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first_img RSF_en to go further IranMiddle East – North Africa Receive email alerts Organisation Help by sharing this information IranMiddle East – North Africa February 25, 2021 Find out more March 18, 2021 Find out more Call for Iranian New Year pardons for Iran’s 21 imprisoned journalists Campaignscenter_img News June 9, 2021 Find out more Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 On the eve of the first round of Iran’s presidential election tomorrow, Reporters Without Borders is launching a new ad campaign to denounce the unacceptable conditions in which this election is taking place, above all the government’s contempt for freedom of information. Essential for free and democratic elections, freedom of information is not respected in the Islamic Republic.Inspired by Obey posters and designed by the Publicis Belgium advertising agency, the “Yes We Can” campaign draws the general public’s attention to Iran’s appalling record on free speech and freedom of information under the Supreme Leader and President Ahmadinejad. And now censorship and repression are being stepped up yet again on the eve of the election.The human rights situation in Iran got much worse during Ahmadinejad’s two presidential terms. More than 200 newspapers have been closed during the past eights years, while more than 300 journalists and netizens have been arbitrarily arrested, tortured and given long jail sentences. A total of 54 Iranian journalists and netizens are currently detained for trying to provide their fellow citizens with news and information. After Hengameh Shahidi’s pardon, RSF asks Supreme Leader to free all imprisoned journalists Follow the news on Iran News News June 13, 2013 – Updated on January 20, 2016 No free elections without freedom of informationlast_img read more

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first_img José Noel Canales Lagos, a 34-year-old journalist who had worked for the Hondudiario news website for the past 12 years, was gunned down in the capital on 10 August, bringing the number of journalists killed in the past decade to 30 (25 of them since the June 2009 coup). Help by sharing this information May 13, 2021 Find out more Organisation RSF_en December 28, 2020 Find out more Receive email alerts August 16, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Another journalist slain, special mechanism for protecting journalists announced RSF begins research into mechanisms for protecting journalists in Latin America This latest tragedy took place during a visit to Honduras by the UN special rapporteur for freedom of expression, Frank La Rue, from 7 to 14 August, as a result of which the government announced on 9 August that it would create a special entity for protecting journalists and solving the many murders of journalists in recent years.”Even if this announcement expresses a real political determination, it nonetheless follows years of impunity and lack of action that have been largely responsible for the scale of the death toll,” Reporters Without Borders said. “The government’s plan refers to the mechanisms for protecting journalists in Colombia but we are inevitably reminded of the Special Prosecutor’s Office for Crimes against Freedom of Expression created in Mexico in 2006, which fell very far short of producing the desired results. The Mexican precedent showed that creating a special entity is less important that setting it concrete objectives and giving it the resources required to combat impunity.”Like their Mexican colleagues, Honduran journalists – along with human rights workers, civil society representatives, lawyers and academics who provide information – will not break free of the spiral of violent crime and censorship until the way the police and judicial apparatus functions is completely overhauled.”Will this new entity be finally capable of implementing the protective measures that the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights requested for several journalists? Will it be free to resume all the investigations that were botched or shelved? Will it be able to take account of all the violence generated by the 2009 coup and its impact on human rights and freedom of information?” Reporters Without Borders added: “We should be wary of measures that are announced for effect when what the authorities could and should be doing is apply the law in the Canales case as it should have done in all the preceding cases.” Canales was driving to work when armed individuals aboard a taxi opened fire, hitting him in the head. The motive is not yet known. While stopping short of suggesting that the motive was linked to his work, Hondudiario noted in a tribute to Canales that he had often been threatened since 2009. HondurasAmericas Follow the news on Honduras News April 27, 2021 Find out more News 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies RSF’s 2020 Round-up: 50 journalists killed, two-thirds in countries “at peace” to go further HondurasAmericas News Reportslast_img read more

