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whatsapp Chinese make a bid for Kalahari Tuesday 8 March 2011 9:21 pm KCS-content by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesBrake For ItThe Most Worthless Cars Ever MadeBrake For ItBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeAlphaCute30 Rules That All “Hells Angels” Have To FollowAlphaCuteDefinitionDesi Arnaz Kept This Hidden Throughout The Filming of ‘I Love Lucy’DefinitionTaonga: The Island FarmThe Most Relaxing Farm Game of 2021. No InstallTaonga: The Island FarmZen HeraldNASA’s Voyager 2 Has Entered Deep Space – And It Brought Scientists To Their KneesZen Herald A $1.23bn (£761m) potential takeover offer by a Chinese state-run group for Kalahari Minerals may prompt Rio Tinto to consider its own bid for the uranium miner. The 290p per share offer by China Guangdong Nuclear Power Holding would allow China’s government access to uranium to boost its atomic generation efforts. Rio Tinto owns 14 per cent of Kalahari and has indicated an interest in buying smaller miners, raising the prospect that it could consider a takeover. Japan’s Itochu Corp also owns 14 per cent of Kalahari. whatsapp Show Comments ▼ Tags: NULL Share More From Our Partners Police Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgSidney Crosby, Alex Ovechkin are graying and frayingnypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.com read more

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first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Hurricane Sandy AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Dec 11, 2012 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Jersey Episcopalians still countering Sandy’s wrath In it for the long haul, congregations look to next recovery steps Press Release Service Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN center_img Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Tags In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Jane Forno, a volunteer from Westfield, New Jersey, and Bob Dispoto, one of the “Basement Boys” for St. Gregory’s Pantry at St. Mary’s by-the-Sea Episcopal Church in Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey, recently spent the day sorting food donations. ENS photo/Mary Frances Schjonberg[Episcopal News Service] While Hurricane Sandy dealt a devastating blow to homes, businesses and church buildings six weeks ago on the night of Oct. 29, Episcopal Church congregations along the New Jersey Shore have been determined since the first hours after the storm to care for their communities and help them rebuild.They are doing so, in many cases, with help from congregations farther west in the diocese where the damage from Sandy was less severe. And many churches are working in their communities through already-established or new, post-Sandy ecumenical ties.In Point Pleasant Beach, for instance, the Roman Catholic parish became a center for clothing distribution when its priest suggested to the Rev. C. John Thompson-Quartey, rector of St. Mary’s by the Sea Episcopal Church, that division of duties. St. Mary’s is already known in the community for the St. Gregory’s Pantry, which operates out of the church. Point Pleasant Presbyterian has become the coordination point for work teams coming into town to help with long-term recovery.A statue of Jesus appears to be keeping watch over donated food in the boiler room of St. Mary’s by-the-Sea Episcopal Church in Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey. ENS photo/Mary Frances Schjonberg“Each church finds [itself] doing something unique and different that they didn’t anticipate prior,” said Thompson-Quartey, who said he told a recent meeting of the local ministerium that “sometimes God throws us a curve ball and creates opportunities for ministry in the midst of that.”All ministerium members agreed, he said, that “they displayed skills they didn’t think they had. One person said, ‘I’m now an expert on mold. If you ever want to talk about mold and drying, I’m your guy.’”“St. Mary’s turned out to be the feeding place,” Thompson-Quartey said. “We feed people.”Since Sandy, the congregations and the Diocese of New Jersey to which they belong have been  “creating linkages, making connections, that’s our job and that’s what we’re attempting to do by the grace that God gives us,” Bishop George Councell said in a recent video message.The stories of those links and connections are almost as numerous as the 154 congregations that make up the diocese. The diocese has 17 official resource centers, shown here, as well as any number of other churches where community residents came to donate or to get help. Stories of some of that ministry are here.And in some instances, the congregation’s ministry has changed in the six weeks since Sandy hit. Now at Christ Episcopal Church in Toms River, a township of about 91,000 people that lost 20 percent of its taxable base in the storm, there is a Sunday afternoon support group for any adult who needs a place for “reflecting and processing the emotional and/or spiritual feelings you’ve experienced in the weeks since Sandy struck.”The township encompasses both mainland areas and parts of the Barnegat Peninsula that acts as a barrier island between the Atlantic and Barnegat Bay. In the days immediately after the storm struck, the needs were basic.