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first_img Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA By News Highland – June 15, 2020 Pinterest Twitter Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens further Facebook Renewed calls for full-time Garda in Kilmacrennan Google+ Facebook Previous articleCouncil preparing Remote Working Strategy for DonegalNext articleDerry City not convinced with FAI proposals News Highland A man in his early 20s has died following a hit and run in the early hours of this morning in Letterkenny.At approximately 4am, the body of a man was discovered by a road user along the roadway at Windyhall.Gardaí and Emergency Services attended the scene and the man was transferred to Letterkenny University Hospital where he was later pronounced dead.Following an examination of the area, it was identified that the male was struck by a vehicle which failed to remain at the scene.Forensic Collision Investigators are currently at the scene which has been preserved for a full technical examination. The road is currently closed with local diversions in place.Gardaí at Letterkenny are appealing for anyone with information in relation to this incident to come forward. Gardaí are also appealing for any road users who may have camera footage (including dash-cam) who were travelling in the Windyhall area from 1am to 4am to make this footage available to Gardaí.Anyone with information is asked to contact Letterkenny Garda Station on 074 9167100, the Garda Confidential Line on 1800 666 111, or any Garda Station.center_img WhatsApp Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Twitter Homepage BannerNews Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Breaking: Man has died following hit and run in Letterkenny WhatsApp Google+ Community Enhancement Programme open for applications last_img read more

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first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailiStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Here are the scores from Sunday’s sports events:INTERLEAGUE Final  Chi Cubs  11  Minnesota  10   ——   AMERICAN LEAGUE Final  Baltimore       8  L-A Angels    2 Final  Detroit         9  Toronto       1 Final  Tampa Bay       3  Houston       2 Final  Chi White Sox  10  Texas         5 Final  Cleveland      15  Oakland       3 Final  Seattle         1  Kansas City   0 Final  N-Y Yankees    11  Boston        1   ——   NATIONAL LEAGUE Final  N-Y Mets        5  Miami        2 Final  Cincinnati      8  Milwaukee    2 Final  Philadelphia    4  Washington   3, 13 Innings Final  Atlanta         6  St. Louis    5 Final  Pittsburgh      7  San Diego    5 Final  San Francisco   9  Arizona      6 Final  L-A Dodgers     6  Colorado     4Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. Written by July 2, 2018 /Sports News – National Scoreboard Roundup 7/2/18center_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

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first_imgOcean City’s emergency response professionals paid tribute and said thank you to the members of the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) members Wednesday night with a special event at the 6th Street Fire Department Headquarters.On hand to show their appreciation were OC Director of Emergency Services Frank Donato III, Acting Chief of Police Jay Prettyman and Fire Chief Jim Smith. Attendees heard an informative and educational talk by Prettyman which discussed the value the CERT team brings to the City’s public safety efforts.Acting Chief of Police Jay Prettyman addressed the CERT members and discussed the value that they bring to our community.Later in the evening, Donato told OCNJ Daily that CERT members, all unpaid volunteers, play an important role in supporting Police, Fire and EMS personnel at Ocean City’s many community events. He said this was particularly true in the ‘shoulder season’ after Labor Day when the 45 seasonal police officers are no longer available, but numerous large scale events such as the Block Party and the Halloween Parade are taking place.Event support is in addition to the members’ primary role of serving as backup to the first responders in the event of an actual emergency.The members, including those from the newest and largest class of volunteers enjoyed a meet and greet session to compare experiences and to get to know one another in a friendly and informal setting,“Our CERT volunteers are crucial to helping us keep Ocean City safe, and also helping us to smoothly host such events as parades, fireworks, road races and many others,” Donato said. On July 18, 2018, Ocean City Fire Chief James Smith and his firefighters opened the doors of the firehouse on Fifth Street for a summer gathering and barbecue for CERT members.last_img read more

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first_imgAbout Sandra MongerSandra Monger is a multi-award-winning cake designer based in Bath. She is professionally trained in catering, advanced patisserie and sugarcraft and specialises in creating bespoke wedding, civil partnership and celebration cakes. Sandra’s work is much sought-after, due to her innovative designs as well as her attention to detail and customer care. Sandra has an enviable client list and is the recommended supplier to some of the finest venues in the south west. Sandra now teaches the very popular evening classes in cake decoration and sugarcraft at The City of Bath College.In September 2012 Sandra’s work was recognised at the prestigious Baking Industry Awards at London’s Park Lane Hilton, where she was named ’Celebration Cake Maker of the Year’.www.sandramongercakes.co.uk(PHOTO CREDIT: pictures by Robin Pakes) Making a Ranunculus Flower Using Five-Petal CuttersThis tutorial shows you how to make lifelike sugarcrafted ranunculus flowers using five-petal cutters. The technique gives beautiful results and there is no need to cut and ball individual petals.Key Skills – Using cutters, ball-tooling and cupping%%ImageNewsTicker_23883%%EquipmentWire cutters Fine-nosed pliersNumber 2 and 5 piping nozzleA selection of small circle cuttersDry oasisA set of 4 five-petal cutters (45mm, 55mm, 65mm 75mm sizes)Blossom cutter (25mmNon-stick rolling board and rolling pin Flexi-mat or plastic sheeFoam ball pad Ball toolA small artist’s paintbrushA pair of small craft scissorsMaterialsFlower pastPaste colours20-gauge white paper-wrapped stem wireWhite vegetable fatSugar glueCling filmFloral tape (half width pale green)last_img read more