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first_img LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week Pinterest News Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Irish football fans who are keen to see the Euro 2012 games next year – will now have the option of a one day return flight through Ryanair.The airline announced today it will fly for the Croatia game on June 10th, the game against Spain on the 14th of June, and against Italy on the 18th.However, Irish fans may have a challenge on their hands when it comes to landing tickets for the matches in Poland.But Ryanair Chief Executive is confident that the Irish fans never have a problem locating tickets:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/17olea1.mp3[/podcast] Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH WhatsApp Ryanair to run one day return flights to Poland for Euro 2012center_img Pinterest Facebook WhatsApp Twitter By News Highland – December 14, 2011 Previous articleDonegal drivers lackadaisical when it comes to car securityNext articleEircom to brief Letterkenny Council on future plans for the town in January News Highland Twitter Google+ Facebook Business Matters Ep 45 – Boyd Robinson, Annette Houston & Michael Margeylast_img read more

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first_img Google+ Pinterest Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Facebook Facebook Crash on outskirts of Letterkenny causing delays Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA There’s been a road traffic collision on the outskirts of Letterkenny this morning. The single vehicle crash happened on the Letterkenny to Newmills Road just past O’Donnell Park at around 7.30am.Emergency services are attending the scene.Motorists are being advised to expect delays and to approach the area with caution as the car is understood to be currently blocking the road on the Letterkenny inbound side. Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Twitter WhatsAppcenter_img By News Highland – September 26, 2019 Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens further Previous articleRenewed calls on Government to lift HSE recruitment banNext article27 people awaiting in-patient beds at LUH News Highland WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Homepage BannerNews Twitter Google+ Community Enhancement Programme open for applications last_img read more

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first_imgJuly 8, 2020 /Sports News – Local Utah State’s Savon Scarver Recognized by College Football America Yearbook FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailLOGAN, Utah – Utah State senior wide receiver/kick returner Savon Scarver was named to the 2020 College Football America (CFA) Yearbook Group of 5 Preseason Starting Lineup, CFA’s version of a Group of 5 conference All-America Team, it was announced by the organization on Wednesday.Scarver is one of six players from the Mountain West to be named to the list.A consensus All-American in 2018 – just the third Aggie to ever earn that distinction – Scarver earned first-team all-MW honors as a junior in 2019 after leading the conference and ranking second nationally in kickoff returns for touchdown with two. The native of Las Vegas, Nev., was also first in the MW and 11th in the nation in kickoff return yards as he returned 22 kickoffs for 613 yards (27.9 ypr).Scarver was named the MW Special Teams Player of the Week following his performance against Colorado State on Sept. 28, 2019, as he returned a kickoff 100 yards for a touchdown in the Aggies’ 34-24 win over the Rams. He had another 100-yard kickoff return for touchdown in USU’s 36-10 win against Nevada on Oct. 19, 2019.Scarver caught 24 passes for 271 yards on the season, including hauling in a career-high five receptions for a career-best 90 yards, in the Aggies’ 23-17 win at San Diego State on Sept. 21, 2019.The winner of the Johnny “The Jet” Award as the top return specialist in the nation during the 2018 campaign, Scarver has five kickoff returns for touchdowns in his career, which is tied for the ninth-most in NCAA history, and second-most in MW history. He holds the school record with five kickoff returns for touchdowns (100, 100, 100, 99, 96), and is also third all-time in school history with an average of 28.3 yards per kickoff return as he has returned 70 kickoffs for 1,980 yards.The honor is the second of the preseason for Scarver, who was named to the 2020 Athlon Sports Preseason all-MW first team