“First of all, let us know you are OK. We are praying for you and need to know you are alive,” the parish asked its members Nov. 2 on its Facebook page. “Secondly, are you displaced? Water in your home? Car submerged? Belongings destroyed? Hungry? Cold?” The posting urged members to get in touch with Christ Church’s rector, the Rev. Joan Pettit Mason.Among Toms River residents’ first tasks after the hurricane was mucking out their flooded or destroyed homes, and Christ Church became a place for the donation and distribution of cleaning supplies. On Nov. 7 Pettit Mason again turned to Facebook, posting a plea for a truck or trucks to collect 1,000 free “mold-out” bucket kits from the Bronx and bring them about 85 miles south to the church.When Phyllis Jones, Diocese of New Jersey’s chief financial officer and a member of St. Martin’s Episcopal Church in Bridgewater, learned of the truck plea, she said she turned to fellow parishioner Chuck Inman who works as the fulfillment manager for the Metropolitan Museum of Arts’ retail operation. She knew he had access to trucks and suspected he’d be inspired by the need. He was, she said, and managed to get all 1,000 kits to Christ Church where a bucket brigade of parishioners, Boy Scouts and other volunteers unloaded them all into the church.It was a good example, Jones said, of how churches are often the places that step in, “picking up the things that fall through the cracks of the major recovery efforts.”For many churches on the Jersey Shore and even farther inland, ministry began in an unplanned way: out of a desire not to have perishable food go to waste after Sandy’s fury knocked out power for what turned out to be weeks in some cases. St. Mary’s in Point Pleasant Beach and St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Keansburg are but two examples. A video report on St. Mark’s efforts is here.The morning after the storm in Point Pleasant, Thompson-Quartey was surveying the church and rectory for damage (it was minimal) when he saw people carrying food to the nearby Fire Department to feed first responders. When he asked if they might need more, Thompson-Quartey said he got a hearty “Yes.”One of the leaders of the pantry managed to call him despite the power outages to tell him to “let the food go to anyone who can use it.” Thompson-Quartey said two men came with a large truck and worked by flashlight in the basement unloading thawing food from the pantry’s five freezers for use at the Fire Department and at the shelter at the borough high school.Meanwhile, neighbors and local businesses began bringing donations to the church. The parish’s pre-Sandy plan to begin a Thursday night weekly community meal called “Mary’s Table” on Nov. 1 was somewhat in question. Until, that is, Laurie Clayton, the leader of the first meal’s team, called to say that it was three days after the storm and some people had not had a hot meal since.When Thompson-Quartey noted the lack of electricity, Clayton said she replied, “They’re either going to be sitting at home in the dark or sitting here in the dark with company.”The team began cooking while it was still light, firing up the kitchen’s gas stove. Clayton’s husband ran an inverter from his car so that they could hang some work lights in the kitchen for when it got dark. Mike Mercuio, a local real estate agent who trained in the Army as a cook, was the chef. Jersey Mike’s sub shop brought over salad and rolls when they heard St. Mary’s was serving and Joe Leone’s, a local caterer, brought 15 trays of pastas, according to Thompson-Quartey.Clayton worried that some people might not know about the meal that first night. “We realized that we needed to get food to people where they were,” she said.She rounded up some volunteer drivers and the team filled take-out containers that had been bought as part of the weekly meal’s supplies.“We told our drivers to go east of the railroad tracks, go to the lakes, go to the ocean,” she said. “We knew people there were cold and wet.”About 100 people came to eat and between 300-400 meals were delivered at the height of what turned out to be a daily meal for the next month.And food for the meals just kept appearing. After the first three or four nights, Clayton said she and the others realized that pasta and sauce were wearing thin, and they wished aloud for some meat. Minutes later, a refrigerated truck from a Salem County in southwest New Jersey, showed up, its driver asking if they could use any ham, roast beef or ground meat.The need for a daily meal began to decline about a month after Sandy and Mary’s Table is now being set once a week at St. Mary’s. Clayton wants to continue to publicize the meal to folks still living in local motels and the ones still living in the homes, perhaps on the upper floors after Sandy demolished the interior of their ground floors.Meanwhile, the pantry (a separate organization to which the parish gives space) returned to its regular schedule of being open for two hours every weekday after a month of being open seven days a week until 5 p.m. Sue Dietz, one of the pantry’s four directors, said she has been overwhelmed by “the volunteers, the need, the generosity, the devastation, the heartbreak.”People knew to come to St. Gregory’s after the storm, Dietz said, and they did, and they needed everything: food, cleaning supplies, toiletries, blankets. And others knew that the pantry would need those things. “An avalanche” of donations rolled into the church and the pantry, Thompson-Quartey said.Dietz said some of the donations had to be turned down. For instance, she refused donations of used bedding. “Their hearts were in the right place,” she said of the donors, but the pantry operators were worried about health concerns and thought that “because you’re displaced doesn’t mean you don’t deserve to have something new.”It was one of the many lessons they have learned, Dietz said. “You have to learn as you go; you had to think on your feet and sometimes you have to change your mind,” she said.The pantry and the church also gave supplies to other churches and organizations. And they are now turning away donations until their inventory is depleted. That inventory is stored all over the building as well as in donated space off-site.The leadership for these sorts of ministry at St. Mary’s came from the congregation, said Thompson-Quartey. “When I found myself trying to lead from the front, I got sick,” said the rector, who spent two days in the hospital being treated for high blood pressure he did not know he had.When he returned, he said, Clayton told him what they need from him was “your approval of things we think need to happen and we’ll do it.”Diocesan CFO Jones said she has been moved by these kinds of stories of ministry as she has traveled around the diocese since