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first_imgGail’s Bakery is to open up a new outlet at Dickens Yard in Ealing.The bakery said it wanted “to make word-class craft bread a part of every community with freshly made breads as well as cakes, sandwiches and salads”, when it opens the shop in autumn 2018, in the new St George West development.Craig Carson, managing director of St George West, said: “We are delighted that Gail’s has chosen to open a new store at Dickens Yard in Ealing. The popular bakery will give local residents yet another reason to visit our new public square and high street at Dickens Yard. I look forward to making further exciting announcements in the coming months.”Tom Molnar, co-founder of Gail’s added: “Ealing is a great community and we’ll look forward to baking in Dickens Yard.”last_img read more

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first_imgWhen Oxford University Press first asked Alex Rehding to write about one of the most iconic compositions in the history of music, the Harvard scholar wondered what he could possibly say that hadn’t been said before.“Part of the challenge with Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony is that it’s the most written-about piece in the Western musical canon,” said Rehding on a recent morning in his Paine Hall office. “My first question was: ‘Do we really need another book on the Ninth?’”His final answer: Yes, we do.In time, the Fanny Peabody Professor of Music realized there was plenty new to say about Beethoven’s last complete symphony in four movements, which includes the stirring chorale finale “Ode to Joy.” And so he signed on to write a book about the Ninth as part of a series on canonical scores.“In the last 20 years, there have been so many new things happening with it,” said Rehding.Those new things range from flash mobs to protest movements to super-slowed-down versions of the piece. Completed after the German composer had gone deaf, the Ninth premiered in Vienna in 1824 to thunderous applause and has since delighted and inspired generations of music lovers. In 1985, “Ode to Joy” became the official anthem of the European Union.Contemporary recordings and performances not only introduce the piece to new generations in interesting, often unconventional ways, said Rehding, they also transform how listeners engage with the work.I’ve never been to a performance that doesn’t touch this collective nerve and uncork a visceral response in the audience. At this point it’s impossible to say how much that’s a reaction to the music itself, or to the sense of symbolic meaning it’s accrued over time.” Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer“On the one hand it is this old warhorse that everybody knows instantly,” he said. “On the other hand it continues to be really inspiring to so many people.”Through the years many have taken the stirring message of brotherhood in “Ode to Joy,” written by German poet and playwright Friedrich Schiller, from the concert hall to the streets. In the 1980s marchers protesting the brutal regime of Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet sang it outside prisons, said Rehding, to let those behind bars know “they were not forgotten.” Similarly, student protesters calling for democracy in China’s Tiananmen Square in 1989 blasted the Ninth on improvised loudspeakers as a symbol of both hope and resistance.Rehding is also fascinated by the way technology has helped transform the symphony for millions by giving it new life both on- and offline. He cited a YouTube video of a Spanish flash mob performance from 2012, an abridged version of the Ninth sponsored by a Catalan bank. The video begins with one tuxedoed bassist and ends with a public square filled with more than 100 professional musicians and singers entertaining a surprised crowd. It has drawn more than 70 million views, thanks in part to the notice of late author and neurologist Oliver Sacks, who included a link to the five minute and 41 second performance in his last tweet before his death.“A beautiful way to perform one of the world’s great musical treasures,” Sacks wrote.Rehding attributed the video’s popularity to the way the musicians deconstruct the complex shape of the movement, as well as our ever-shrinking attention spans.“The form of the last movement is very, very complicated. We have 200 years of attempts to make sense of it. There is no consensus. But in the YouTube version they turn it into a simple strophic form like a song. I think that also tells us something about our contemporary listening habits. It’s six minutes long; that seems to be about the maximum length in our distracted age.”Still, patient listeners will be rewarded by close attention to Leif Inge’s version of the Ninth, said Rehding. In 2002 the Norwegian conceptual artist ran the piece through an algorithm that “stretched out the digital code of a CD recording to make the sounds last 24 hours.”While all the original pitches, harmonies, and rhythms are still there, they are played “unbelievably slowly,” said Rehding, making the piece unrecognizable. And what the careful listener will hear is a series of “grating dissonances.”Those tiny musical clashes are present when even the most accomplished players are changing chords, but are hidden in real time.“When you stretch out that time, these minute imprecisions suddenly become really audible and that’s the thing that you listen for,” said Rehding. “It’s really cool.”In its day Beethoven’s piece was something of an outlier, starting with what Morton B. Knafel Professor of Music Thomas Kelly once described as “cosmic background sound,” and breaking with tradition by incorporating voices into a symphonic work. But its enduring appeal is clear, said Jeremy Eichler, classical music critic for The Boston Globe, who is devoting his Radcliffe fellowship to two books on music and cultural memory.“It may seem remarkable that this massive acoustic orchestral work from the 19th century retains such charisma in the age of the earbud,” said Eichler, who hears the Ninth at least once a year, as part of the Boston Symphony Orchestra’s season-ending offering at Tanglewood.“But I’ve never been to a performance that doesn’t touch this collective nerve and uncork a visceral response in the audience,” he added. “At this point it’s impossible to say how much that’s a reaction to the music itself, or to the sense of symbolic meaning it’s accrued over time — the score’s uncanny way of drawing out people’s optimism and sense of hope for the world. But without a doubt, the piece electrifies the audience year after year after year.”last_img read more