earlier this summer.Utah State went 7-6 overall in 2019, including a 6-2 mark in the MW to finish third in the Mountain Division. It was just the 26th time in school history that USU has won at least seven games, while its six league wins are tied for the sixth-most in school history. USU also played in its 14th bowl game in school history in 2019, including its eighth in the past nine seasons.The Aggies are slated to open the 2020 campaign by hosting Washington State on Thursday, Sept. 3, on Merlin Olsen Field at Maverik Stadium.Fans can follow the Aggie football program at twitter.com/USUFootball or on Facebook at Utah State Football, as well as on Instagram at instagram.com/USUFootball. Aggie fans can also follow the Utah State athletic program at twitter.com/USUAthletics or on Facebook at Utah State University Athletics.About the 2020 College Football America YearbookThe FBS section of the 2020 College Football America Yearbook features 89 pages of content including: National FBS preview, Dream Team and Group of 5 Starting Lineup; Preview of each FBS conference; Capsules for every FBS team, including 2019 results and 2020 schedules; Color photos throughout, including photos of every FBS stadium.The College Football America 2020 Yearbook features more than 930 college football teams from the United States and Canada in more than 250 striking, full-color pages. That includes every team from the NCAA (FBS, FCS, Division II, and Division III), NAIA, NJCAA, CCCAA and U Sports (Canada). It also includes updates on club football, one-year postgraduate prep/sports academies, and Mexican college football, along with dozens of action shots and stadium photos taken by the CFA staff.2020 College Football America Group of 5 Starting LineupOffenseQB – Brady White, Memphis, Sr.RB – Jaret Patterson, Buffalo, Jr.RB – Brenden Knox, Marshall, Jr.WR – Austin Watkins Jr., UAB, Sr.WR – Damonte Coxie, Memphis, Sr.TE – Kylen Granson, SMU, Sr.OL – Teton Saltes, New Mexico, Sr.OL – Tommy Doyle, Miami (OH), Sr.OL – Cain Madden, Marshall, Sr.OL – Nolan Laufenberg, Air Force, Sr.C – Noah Hannon, Appalachian State, Sr.DefenseDL – Keion White, Old Dominion, Jr.DL – DeAngelo Malone, Western Kentucky, Sr.DL – Tarron Jackson, Coastal Carolina, Sr.DL – Dom Peterson, Nevada, Jr.LB – Jordan Smith, UAB, Jr.LB – Treshaun Hayward, Western Michigan, Sr.LB – Carlton Martial, Troy, Jr.DB – Corey Straughter, ULM, Sr.DB – Ja’Von Hicks, Cincinnati, Jr.DB – Amechi Uzodinma II, Ball State, Jr.DB – Shaun Jolly, Appalachian State, Jr.SpecialistsPK – Matthew Trickett, Kent State, Jr.P – Ryan Stonehouse, Colorado State, Sr.KR – Savon Scarver, Utah State, Sr.PR – Avery Williams, Boise State, Sr.AP – Kenneth Gainwell, Memphis, So. Robert Lovell Tags: College Football America Yearbook/Savon Scarver/Utah State Aggies Football Written bylast_img read more

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first_imgThe Harvard Club of Australia Foundation has announced fellowship awards to eight accomplished Harvard researchers intending collaborative scientific research in Australia during 2012, and to two Australian researchers headed to Harvard. The foundation’s grants assist with travel and living expenses, and take the form of donations to their host Australian institutions.Fellows from Harvard: Paul Allen, professor of anesthesia, Harvard Medical School (HMS), aims to identify new approaches to the treatment of steroid-resistant asthma and airway hyperreactivity. He will bring new technology for transgenic mouse models to the University of Newcastle and develop classroom demonstrations on developments of transgenics to study models of human disease. During his 10 weeks in Australia, Allen will continue collaborations with Cristobal dos Remedios at the University of Sydney and Paul Foster at the University of Newcastle.Laura K. Barger, instructor in medicine at HMS, associate physiologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and a founding member of the Harvard Work Hours, Health and Safety Group, will extend her research on the association between work hours, sleep deficiency, and motor vehicle crashes through collaborations with researchers at Monash University in Melbourne, Austin Hospital, and interstate universities. During two months in Australia, she will teach Monash students and lead a workshop on drowsy driving to develop a research strategy in this area, working with Shantha Rajaratnam and several others.Ron Kikinis is Robert Greenes Distinguished Director of Biomedical Informatics and professor of radiology at HMS. After presenting workshops in Melbourne, Sydney, and Brisbane and meeting with neurosurgeons and neuroradiologists there, Kikinis will work with Karol Miller at the Intelligent Systems for Medicine Laboratory and deliver a master