquired a 6.4% holding.The total deal value was £381m, implying the Crown Estate paid £38m for its portion.The two institutional investors bought the total 64.2% stake in the Pollen Estate – spread over four acres – from the Church Commissioners for England, a Church of England endowment charity.last_img read more

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