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first_imgIf you’re familiar with DuPont State Recreational Forest, a Western North Carolina mecca for hikers, mountain bikers, and waterfall chasers, you may know that there is a 476-acre expanse of land in the heart of this public tract that has never been open to the public.Now, thanks to a grant from DuPont Corp. this land belongs to the state of North Carolina and could soon be added to the park that surrounds its boarders.According to State Rep. Chris Whitmire (R-Transylvania), the North Carolina Council of State voted to accept the land—known as the “DuPont Donut Hole” because of its central location in the forest—on Tuesday morning.“Persistence and follow-through are key to successfully accomplishing the most complex objectives, and this morning a major milestone in my three-and-a-half-year quest to unlock the DuPont Donut Hole and eventually bring jobs to the former DuPont industrial site came to fruition when the North Carolina Council of State voted to accept the 476-acre parcel from the DuPont Corp. as a gift to the state,” he wrote in a newsletter.Whitmire went on to say that after preforming environmental remediation on the the site—once the largest X-ray film production plant on the planet—the state will likely utilize the ‘Donut Hole’ for emergency responder training and as a parking area for the surrounding recreational forest, offering increased trail connectivity and easier access to DuPont’s famous waterfalls.Read more here.last_img read more

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first_imgBill Klewin retired from CUNA Mutual Group on Friday, January 9. Recently, Bill sat down with Frank Diekmann and elaborated on his 28 years with CUNA Mutual, most recently as our lending product compliance leader, on lending, compliance and what’s ahead.Here are the insights and knowledge that he’s shared from the perspective of his life’s work serving the credit union industry…Frank: Given the length of your career with CUNA Mutual, what strikes you most as you approach the last day on the job in contrast to what you encountered on your first day walking in the door?Klewin: The sophistication of the issues and the complexity of the credit union business is the greatest change. When I first started at CUNA Mutual, a large credit union was one greater than $10 million in assets. That meant that the kinds of products and services offered by credit unions weren’t anywhere near as diverse, sophisticated, or complicated as they are now. Few credit unions had first mortgage programs, and only a brave few had home equity lines of credit. Share drafts were relatively new products and still controversial in some leaders’ opinions. Most credit unions had only one or two branches and dealt with walk-in traffic, the phone, and the U.S. Postal Service as means of communications.From a consumer regulatory compliance standpoint, while the credit unions were subject to the rules, compliance was viewed in many circles as a nuisance. I remember one specific situation where a board actually voted that they didn’t need to comply with consumer regulations as they were “not necessary” to protect their members.Frank: You have held a number of roles while at CUNA Mutual, including some time in the Office of General Counsel. Can you speak to the issue of some of the risks or vulnerabilities that you have seen? continue reading » 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 25-year-old New York City police officer from Massapequa died Monday after authorities said he was shot in the head by an alleged gunman while patrolling Queens Village over the weekend.Demetrius Blackwell, 35, was initially charged with first-degree attempted murder, assault and criminal possession of a weapon. Those charges are likely to be upgraded after the officer, Brian Moore, who was admitted in critical condition at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, died, according to the NYPD.“Condolences to the family of PO Brian Moore who lost his life today. RIP to a true hero. We will never forget. #Hero,” tweeted the department’s 104th Precinct Monday afternoon.“The defendant is accused of firing a weapon at two officers without warning, one of whom was struck in the head,” Queens District Attorney Richard Brown said. “The defendant faces life in prison for his alleged actions.”Authorities said Officer Moore and his partner, Officer Erik Jansen, were in plain clothes and sitting inside an unmarked patrol car while assigned to the 105th Precinct anti-crime team when they saw Blackwell “adjusting an object in his waistband” at 6:15 p.m. Saturday, NYPD Commissioner William Bratton said.Officer Moore, who was driving, followed the suspect as he walked southbound on 212nd Street, and questioned Blackwell about his actions as he turned eastbound on 104th Road. Then the suspect allegedly fired two shots into the police car, striking Officer Moore in the head, police said.The suspect fled while Officer Jansen called for backup. Moore, who was on the force for five years, underwent emergency surgery and was in a medically-induced coma upon being hospitalized. Blackwell was apprehended 90 minutes later in the South Queens neighborhood about a mile from the Nassau County line. Police said that he had numerous prior convictions for violent felonies.Queens Judge Michael Yavinsky ordered Blackwell held without bail Sunday. Blackwell is due back in Queens court Friday. If convicted, he faces up to life in prison without the possibility of parole.last_img read more

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