class organized by the University of Western Australia’s Institute of Advanced Studies, as well as lead research seminars for staff and postgraduate students at the Faculty of Engineering, Computing & Mathematics, and Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences and to deliver a hands-on workshop on 3D Slicer for neurosurgeons and neuroradiologists at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital. He will spend nearly one month in Australia.Christopher P. Landrigan, director, Sleep & Patient Safety Program, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and associate professor of medicine and pediatrics, HMS, will spend two months in Australia. He will conduct a pilot patient safety surveillance study with Peter Cameron at Monash University in Melbourne, then visit Sydney Children’s Hospital to discuss patient safety with health services researchers, clinicians, and safety scientists. He will also visit Sydney University’s Centre for Integrated Research & Understanding of Sleep to speak with research groups about his previous work on resident clinicians’ sleep deprivation and medical errors; followed by work with the government’s Clinical Excellence Commission to collaborate on translating research initiatives into policy and practice.Soroosh Radfar, research fellow, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and HMS, conducts immune system research between is aimed at a little-studied white blood cell component — the regulatory thymus cell known as CD8 Treg — to define its potential contribution in regulating infectious disease. During Radfar’s nearly five months in Perth, he will exploit the recent identification of the inhibitory Ly49F receptor on CD8 Treg, coupled with another doctor’s research on the Ly49H receptor located on the killer cells that play a major role in the rejection of tumors and virus infections.Vicki Rosen, professor of developmental biology, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, will present lectures in two areas of research: the role of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in bone and joint development, and the use of BMPs in bone and joint repair and regeneration in the adult skeleton. Also she will host seminars with postgraduate students and fellows from the schools of Surgery and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Western Australia (with Jiake Xu), and in Sydney at various faculties of the University of Sydney (with Hala Zreiqat) and related institutions. She is to be a key speaker at Sydney University’s Tissue Engineering Symposium (SuTEN-August 2012).Rima E. Rudd, senior lecturer, Department of Society, Human Development & Health, Harvard School of Public Health, has been invited to the University of Adelaide on a visiting professorship to raise awareness in the area of health literacy, to facilitate discussions among researchers, to develop research proposals, and to provide opportunities for exploring efficacious change in practice and in policy. She will also visit and develop proposals in health literacy with others including the Royal Women’s Hospital, Melbourne, and the New South Wales Government’s Clinical Excellence Commission. Rudd expects to spend at least three months in Australia.Joao Seco, assistant professor of radiation oncology, HMS, will collaborate, initially for two months, with Andrew Fielding at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, on the development of Monte Carlo and optimization techniques for use in radiation therapy for lung cancer using arc beam delivery and multi-criteria optimization.Australian fellows visiting Harvard:Associate Professor Diane Fatkin, laboratory head, Sister Bernice Research Program in Inherited Heart Disease, Molecular Cardiology Division, Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute (VCCRI) in Sydney, will pay a six-month visit to the laboratory of Professors Christine and Jon Seidman at the HMS Department of Genetic Studies, where Fatkin aims to utilize next-generation sequencing technologies to identify genetic variants in a cohort of families with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and then to generate a cohort of genotyped family members for genotype-phenotype correlations and clinical trials in familial DCM. On her return to Australia, Fatkin will train Sydney lab staff and students in these new technologies. Studies will have direct benefits to the families that are being studied at VCCRI.Professor Paul S. Foster, Laureate Professor and director, Priority Research Centre for Asthma and Respiratory Disease, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, will work for four months at the laboratory of Professor Richard L. Stevens at HMS to identify the roles of certain mast cell proteins (mMCP-6) and ribonucleic acids (RNAs) in the control of antiviral immune responses and allergic inflammation of the airways. He will also test the hypotheses that the roles of MCs and their proteins in promoting protective or damaging host responses in the lung are governed by the nature of the inflammatory stimulus and the subsequent immunological milieu, and that mMCP-6-dependent responses in mice are controlled, in part, by specific RNAs.last_img read more