Sandy and helped connect resources to needs. Time and again, she said, she has been given “a whole new perspective of what ‘in it for the long term’ really means.”Jones said that Episcopal Relief & Development and Church Insurance have both helped the diocese and its congregations meet immediate needs and plan for the long haul that faces the diocese and the state. “I can’t say enough about them,” she said. Members of Episcopal Relief & Development’s U.S. Disaster Program and Partners in Response team have come to the diocese more than once since Sandy.She suggested that local Episcopal congregations “can probably play a unique kind of role” in the long-term recovery effort by offering people all types of support and organizing advocacy efforts for hard-hit communities. Jones sees that role as suited to the congregation because the churches are rooted in those communities and will be there long after the immediate crisis is over and the media have turned elsewhere.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab last_img read more

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first_img  18 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Charity Commission hunts out dormant charity bank accounts If it finds any such dormant accounts, it reserves the right to transfer the funds to other charities with similar objects for application towards charitable activities.So far it appears the Commission has found only one account which it proposes to transfer, namely that of the North Tees Scanner Appeal. Howard Lake | 10 October 2002 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The Commission has started a project to trace and identify charity funds in dormant bank and building society accounts, using their powers in section 28 of the Charities Act 1993.The Commission is working with financial institutions and aims to identify any unused charitable resources which can be recovered and reapplied for other charitable purposes. It explains that this task is in line with its statutory duty of promoting the effective use of charitable resources. Section 28 of the Charities Act 1993 encourages banks, building societies, deposit-takers, etc. voluntarily to inform the Charity Commission of dormant accounts without breaching client confidentiality. Once informed, the Commission, after making “reasonable (but unsuccessful) enquiries to locate any of the charity trustees”, can find “proper outlets for applying the money (which would otherwise continue to remain in a dormant account achieving no effective benefit) towards charitable purposes.” Advertisementlast_img read more

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first_imgPublicado en pagina12.com.ar el 1 de septiembre de 2019.La relación entre el gobierno de Venezuela y el de Colombia ha dado nuevos pasos de enfrentamiento esta semana. La primera acusación vino por parte de Iván Duque luego del anuncio del regreso a las armas por parte de un sector de las FARC. El presidente afirmó que el grupo, a quien calificó “banda de narcoterroristas”, cuenta “con el albergue y el apoyo de la dictadura de Nicolás Maduro”.En respuesta a las acusaciones del presidente, el gobierno venezolano emitió un comunicado para rechazar de los señalamientos. “Resulta insólito que Iván Duque, con absoluta desfachatez, pretenda desplazar hacia terceros países y terceras personas, su exclusiva responsabilidad en el planificado desmontaje del proceso de paz y el cumplimiento de los compromisos asumidos y firmados por el Estado colombiano.”No es la primera vez que el gobierno colombiano acusa al de Venezuela de dejar operar a las fuerzas insurgentes en su territorio, en particular al ELN. A esa matriz se había sumado el señalamiento de que Iván Márquez y Jesús Santrich -presentes en el centro del video difundido para anunciar el regreso a las armas- estaban en el vecino país.El ministro de defensa de Venezuela, Vladimir Padrino López, denunció intenciones de guerra detrás de las acusaciones de Iván Duque: “El problema político que enfrenta Colombia, no puede ni debe derivar en una confrontación militar. Exhortamos a no buscar excusas ni pretextos con falsos positivos para intentar violar nuestra soberanía territorial, bien sea por fuerzas convencionales como por grupos irregulares”.En ese contexto, el día sábado, el ministro de comunicación venezolano, Jorge Rodríguez, denunció el funcionamiento de tres campamentos de preparación armada en Colombia, donde se preparan las acciones terroristas contra el gobierno y la sociedad venezolana.Afirmó que uno se sitúa en la ciudad de Maicao, a 2,5 kilómetros de la frontera, otro en Río Acha, y el tercero en la Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta. Los dos primeros son, explicó, de entrenamiento para uso de explosivos, y el tercero de entrenamiento militar. Allí se “entrenan más de 200 personas para acciones paramilitares, terroristas, asesinatos selectivos, y agresión en la frontera”, denunció Jorge Rodríguez.“¿Qué vas a hacer Iván Duque?” afirmó el ministro de comunicación al exhortar al presidente de Colombia a que desmonte los centros de entrenamiento de los cual, explicó, es cómplice.Rodríguez explicó que los servicios venezolanos lograron confirmar la existencia de los centros luego de desarticular tres acciones con explosivo. Las dos primeras iban a ocurrir el 17 de agosto, al detonar explosivos cargados de C4 frente la sede de las Fuerzas de Acciones Especiales y un edificio del barrio 23 de Enero, bastión chavista. El tercero iba a darse a finales de agosto, con la detonación de un explosivo en el Palacio de Justicia de Caracas, situado en una de las zonas más transitadas del centro de la ciudad.