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first_imgMorning ExercisesTo accommodate the increasing number of people wishing to attend Harvard’s Commencement Exercises, the following guidelines are provided to facilitate admission into Tercentenary Theatre on Commencement Morning:Degree candidates will receive a limited number of tickets to Commencement. Their parents and guests must have tickets, which must be shown at the gates in order to enter Tercentenary Theatre. Seating capacity is limited; there is standing room on the Widener steps and at the rear and sides of the Theatre. For details, visit the Commencement office website.Note: A ticket allows admission, but does not guarantee a seat. Seats are on a first-come basis and cannot be reserved. The sale of Commencement tickets is prohibited.A very limited supply of tickets is available to alumni and alumnae on a first-come, first-served basis through the Harvard Alumni Association. Alumni/ae and guests may view the Morning Exercises over large-screen televisions in the Science Center and at most of the undergraduate Houses and graduate and professional schools. These locations provide ample seating, and tickets are notrequired.College Alumni/ae attending their 25th, 35th, and 50th reunions will receive tickets at their reunions.Afternoon ProgramThe Harvard Alumni Association’s annual meeting, which includes remarks by its president, Overseer and HAA election results, the presentation of the Harvard Medals, and remarks by President Drew Gilpin Faust and the Commencement Speaker, convenes in Tercentenary Theatre on Commencement afternoon. For tickets (which are required, but free) visit the HAA website or call 617.496.7001.last_img read more

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first_imgAnxious homeowners say Georgia is crawling with snakes this summer. But a University of Georgia wildlife expert says snake numbers are actually much lower in the summer than in the fall.”Snakes tend to mate during the spring or early summer,” said Jeff Jackson, an Extension Service wildlife specialist and a D.B. Warnell School of Forestry professor at UGA. “The young are born or hatched in late August, depending on the species.” “Looking at the food chain and daily survival from predators, we know there are fewer and fewer snakes each day until the annual arrival of new little snakes,” he said. Snakes reproduce only once a year, he said. Most species have a dozen to two dozen offspring. Some lay eggs, while others give birth to their young. Snake eggs are oval, white and rubbery, Jackson said. “The eggs look like lizard and some turtle eggs,” he said. “But the shells are stiffer.” Seeing more snakes during the summer doesn’t mean the population has exploded. “Georgia’s climate is such that you could find snakes year-round if you were an enthusiast,” he said. Most people fear snakes. “Our attitudes toward snakes, for the most part, come from the environments we were raised in,” said Jackson, who played with snakes and other wildlife as a child. “Some people think if they kill a snake, they’re somehow saving the world,” he said. “But this attitude is changing.” Jackson said people who are afraid of snakes usually grab the nearest weapon of destruction when they see one. “If you see a snake, you don’t need a weapon,” he said. “Just stay out of the snake’s way. Be defensive. And watch where you put your hands and feet when you’re outdoors.” He said some people try to find logical reasons to let snakes live. “People always ask ‘What good is it?’ about animals they don’t know or animals they fear,” he said. “They’re out there. They exist. We don’t go hunting for ‘good’ when we see a mockingbird.” Over his 22-year career in wildlife management, Jackson has answered thousands of snake-related phone calls. “People are always asking me what to do when they see a snake in their yard,” he said. “I tell them to do the same thing they do when they see a frog, a turtle or a bird. Do nothing.” Jackson says common sense comes into play when you find a venomous snake near your home. “Doing battle with the snake will put you at a greater risk than walking the other way. But that’s a judgement call,” he said. “A poisonous snake near your home can be an accident waiting to happen. And I’ll admit I’ve turned a few into natural history specimens for my classes.” Jackson suggested arming yourself with knowledge. “Most zoos and nature centers keep a display of local venomous snakes,” he said. “Take a visit with the kids and learn what these snakes look like. Knowledge is power. It’s that basic.” Jackson said relying on a formula (“triangular-headed snakes are poisonous”) can put people and snakes in danger. “If a snake has a triangular head, it has little or nothing to do with whether it’s venomous,” he said. “Plenty of harmless snakes have been killed because they have triangular heads. On the other hand, coral snakes don’t have triangular heads, and they’re highly venomous.” With modern medicine, the fatality rate for snakebites is low. “Of those bitten each year, 99 percent survive,” Jackson said. “Those are great odds. The same number of people are killed each year by uncontrolled pets as by snakebites. Yet dogs are considered man’s best friend.” Of the 39 snake species native to Georgia, he said, only six are venomous.last_img read more

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first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Atlanta Business Chronicle:Georgia Power Co. will continue reducing its reliance on coal during the next two decades while stepping up its investments in renewable power and energy efficiency, according to a plan the Atlanta-based utility submitted Thursday.The 2019 Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) would keep Georgia Power moving toward the goals the company committed to when it filed its last IRP with the state Public Service Commission (PSC) in 2016. Georgia Power is required to submit a report every three years outlining the mix of energy sources it plans to rely on to meet the needs of its 2.5 million customers for the next 20 years.Specifically, the company is asking to retire four coal-burning units at Plant Hammond near Rome, Ga., and to retire one coal unit at Plant McIntosh near Rincon, Ga, west of Savannah. Georgia Power also proposes not to renew the operating licenses of two hydropower projects on the Chattahoochee River in West Georgia, which would ultimately lead to the dams’ removal.While taking those power supply sources out of the mix, the utility is seeking to procure an additional 1,000 megawatts of energy from renewable sources. If approved, the additional renewable power would increase Georgia Power’s renewable portfolio to 18 percent. The IRP also proposes new energy-saving programs for residential and commercial customers aimed at reducing peak demand by about 1,600 megawatts.The plan would continue to emphasize a mixed array of energy sources, long a mantra with Georgia Power. That includes nuclear power, as the utility remains committed to completing a $27.3 billion nuclear expansion at Plant Vogtle despite soaring costs and scheduling delays.“We have invested in a diverse energy mix of nuclear, natural gas, hydro, renewables, coal and energy efficiency resources in order to maintain high levels of reliability for our customers that have resulted in rates that are 15 percent below the national average,” said Allen Reaves, senior vice president and senior production officer at Georgia Power.More: Georgia Power doubles down on renewable power, energy efficiency Georgia Power proposes closing Hammond, McIntosh coal plantslast_img read more

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Cash allegedly found at Huntington Station man’s apartment on Monday night.Federal agents executing a search warrant at a Huntington Station’s man apartment Monday night discovered more than 20 pounds of cocaine and $3 million in cash, authorities said Tuesday.The man who lived there, Adrian Bonilla, was placed under arrest during a traffic stop and was charged with intent to distribute.During the search of Bonilla’s Shelley Place apartment, Drug Enforcement Administration agents allegedly recovered “numerous plastic bags from various areas of the apartment containing cocaine, one plastic bag containing a small amount of cocaine base, packaging materials and two digital scales,” according to court documents, which also stated that contents in one of the plastic bags allegedly tested positive for cocaine.Authorities noted that agents discovered $3 million in cash hidden away in newly installed sheet rock.Bonilla was arrested about an hour before authorities searched his apartment.The 34-year-old was pulled over for a traffic stop by a New York State police officer and 100 grams of “a substance believed to be cocaine” was allegedly found in his pocket, according to court documents.A judge ordered Bonilla to be held without bail at his arraignment in Central Islip on Tuesday.Bonilla’s attorney could not be reached for comment.last_img read more

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