“Todo esto forma parte de un plan que tenía su culminación en los próximos quince, pensaban perpetrar acciones de mayor magnitud en contra del pueblo de Venezuela y el presidente de la república”, detalló Jorge Rodríguez.Las acusaciones cruzadas regresan así a su punto de mayor tensión desde el 23 de febrero, cuando el gobierno colombiano abrió dos puentes internacionales para intentar ingresar camiones y manifestantes por la fuerza en territorio venezolano. La noche siguiente había tenido lugar un ataque de un grupo de 60 paramilitares a un puesto de la Guardia Nacional Bolivariana a pocos kilómetros del puente internacional.No es la primera vez que el gobierno venezolano acusa al de Colombia de ser parte activa en los intentos de derrocamiento de Nicolás Maduro. En agosto del 2018, Venezuela señaló que los autores del intento de asesinato del presidente se habían entrando en un campamento en Colombia, más exactamente en Chinácota. Desde allí también habrían traído los drones que cargaron los explosivos para realizar la acción.La escalada ocurre en un momento de crisis de la oposición venezolana, que ha perdido su capacidad de movilización y de generar expectativa. Sus iniciativas se redujeron en las últimas semanas, al igual que su impacto mediático tanto nacional como internacional.El escenario internacional tuvo en contrapartida dos noticias centrales. La primera, de orden similar al que enfrentan Cuba, Irán, Siria y Corea del Norte. La segunda, política, con el reconocimiento de la existencia de diálogos directamente entre el gobierno norteamericano y el venezolano.Esto último se dio luego de que Maduro decidiera retirarse de la mesa de diálogo con la oposición en Barbados, debido al nuevo paso de acciones unilaterales de Estados Unidos. La confirmación de canales de diálogo entre ambos gobiernos evidenció que la resolución del conflicto pasa por un acuerdo con el gobierno norteamericano, real decisor, financista y articulador del intento de derrocamiento de Maduro.La posibilidad de ese acuerdo todavía aparece lejana en un juego trancado. EE.UU. afirma que no está dispuesto a una negociación que no implique la salida del presidente venezolano antes mismo de unas elecciones. En cuanto al gobierno de Maduro, una de las exigencias es el retiro del bloqueo contra el país.¿Cómo operará la nueva escalada entre Venezuela y Colombia en este contexto? El gobierno venezolano ha denunciado en varias oportunidades los laberintos de guerra que se preparan desde el país vecino. La vicepresidenta, Delcy Rodríguez, anunció que presentará pruebas en Naciones Unidas sobre “la protección y amparo de Iván Duque a grupos terroristas y armados en Colombia para, con su anuencia, atentar contra nuestro orden constitucional”. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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first_imgThe task force report recommends some serious changes to the system of providing conservation services. In short, it says the current system of county soil and water districts is obsolete and inefficient. The report suggests districts be combined into regional organizations organized around individual watersheds. These multi-county districts would pool resources, staff, and funding to address conservation for an entire watershed system. Conservationists say this approach would be more effective and allow for a greater degree of actual conservation to be put on the land. Facebook Twitter SHARE Yet, this type of change will not be easy. The county level SWCD system has been in place for more than 70 years.  County committees are well-established; politically powerful; and, in some areas, enjoy a good deal of public support. SWCD employees are naturally skeptical, fearing that this level of reorganization would threaten their jobs. These are all legitimate concerns of which state leaders are aware.  The fact remains, however, that change must occur. Similar changes are being made in other states including Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Washington. Almost all the people involved in conservation that I have had the pleasure to know have had one thing in common: a passion for the land and for protecting and preserving it. While the changes that will need to be made will not be easy, in the end, I suspect most people who are truly committed to preserving the land will adapt and adopt a new system that meets the new realities.  Just as no one wants to go back to the days of the privy, no one wants to go back to the days of no funding or technical assistance for preserving our oil and keeping our water supply clean and safe.  The accomplishments of the conservation movement in this nation are truly outstanding, but without change this progress may be lost.  Conservation work has been accomplished by those on the local level, and it is here that a dialogue about the future must begin. The transition from privy to indoor plumbing took decades, but was accomplished with very little social upheaval.  There is little evidence that people organized to resist the new technology.  There was not a HPO formed, (Hoosiers for the Preservation of Outhouses). I hope the transition of the system that delivers conservation will go as smoothly and not take decades to accomplish. By Gary Truitt – Aug 26, 2012 SHARE Privies and Watersheds A special task force recently released a report on the future of conservation in Indiana. The picture it painted is a sobering one and clearly lays out some of the challenges that efforts to protect our soil, water, and environment face.  At the heart of the matter is money. Despite all the attention environmental issues get, funds to really put conservation on the land are declining at the local, state, and federal levels.  Faced with tighter budgets, local governments are finding it hard to continue to fund county SWCDs.  In Indiana, state funding for conservation comes from the cigarette tax; and, with fewer people smoking, tax revenues have been declining. In Washington, funding for conservation is being plundered by a variety of other programs. The current emergency drought aid legislation gets its funding by gutting several conservation programs. Facebook Twitter Home Commentary Privies and Watersheds By Gary Truitt Change in inevitable, but change is not always easy. Yet it is surprising how quickly and easily we can change when a truly better way of doing something comes along. Take, for example, the privy. Our Hoosier ancestors started building outhouses because it was safer and slightly more private than squatting in the woods. The first patent for the flushing toilet was issued to Alexander Cummings in 1775, but it took another 150 years before the flush toilet and indoor plumbing became common. In some rural areas, it took even longer for the privy to come a relic of a bygone era. Other changes have not come so easily. Take, for example, time and class basketball. In Indiana, we are still arguing about what time it should be; and just mention class basketball to a Hoosier and you will instantly start an argument.  There is change coming to the Indiana soil and water conservation community, and it remains to be seen if the change will go the way of the privy or daylight savings time. Previous articleDrought Impacts Seed Selection for 2013Next article2012 Economics Say Get Grain to the Elevator Gary Truittlast_img read more

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first_img Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Book Nook to reopen Tumbling down: Dorm demo begins By Jaine Treadwell Published 10:20 pm Tuesday, May 20, 2014 Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel By The Penny Hoarder Skip Email the authorcenter_img Latest Stories Print Article Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… You Might Like Special Olympians make the most of summer games For the eighth year in a row, Troy University held the state’s Special Olympics summer games. This year’s games included… read more Sponsored Content Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Demolition of Troy University’s Alumni Hall began this week. It will be replaced with a dormitory that will house 428 students.Messenger Photo/Jaine TreadwellThe end of an era.Audiences gathered at several locations on the Troy University campus Friday afternoon to watch as the demolition of the Alumni Hall began. However, the aging men’s dormitory didn’t give way easily and took punch after punch on the chin.Greg Price, Troy University’s chief technology officer, laughingly said taking down Alumni Hall is not a challenge he would want to face.“It’s not going without resistance,” he said.Price explained that the demolition process includes a constant spray of water to keep the dust down.The area surrounding Alumni Hall has been closed and is being closely monitored to prevent unauthorized entrance into the work area.The demolition of Alumni Hall, which was built in 1966, will make way for a new state-of-the-art facility that will house 428 students. The new facility will have 280 single-bed suites, 68 double occupancy suites and 12 handicapped suites. The entire project is estimated to cost $15.6 million, including $500 000 in technology.“Our new Alumni Hall will be equipped with the very latest in high-technology amenities that can be used for both academic study and recreation,” said Dr. Jack Hawkins Jr., chancellor. “We will never build another traditional-style dormitory at Troy University because we have learned that our students respond to residence halls that could be more accurately called ‘learning communities’.”In addition to the residential rooms, Alumni Hall includes 1,400 square feet of common areas, 2,600 square feet of safe space that doubles as class and meeting rooms, a convenience store, technology areas, laundry areas and study rooms.The new men’s residential facility is scheduled for completion by August 2015. Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kitslast_img read more

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first_imgiStock/Ahmed Zaggoudi(JEFFERSON CITY, Missouri) — BY: ELLA TORRES, ABC NewsMissouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt has filed a lawsuit against the Chinese government for allegedly running an “appalling campaign of deceit, concealment, misfeasance, and inaction” amid the novel coronavirus outbreak.The lawsuit, filed Tuesday in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern State of Missouri, alleges that the People’s Republic of China, the Communist Party of China and other governing bodies in the country misrepresented and concealed the seriousness of the outbreak from the rest of the world during the period of December 2019 through January 2020. “During the critical weeks of the initial outbreak, Chinese authorities deceived the public, suppressed crucial information, arrested whistleblowers, denied human-to-human transmission in the face of mounting evidence, destroyed critical medical research, permitted millions of people to be exposed to the virus, and even hoarded personal protective equipment — thus causing a global pandemic that was unnecessary and preventable,” according to a copy of the lawsuit.The Chinese government has not yet responded to the lawsuit. However, the government did deny a story from The Associated Press, which claimed that officials there did not warn the public of the pandemic for six key days, and said that the government immediately reported the outbreak to the World Health Organization.“Those accusing China of lacking transparency and openness are unfair,” foreign ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian told the Associated Press when asked about the AP story. The National Health Commission, which is named in the Missouri lawsuit as a defendant, also told the Associated Press that China published information on the outbreak in an “open, transparent, responsible and timely manner” and in accordance with “important instructions” issued by President Xi Jinping.The coronavirus epidemic started in Wuhan, China, though the exact date of when the first case was detected is not exactly clear. While some records indicate the first case occurred in December, ABC News learned that U.S. intelligence officials were warned of a contagion sweeping through the Wuhan region as far back as late November, according to four sources briefed on the secret reporting.Yet the virus has since spread to every continent in the world except Antarctica. There are at least 2.5 million confirmed cases of the coronavirus, or COVID-19, across the globe and at least 171,000 deaths, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.In Missouri, there are at least 5,807 confirmed cases and 177 deaths, according to the state’s Department of Health and Senior Services.Schmitt is seeking the recovery for “the enormous loss of life, human suffering, and economic turmoil experienced by all.”Under the pandemic, the majority of the states in the U.S., including Missouri, have adopted some form of a lockdown, meaning citizens are not meant to leave their homes except for essential needs.Unlike some other states, Missouri Gov. Mike Parson has allowed nonessential businesses to stay open so long as they comply with the social distancing requirements, which mandates that no more than 10 individuals can occupy a single space.“The COVID-19 outbreak has caused hardship in Missouri and across the globe — death, isolation from sick and dying loved ones, massive unemployment, economic dislocation, uncertainty, and trillions of dollars of economic losses,” according to a statement from Schmitt’s office. “China should be held legally responsible.”Schmitt’s office also outlined what they described as key factual allegations. Those allegations include the Chinese government denying the risk of human-to-human transmission, silencing whistleblowers, failing to contain the outbreak, and hoarding personal protective equipment. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Self-help books often do more harm than good. Released by the thousand every year, they tend to bury useful information beneath reams of unlikely anecdotes or quasi-spiritual nonsense. They can be expensive too, in terms of both money and time. Most people seek help when they need it urgently. The last thing anyone needs is a pile of turgid reading matter clogging up their in-tray.Thankfully, a few books exist that can genuinely improve the personal skills, working relationships and general well-being of any reader. They are aimed not at specific disciplines, such as personnel management, but at the generic issues faced by most workers, regardless of rank or role. You may, therefore, find it helpful to keep a few copies of each in your office, to refresh your own skills and complement your advice to others. Better still, you could encourage your board to distribute them widely, to prevent problems across the organisation.The recommended reading list below is by no means exhaustive, but each book represents a good return on investment as they are all accessible, concise and practical. The list covers a range of skills and solutions that should boost the productivity of any workplace.Read faster, read betterHow To Be A Rapid Reader: Six steps to increased speed and concentration, by Kathryn Redway (National Textbook Company, ISBN: 0844229431, £4.99 from Amazon.co.uk).Imagine all the printed material that crosses your desk each day. Now imagine racing through it, twice as fast as usual. Impossible? Not at all. In fact, the skill of speed-reading can be learned and applied in just a few hours. And far from forcing you to skip information, it will actually help you to retain even more.Kathryn Redway’s brilliant tutorial is 119 pages long and can be read in an afternoon. Indeed, you will probably finish it much sooner, as your reading picks up speed. The book aims to rid you of childhood reading habits, such as subvocalisation (reading words aloud in your head), and to replace them with new ones, such as using your peripheral vision to read several words at a glance.It includes dedicated chapters on how to speed-read complex material such as business reports, legal texts and periodicals. So it should prove useful to workers in any sector. In organisations that depend on the ability of their staff to read and retain new information, it will boost productivity at a stroke.How to get things doneThe Now Habit: A strategic programme for overcoming procrastination and enjoying guilt-free play, by Neil A Fiore (Penguin Putnam, ISBN: 0874775043, £6.57 from Amazon.co.uk).You could be forgiven for thinking this book was the business equivalent of a rigorous diet plan. In fact, it is easy to read, quick to finish (at about 200 pages) and immediately useful. It aims to help the reader overcome procrastination – the tendency to put off tasks – which for many people creates poor work-life balance.“The typical procrastinator completes most assignments on time,” says author Neil Fiore, “but the pressure of doing work at the last minute causes unnecessary anxiety and diminishes the quality of the end result.” He points out that most of us motivate ourselves with sticks rather than carrots. In contrast, his programme encourages you to build your schedule around a rewarding social life.Fiore avoids self-help platitudes such as “set priorities” because, he says, you would do these things if you could. Instead, he offers practical advice on dealing with underlying issues such as fear of failure, perfectionism and indecisiveness. He also explains how to deal with procrastinating colleagues.Avoid information fatigueInformation Overload: Practical strategies for surviving in today’s workplace, by David Lewis (Penguin, ISBN: 0140274650, around £5 from Amazon.co.uk). It’s easy to get deluged by data. Some is essential, but most is superfluous, and by trying to absorb too much of it we can enter a state of “analysis paralysis” and, in extreme cases, make ourselves ill.This book is designed to help you sort the wheat from the chaff. It does so by going back to basics and examining the way people learn new concepts, memorise them and apply them to decisions or solutions. This may sound woolly, but it will make an immediate difference to your working life.Among other things it reveals: why the “step by step” approach to learning taken by schools can hinder development in adults; how to apply information quickly no matter how much you have to consider; and advanced techniques to improve your speed-reading and memory.Information Overload was published in 1999 and is now out of print, but it remains unrivalled for the breadth, brevity and practicality of its advice. Secondhand copies are available for about 5. Alternatively, you could hire its author David Lewis – the man who coined the term “information fatigue syndrome” – by checking out his profile at www.absolute-speakers.co.ukDeal with difficult managersHow To Manage Your Boss: Developing the perfect working relationship, by Ros Jay (Prentice Hall, ISBN: 0273659316, around £13 from most bookshops).Anyone who has to deal with a problematic boss will benefit from this book, provided, of course, that they read it at home rather than at the office (this is definitely one to recommend rather than distribute).Ros Jay explains how to deal effectively with characters ranging from bullies and control freaks to bosses who take credit for your ideas. She suggests ways to neutralise, or overcome, irritating and stress-inducing problems such as the boss who won’t listen, constant interruptions and having to answer to two bosses at the same time.One of the book’s most interesting recommendations is to get to know your boss’s boss. By doing so, you’ll have a better understanding of what motivates your boss, what puts them under pressure and where their worst habits originated. Overall, the aim is to get your boss to “look up with pleasure when you walk into the room” and to bear you in mind for pay rises and promotions.If a member of your staff comes to you with a minor, but intractable grievance about their boss, steer them in the direction of this book. Fluency in body languageBody Language At Work: Read the signs and make the right moves, by Peter Clayton (Hamlyn, ISBN: 0600608026, priced around 12 from most bookshops).Body language skills are essential if you want to avoid offence while travelling. In Islamic countries, you should use only your right hand while eating and presenting gifts; the left hand is used solely for hygiene purposes. Meanwhile, in Hungary, men should not offer to shake hands with women unless invited.However, as Peter Clayton demonstrates, body language can be just important between people of the same culture, especially if one gets it badly wrong. His comprehensive, well-illustrated guide covers foreign faux pas and the less obvious, but equally damaging, mistakes we make in everyday business situations in the UK.Clayton explains that you can ruin a deal by standing too close to someone and can blow your credibility as a manager by using the wrong body language with your staff. He includes sections on how individuals can pitch successfully to small groups and how seating plans can make a difference to sales. And everyone should be familiar with his advice in the section entitled “How to lie well”.Networking for nice peopleRapid Result Referrals: Powerful tips and ideas to boost your sales, by Roy Sheppard (Centre Publishing, ISBN: 1901534049, £9.99 from Royspeaks.com, with discounts for bulk orders). And/or: The Ultimate Guide To Successful Networking, by Carole Stone (Vermillion, ISBN: 091900255, £4.99 from most bookshops).Most companies win a high proportion of their new business through recommendation and referral. Yet very few have a formal system in place to generate such leads. This could be because “networking” became a dirty word in the 1980s, associated with self-serving social climbers. Roy Sheppard and Carole Stone turn this definition on its head by suggesting that good networkers seek to help others, thereby earning themselves a good reputation. If positive things happen as a result, whether personal or professional, they should be treated as a bonus. Equally, there are sure-fire ways to make such things happen more often.As the title suggests, Sheppard’s book is geared more towards sales people. It explains in detail how to put structures in place that will generate more recommendations and referrals for your company. It advises on how to boost your reputation via trade shows, conferences, speaking events and the press.Stone’s book focuses more on soft skills and is particularly suited to those who are unsure of themselves in social situations. It explains how to “work the room” to seize networking opportunities, and how to nurture business relationships in the same way as friendships.The painless way to flawless grammarTroublesome Words, by Bill Bryson (Penguin, ISBN: 0767910436, £6,99 from most bookshops).Very few books on grammar are designed to be read for enjoyment and those that are, tend to be structured like novels rather than reference books. Yet Bill Bryson manages to inject humour and clarity into this useful A-to-Z guide.Before he wrote Notes From A Small Island, Bryson was a sub-editor at various publications including the Times and the Independent newspapers. This experience put him in a good position to identify our most commonly misused words. Indeed, throughout Troublesome Words, he tends to cite errors committed by supposed custodians of the English language, “to show how easily such errors are made”.Start by browsing the entries for common words. You may recognise the distinction between ‘forgo’ and ‘forego’, but what about ‘that’ and ‘which’? And are you sure your staff understand how a ‘defective’ product is different from one that is ‘deficient’? Do they know the difference between ‘percentages’ and ‘percentage points’?You may wish to keep this book nearby to prevent you from using a word without being certain of its usage and meaning. Yet it wouldn’t look out of place on the bedside table. The style is so accessible, it will be received more gratefully by your staff than any formal effort to improve their grammar.Be your own IT geekTroubleshooting Your PC For Dummies, by Dan Gookin (Wiley Publishing, ISBN: 0764516698, £18.95 from most bookshops). Or: Sad Macs, Bombs And Other Disasters: and what to do about them, by Ted Landau (Peachpit Press, ISBN: 0201622076, £18.89 from Amazon.co.uk).Have you ever waited an eternity for someone from IT, only to watch them fix your computer in just a few seconds? Most office workers in the UK are unsure of how the software and hardware they use every day works. And they’re even more in the dark when it comes to solving problems – also known as troubleshooting in IT jargon.In part, this ignorance is the fault of IT professionals, who generally resist the idea of workers trying to repair their own equipment. Yet the average computer user could solve most minor problems, with negligible risk to their system or network, if they had just a little extra knowledge. Your organisation may prohibit staff from administering first aid to their computers. Even so, a good book on troubleshooting should ease communication between your IT support function and other departments. The best authors of these books unravel jargon and ensure you have a thorough grasp of basic concepts. They tend to have their own websites providing tips and support to users of a specific platform. For example, Dan Gookin runs www.wambooli.com for PC users while Ted Landau runs www.macfixit.com. Buy the latest edition of one of their books and you can be sure it will contain up-to-date, comprehensive information.Beat the world’s favourite ailment – stressSelf-Help For Your Nerves: Learn to relax and enjoy life again by overcoming stress and fear, by Dr Claire Weekes (Thorsons, ISBN: 0722531559, £7.99 from most bookshops).We all claim to suffer from stress on occasion, but what does the word mean? In the workplace, it is generally used to describe an unhealthy state of mind brought on by excessive demands. While pressure can bring out the best in us, stress implies we have taken on too much and made ourselves ill.Yet in physiological terms, stress is no different from fear. This does not mean stressed-out workers are cowards. On the contrary, as Dr Claire Weekes states early on in this book: “The sufferer from nervous breakdown is neither fool nor coward, but often a remarkably brave person… with commendable, although often misdirected, courage.”You don’t have to be in the midst of a nervous breakdown to benefit from this book. It will help someone with even the mildest stress problem. However, in just 172 pages it provides enough guidance to alleviate the most acute suffering. It is also an ideal beginner’s guide to the origins and symptoms of nervous illness. No wonder it has remained a best-seller in its class since it was first published in 1962.Smash through the glass ceilingNice Girls Don’t Get The Corner Office: Unconscious mistakes women make that sabotage their careers, by Lois P Frankel (Warner Business Books, ISBN: 0446531324, £9.59 from Amazon.co.uk).This book is a best-seller in the US, and has been praised by female critics on both sides of the Atlantic for its brutally frank advice. Author Lois P Frankel acknowledges gender bias is still prevalent in the modern workplace, but makes no apologies for highlighting “the ways in which women hold themselves back from achieving their full potential”.A former psychotherapist and HR manager, Frankel is also co-founder and president of her own consultancy, Corporate Coaching International. Having worked with thousands of male and female executives, many at Fortune 500 companies, she has arrived at this conclusion: “From early childhood, girls are taught that their well-being and ultimate success is contingent upon acting in certain stereotypical ways.” In the workplace, she says, many women continue to behave subconsciously like girls, and thereby sabotage their own success.Her book details 101 mistakes and how to rectify or prevent them. The most useful sections deal with supposedly unfeminine traits such as competitiveness and self-assertiveness. For example, it suggests that consideration is emphasised more in the upbringing of girls than boys. As a result, women tend to be too patient, waiting too long for promotions, rises and bonuses. Other sections deal with neutralising chauvinistic behaviour and playing the game of business successfully, without having to act like a man. Previous Article Next Article Aim higherOn 15 Mar 2005 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. last_img read more

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first_imgBarbara B. Rosin, of Margate, wins first place for her “Pitchers and Petals” oil on glass artwork. (Photos courtesy of Ocean City Fine Arts League) The Ocean City Fine Arts League announced the winners in the “Flowers” Art Show & Exhibition in June.First place: Barbara B. Rosin, Margate, “Pitchers and Petals,” oil on glass.Second place: Jill Snyder, Margate, “Sunny Spring,” mosaic.Third place: Donna Mindish, Northfield, “Luminous,” pastel.Honorable mention: Kathleen Arleth, Somers Point, “Bouquet,” photograph.Honorable mention: Christine Thomas, “Flower Power,” mixed media.The Fine Arts League is celebrating the summer season July through August, so artists are encouraged to paint their favorite beach memories.The league is a co-op of artists and volunteers who maintain the Art on Asbury Gallery at 711 Asbury Ave. in Ocean City.For more information, call (609) 814-0308 or visit oceancityfineartsleague.org.Jill Snyder, of Margate, took second place with her “Sunny Spring” mosaic.last_img read more

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first_img Leeds Bradford Airport Birmingham Airport Manchester Airport Luton Airport Gatwick Airport On 24 April 2019 the Employment Tribunal made a protective award to former employees of Monarch Airlines Limited to recompense them for the failure to consult about the potential for the redundancies following the business being put into administration.The Insolvency Service has received a copy of the protective award and we are processing the payments that are due to eligible former employees of the airline.Am I covered by the protective award?The protective award covers employees who worked from, or were based at, one of these sites: What do I need to do?You don’t need to take any further action just now. If you’re eligible for a Protective Award payment we aim to pay this within 12 weeks. However, we may contact you before this time if we need further information.last_img read more

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